1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Odd question about tea

Discussion in 'Beverages, Drinks and Smoothies' started by sidevalve, Aug 21, 2017.

Tags:
  1. sidevalve

    sidevalve Senior Member

    Location:
    Durham NE. England
    Been thinking about the various drinks that call themselves 'tea'.
    'Tea' is not a process or a way of cooking it is a drink made from the tea plant just as coffee is a drink made from coffee beans. So why do we seem to call any drink involving hot water 'tea' ?
    If I ordered a van from a dealer and received a car with the excuse "oh it's made in the same way" I wouldn't be too happy so why is this acceptable with tea ? I'm not referring to the odd drinks that call themselves tea that are tea with various flavours - I mean the shameless imposters that are just not and do not contain tea. Is it beyond the ability of humanity to think of a name for these drinks so that we have to fall back on something completely different and pretend ? We don't call mead beer or whisky rum even though they are made in a similar way. Is the world just too lazy ?
    Ho Hum - rant over.
     
  2. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    My thoughts exactly!

    "Tea: The leaves of the tea-plant usually in a dried and prepared state for making the drink; first imported into Europe in the 17th century, and now extensively used in various parts of the world."

    Definition courtesy of the Oxford English Dictionary

    or, in other words, if it 'asn't got tea leaves in it, it ain't tea :D
     
    Lullabelle and Francesca like this.
  3. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Strictly speaking such 'teas' should be called 'infusions'.
     
    Elawin and Francesca like this.
  4. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    There is also the rather quaint term 'tisanes' which apparently originally referred to a barley infusion.
     
    Francesca likes this.
  5. Duck59

    Duck59 Über Member Staff Member

    Location:
    Fife, Scotland
    The word tisane is French, very simply translated as "herb tea" (surprisingly enough).
     
  6. Francesca

    Francesca Guest

    Location:
    Barcelona
    @Duck59, @morning glory

    The French word, "Tisane " in English is just "infusión" ..

    "Tisane de Hierbes" : is Herbal Infusión and in extremely formal Spanish: "Tisana de Infusión de Hierbas" ..

    Infusions can be made with fruits, dried fruits and vegetables, barks, stems, roots and herbs or grains, or spices .. etcetra ..

    Have a nice day ..
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  7. Francesca

    Francesca Guest

    Location:
    Barcelona
    @sidevalve,

    Yes, tea is prepared from tea leaves for centuries.

    An herbal infusión is prepared from leaves and secondary buds / flowers of Herbs.

    Infusions are prepared from a wide variety of other agricultural products, for e.g. : Spices, fruits, roots, barks, stems, bulbs, vegetables, grains etcetra ..

    Have a nice day ..
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
  8. sidevalve

    sidevalve Senior Member

    Location:
    Durham NE. England
    Thank you all - nice to know I am not a lone voice :thumbsup:
     
    Elawin and Francesca like this.
  9. Francesca

    Francesca Guest

    Location:
    Barcelona

    @sidevalve,

    No, you are not a lone voice.

    I have never heard " tea " being called an infusión in Spain.

    At a bar, if we want to order a tea, we ask for " Un té, por favor " or we ask if they have an assortment of teas, for example, Black Tea, White Tea, Red Tea and / or Green Tea or via " The Name of the Type of Tea, for example, Earl Grey ( quite popular here ) ..

    If we want an "infusión", we ask for " Un infusión de hierbas, Por Favor " .. etcetra ..

    It is like calling a cat, a horse any other way !!!!

    Have a nice evening ..
     
  10. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    I don't even like these infusions. They can stop making fruit "teas" and herbal "teas" if they want. I wouldn't miss them in the slightest.
     
    morning glory and Francesca like this.
  11. pinkcherrychef

    pinkcherrychef Regular Member

    Location:
    Egypt
    Lol I've gotten mad at the same thing. I keep seeing in stores of boxes saying anise tea, helba tea, hibiscus tea. I'm saying to myself this contains no tea <.< you lie! IMO I think people just want to make it maybe a bit easier when it comes to categories so they just stick it with tea. That's so wrong though it's like calling coffee hot cocoa lol. However I'm not talking negatively either only joking mostly. It doesn't really technically matter it just drives me personally a bit annoyed but that's just me being persnickety lol. It's like when you fine a tiny little dot on your clothes and only you notice and it's no big deal but it just bugs you. It's kinda like that lol.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
    Francesca likes this.
  12. Francesca

    Francesca Guest

    Location:
    Barcelona
    @pinkcherrychef

    There are teas (Earl Grey a black tea, Green Tea, White Tea, Red Tea, English Breakfast, Ceylon etcetra) and there are "herbal infusions" ( Mint, Anise etcetra .. ) and there are "fruit infusions" ( mango, papaya etcetra ).

    Also teas can be combined with herbs or flowers or fruits as well .. Earl Grey is a Black Tea but bergamot is not a tea, it is a lemon like citron fruit ..

    I have no problem with this mix up or lack of knowledge when I order a tea or buy teas or herbal or fruit infusions ..

    Have a nice day ..
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
    classic33 likes this.
  13. classic33

    classic33 Guest

    Why not call them "fruit infusions" then?

    There's a local one(to me), I'm not certain is actually legal.
     
  14. Francesca

    Francesca Guest

    Location:
    Barcelona
    @classic33

    Earl Grey is a black tea with a bit of bergamot added to it ..

    It is not an herbal infusión ..

    I am in Italy and do not have my teas or herbal infusions with me to read the label contents ..

    However, surely there is a huge difference and a website such ( possibly Wikipedia ) to explain the exact nuances and / or % factors ..
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
    classic33 likes this.
  15. classic33

    classic33 Guest

    I was thinking more of on the packing thsn anywhere else, see how well they sell then.

    It'd have a few wondering.
     
    Francesca likes this.

Share This Page