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Recipe Portobello Tagliatelle with Roasted Garlic

Discussion in 'Vegetables, Salads and Mushrooms' started by The Late Night Gourmet, May 18, 2017.

  1. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Regular Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    Things like this are why I love cooking. I saw @MypinchofItaly's beautiful tagliatelle recipe with mushrooms, and it reminded me of how much I love that combination. It also reminded me that I haven't made pasta in a while. But, there's something that happens when you love to cook, and you're also just a little bit crazy. I decided that, rather than making pasta with mushrooms, I'd make pasta with mushrooms inside it. Get comfortable, folks, because I'm taking you on a little journey.

    I've made pasta with spinach in the dough, and pasta with tomatoes in the dough. Both vegetables have the same problem: they have a lot of moisture that needs to be dealt with. Mushrooms might not seem like they have moisture in them, but they do. I didn't want the moisture to break down the integrity of the pasta. So, dealing with that was the first step.

    Drying out the Mushrooms

    I'm probably guilty of some international crime against food for what I did here, but I figured I had to make the mushrooms have the same consistency as the flour. Portobello mushrooms are beautiful and flavorful, which is why I wanted to use them. First, I took the "baby bellas" and sliced them at the 1mm setting on my mandoline:

    IMG_0733.JPG

    Then, I heated them at the lowest setting on my oven for an hour. My oven's lowest temp is 170° F. Here's what they looked like after an hour:
    IMG_0735.JPG

    Getting there, but not quite good enough, so I scraped up the mushrooms, redistributed them, and cooked them for another hour, which left this:

    IMG_0736.JPG

    There was no moisture left at all, so I put them in my coffee grinder (er...mushroom grinder):

    IMG_0738.JPG
    IMG_0739.JPG
    Now, it's ready to mix with the flour:

    IMG_0740.JPG
    ...and form - after a lot of kneading - into the dough:

    IMG_0741.JPG

    I was surprised at how dark it made the dough. And, I was very happy with the speckled texture. But, how would it work when I started rolling it out and forming it into pasta? After much trial and error over the years, I've concluded that the best flour to use when making pasta is Italian 00 flour. I shouldn't have worried:

    IMG_0743.JPG IMG_0744.JPG

    And, finally, the finished product. I did just make a pesto - which admittedly is delicious with the pasta - but I didn't want anything obscuring the speckled beauty of the pasta. So. I roasted some garlic and tossed the pasta with olive oil. Again, my weakness in plating means this doesn't look all that special, but if you zoom in to see the pasta itself, you can see how beautiful it really is:
    IMG_0745.JPG

    Now, the recipe. I did see 2 recipes on the internet that showed using dried porcini mushrooms. This is probably okay, but I don't like that this doesn't let you pick your mushrooms. So, you can skip the parts about drying out the mushrooms if you choose, but I really highly recommend it. One other thing that I remember as I write this is that there's a phenomenal smell of mushrooms during the cooking process: the water at the end reminds me of a sort of mushroom broth.

    Ingredients

    8 ounces baby bella mushrooms
    2 cups Italian 00 flour
    4 large eggs, thoroughly beaten
    1/2 tablespoon kosher salt
    1/2 tablespoon olive oil

    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to lowest setting (170° F on my oven).
    2. Slice mushrooms using a mandoline on the thinnest setting. Place mushroom slices on baking sheets on a single layer. Bake for 1 hour. Scrape up mushrooms from baking sheets and redistribute again in a single layer. Bake for 1 more hour. If there is still moisture in the mushrooms, continue baking in 10 minute increments as needed.
    3. Using a coffee grinder or spice grinder, grind dried mushrooms until they reach a powder consistency.
    4. Stir mushroom powder into flour with salt. Using a mixer equipped with dough hooks, and running on a low setting, gradually introduce whisked eggs and olive oil. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides as needed. Continue blending until dough pulls from the side of the bowl.
    5. Remove dough and whatever dry parts remain and knead on a lightly floured surface until all the dry elements are combined. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and allow to rest for at least 30 minutes.
    6. Bring a large pot of water to boil. NOTE: there's no need to add salt to the water, since the pasta contains salt already.
    7. Cut dough into 4 pieces. Rewrap 3 of the pieces in the plastic wrap to keep them from drying out. Roll out the dough into a rectangular shape. Using a pasta roller, starting on the widest setting, roll out the dough into a sheet. Cut in half if needed to get the desired length for the pasta. Cut pasta into the desired shape by hand or using the attachments.Hang pasta on drying racks prior to cooking if desired.
    8. Place pasta a little bit at a time into the water (one rack at a time if using drying racks). Boil for about 2 minutes, until al dente, and remove from water using tongs. Place on another rack to dry for a few minutes to remove excess moisture. NOTE: don't drain the water!
    9. Repeat steps 7 & 8 until all pasta is cooked.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  2. MypinchofItaly

    MypinchofItaly Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Milano (Italy)
    Oh wow! Wow! Wow! Bravissimo! I love your recipe, really great!
     
