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700,000 + eggs

Discussion in 'Food in the News' started by sidevalve, Aug 11, 2017.

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  1. sidevalve

    sidevalve Senior Member

    Location:
    Durham NE. England
    So we seem to have 'acquired' over 700,000 eggs that we have to destroy thanks to the EU. No excuses about 'it's not a threat to humans' [that would be said if they were laced with cyanide] or 'it was just a once off thing' please. Lower our food standards to fit in with the USA ? - perhaps but maybe if we didn't just meekly accept the produce of the EU as perfect like good little lemmings we might be better off.
     
  2. bluejeanbaby

    bluejeanbaby Regular Member

    Location:
    America
    In one of my former lives I farmed cotton (America).
    In order to stabilize prices we were paid a subsidy (by the federal government) to NOT plant on a % of total acreage.
    Sounds a lot like your egg problem.
    Ridiculous when so many children go to bed hungry.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  3. sidevalve

    sidevalve Senior Member

    Location:
    Durham NE. England
    Not really [but I understand you r point] - these have actually been poisoned by animal flea killer - still that's the EU - pure as the driven snow :whistling:
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  4. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    These eggs are the ones that go into the food production chain - so they would have ended up in biscuits, ready-made sandwiches, cakes etc. but not as eggs on the shelf. This was something I hadn't realised before this news item came up - that the eggs in these products were not eggs farmed in the UK.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  5. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Some people I know think I'm mad for making my own bread, cakes, biscuits, sandwiches etc and for buying organic food. Perhaps there's method in my madness after all. At least I know where it comes from.
     
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  6. Lullabelle

    Lullabelle Midlands, England

    Location:
    Leicester UK
    It helps to know where food comes from although it has come to light that some 'farms' mentioned on cartons/packets don't actually exist :o_o:
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  7. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Exactly! Especially now that some supermarkets are relabelling their "value" ranges. At least I can go to the farms I get my food from, and of course it is not that easy to get organic status.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  8. epicuric

    epicuric Senior Member Staff Member

    Whilst I am no fan of the EU, I don't think you can blame them for this - they put in place regulations banning the use of this pesticide anywhere near food production. Try pointing the finger at the commercial cleaning firm who used the offending products to clean hundreds of hen houses across Belgium and Denmark, or the farmers who employed them, or the Belgian government who allegedly kept the whole thing under wraps for several weeks instead of alerting the appropriate EU authorities. Maybe look a bit closer to home at why our supermarkets need to buy cheap, inferior eggs from overseas when we have a ready supply of quality British Lion Marked eggs over here.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  9. sidevalve

    sidevalve Senior Member

    Location:
    Durham NE. England
    I agree , I am only pointing out the strange belief many [and yes it is many] people seem to have that the good old EU has [and faultlessly maintains] such high food standards [I remember the French wine scandal - antifreeze I think it was] and that to risk leaving the EU will result in us all being poisoned by those 'nasty foreigners' [ie anybody in the rest of the world in fact] or being starved by being unable to produce any food of our own. Yes of course we can't produce ALL our own - Britain is and always has been a trading nation but we can produce some of it. Are our farmers perfect - no, of course not but at least they will be bound by our standards and policed by our inspectors. Why our supermarkets buy such things is quite irrelevant. but being in the EU I suspect that one of the reasons might just we have to accept so much european produce - like it or not.
    As for the 'lion' mark I haven't seen that on an egg for many years - anywhere. Do you still see it ?
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  10. epicuric

    epicuric Senior Member Staff Member

    . I think I see where you are coming from, but I still don't think its fair to blame the EU for the criminal or negligent actions of rogue producers. Don't forget that we have had our own share of problems - BSE, Salmonella in eggs, horsemeat labelled as beef etc. On balance, I would trust the EU to protect food standards over our own government. It is the EU that has largely kept GMO's at bay, despite aggressive lobbying from our own government. Remember Owen Patterson's antics when he was Minister for Agriculture? Not to mention the lunatics at Rothamstead.

    Actually, it's not. Unfortunately, we live in a society obsessed with ever lower food prices regardless of the impact on quality. Inevitably this puts a squeeze on the whole supply chain, and corners are cut. If only consumers put quality before price then such food scares would not happen.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  11. classic33

    classic33 P.O.

    BSE is a natural disease, known under different names worldwide. The horsemeat in the initial scare, actually came from mainland Europe. Which is why many outlets were soon saying their meat was 100% UK produced.

    Worth noting that BSE infected meat remained on sale, in Europe, long after it was banned in the UK.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  12. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    According to egg info "The British Lion is the UK’s most successful food safety scheme. Over 90% of UK eggs are now produced under the British Lion scheme. More than 130 billion British Lion eggs have been sold since its launch in 1998.", and according to Tesco all their eggs are lion-marked, but I must admit it's a long time since I've seen any too. The organic eggs I get are not lion marked but they are all stamped with a traceable egg code and even have the name of the actual farm they have come from on them.

    Interesting to note, the free rabge eggs I bought from Sainsburys when I ran out of organic ones were not traceable - although they were stamped UK etc the code on them was not in the database.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  13. bluejeanbaby

    bluejeanbaby Regular Member

    Location:
    America
    OK...I get it.
    The American government is boycotting beef from Brazil.
    Seems the last few shipments have had some nasty (lesions?) surprises.
    Already seeing store brand (generic) butter at over six dollars pp...altho what dairy cows have to do with sides of beef from steers is way beyond my comprehension.
    Being greedy I suppose.

    One last thing...as long as America has food...her allies will not go hungry.
     
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  14. epicuric

    epicuric Senior Member Staff Member

    I understand that there is a worldwide shortage of butter, so that probably explains the hike in price, although I haven't noticed it over here. The bubble has burst on the fat/cholesterol myth, and people are switching back to butter from processed margarines in huge numbers, hence the shortage.
     
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  15. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    I have a standing order for my butter (from Brue Valley, one of the dairies that said the price was going to go sky high), but I've noticed when I've been shopping that the supermarkets no longer seem to have much organic ordinary butter any more and no unsalted organic butter at all. Organic produce seems to be harder to get hold of in either Tesco or Sainsbury's locally although some is still available online. As far as milk is concerned, the only unhomogenised milk I can get locally from a supermarket is Channel Islands milk from Tesco. I still get that as an occasional treat, although the fat content of it is only very slightly more than the milk I get regularly (5% as opposed to 4.5% from the farm, or 4% from the milkman).
     
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