  3. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Regular Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    Thank you for putting me back on track...I hadn't made very many Italian dishes lately. I should have known it would take someone from Italy to pull my Italian heritage out of me. :)
     
    morning glory likes this.
  4. MypinchofItaly

    MypinchofItaly Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Milano (Italy)
    Hahah, :thumbsup: I think it's only passion for cooking. Tagliatelle could inspired a lot!:happy:
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  5. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    This is fantastic @Ken Natton! I'm very impressed!
     
  6. Ken Natton

    Ken Natton Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Bolton, UK
    A great idea, @The Late Night Gourmet. I do recall seeing one of the British TV chefs, Tom Kerridge, making a ham and mushroom pie when he did something very similar to make a mushroom pastry. I don't recall whether he did anything to dry the mushrooms, I suppose he must have done. But he certainly did turn them into a powder to add to his flour. It looked wonderful, but I have never actually attempted to make it. I think that I am just going to have to have a go at making mushroom pasta.
     
  7. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    View attachment 7106
    Kerridge used already dried mushrooms blitzed in a spice grinder - I was going to use that idea... :D
     
  8. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Regular Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    If you do decide to do this, I've read that the rule of thumb seems to be about a 10:1 ratio of fresh to dry. But, my 8 ounces of mushrooms shrank down to 0.6 ounces of dried mushrooms, which is about 13:1. Regardless, that's a lot of water to evaporate!
     
  9. Ken Natton

    Ken Natton Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Bolton, UK
    Evening, @morning glory, I hope you are feeling much better this evening. So you did see it as well? One of the things that intimidated me about that is just how superb his pie looked once he had finished making it, before he baked it. It just seems an impossibility that I could ever get a pie to look that good.

    And actually, @The Late Night Gourmet, there is an issue there, not quite as strong, but similar. Whenever I home make pasta - and I have done so several times - I can never get it to look that regular when I have finished rolling it. I often use home made pasta for lasagne, and its fine, I can just kind of piece all my irregular pasta shapes together in a sort of tessellation challenge to form a pasta layer in my lasgane. But quite how you get such a lovely long perfectly shaped piece as you got from your pasta roller I just don't know.
     
  10. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I'm a bit better thank you. Migraine usually lasts two to three days and its just clearing. I did see the show but confess that I can't remember what the pie looked like or what was inside it! I wrote down the idea about using dried mushrooms in the pastry which is how I remembered. Do you recall what sort of pie it was?
     
  11. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Regular Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    The 00 flour (sometimes referred to as "extra fine" flour) makes all the difference. I've tried using all purpose flour, and usually ran into the same trouble you describe. As an alternative, I have substituted 1/4 of the AP flour with semolina. This adds a sturdiness that will hold up to rolling, while not affecting the final texture much. But, the 00 flour is really what I'd recommend. Having said that, it's not easy to find, nor is it cheap. I had to call several specialty shops to find one that had it. And, even there, it was roughly 3 times the price of AP flour. So, I use AP flour for almost everything else, but I always use 00 flour for pasta. :)

    Here's an excellent article that explains why 00 flour works so well, and why it may be worth the price:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-deal-with-00-flour-108281
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
    morning glory likes this.
  12. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I use half semolina, half 00 flour which works well.
     
  13. Ken Natton

    Ken Natton Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Bolton, UK

    No, 00 flour is exactly what I use - it is readily available in supermarkets here. Some just call it pasta flour but usually somewhere on the packaging it will tell you that it is 00 flour. In truth I think part of the issue is my pasta rolling machine is a cheap and nasty one. I should invest in a better one, not least because mine does not have a tagliatelle cutter and it is so damn laborious trying to cut it any other way. And actually, for so many dishes, tagliatelle is my favourite. Certainly far better in a carbonara than spaghetti. I'm afraid I tend to but ready made tagliatelle. One of the things I learned from two Italian TV chefs to make your ordinary pasta look better is to use one whole egg and two egg yolks. Gives the pasta a much nicer colour.
     
    morning glory likes this.
  14. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Your pasta machine looks much like mine - but mine does have a tagliatelle cutter. The semolina in the mix does work quite well as it adds a bit of texture (home-made pasta can be a bit 'slimy' when cooked) it makes it less sticky so easier to roll.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  15. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Regular Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    The tagliatelle cutter on mine is getting dull...you can see that some pieces are stuck together on the drying rack, and I decided to wait until after they were cooked to separate them. I'm guessing there's someone somewhere who sharpens these things, but it would probably be cheaper to get a new one. My pasta maker was from WalMart, and it cost $25USD and included tagliatelle and capellini (angel hair pasta) attachments. I see comparable ones for about that price on Amazon.com. If it's something you do more than twice, then I'd say it's worth the investment.
     
    morning glory likes this.

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