Reverse Seared Rib-Eye

Discussion in 'Outdoor Cooking and BBQs' started by CraigC, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    SE Florida
    The technique of reverse sear creates some beautiful results. You start with a low fire to bring the internal temperature to within 10F of your desired finished temperature, remove the steak, letting it rest while you crank the temperature to 650F. Then you sear the steak to get that great crust. The steak is seasoned with just salt and pepper. After using this method on a 3" thick rib-eye, Karen said I'M not allowed to cook rib-eyes any other way.

    I had to have the butcher cut this steak as the ones in the case don't come close to 3" thick.
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    The BGE set at 250F
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    After the searing which only took 1 minute per side, being rotated 90 Degrees after 30 seconds.
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    Sliced
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    Plated with roast potatoes, creamed spinach and sauteed onions on top
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  2. toddhicks209

    toddhicks209 Active Member

    We get thick steaks from Sam's Club and slice them in half ourselves lengthwise. We then eat these portions one day and the other portions another day.
     
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  3. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Senior Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    @CraigC

    That is beautiful!

    The meat department at my local market cuts rib eye to order. I have never considered a 3" steak. 1" to 1 1/" is enough for us to have 2 meals. We get whole rib eye at Costco - Black Angus - and cut them ourselves. The next time we get one I will cut a 3" steak and try your method.

    We do not have a BGE. The broil temp on the oven is 500 degrees F. Would it work if I did the initial cook in the oven then crank it up to broil?
     
    CraigC likes this.
  4. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    That is certainly a beautiful result. I'm getting jealous of that BGE!
     
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  5. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    SE Florida
    Do you have a propane jet cooker for doing crawfish boils (Bayou Classic)? if so, you could do the low and slow in the oven and get a cast iron pan white hot (as you would for blackening) and do the sear in it. If you're into sous vide, you could bring the meat up to the 10F below desired internal temperature and then sear it in the CI pan. We like the taste that the hardwood charcoal provides using the BGE. You can't get the 1800F that Ruth's Chris does with their ovens/broilers, but I think the wood taste off sets that unique technique.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  6. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Senior Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    Of course we have a propane burner for boils. G has an LPG grill with a side burner. I frequently sear steaks in a cast iron skillet on that burner. That would work. :thankyou:
     
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  7. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    SE Florida
    I'm not sure that side burner can get to the temperatures that the propane burner can. Many folks try doing stir-fry on their gas stoves (about as good as that side burner on the gas grill) but they can't develop the BTUs to achieve "Wok Hei". that is why I have been using the propane burner for stir-fry.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  8. epicuric

    epicuric Senior Member Staff Member

    Location:
    Shropshire, UK
    That's not a steak - it's a Sunday roast! Looks amazing. Generally in the UK we lack both the equipment and the skills for outdoor cooking, probably due to the climate. I do reverse sear occasionally using a cast iron skillet on a gas hob, but not for steak. I don't think I've ever cooked a steak more than 1" thick (a piece of fillet would be a little thicker) so two stage cooking not needed.
     
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  9. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    Funnily enough, I've nearly always cooked steak in the oven with veggies etc and then give the steak a quick zap in a heavy bottomed frying pan to get the colour. Same works nicely for chops too.
     
    ElizabethB likes this.
  10. detroitdad

    detroitdad Senior Member

    Location:
    Ypsilanti, MI.
    I love reverse seared rib-eyes. My buddy picks will pick us up a 28 day aged Bone in Tomahawk Rib-eye. 32 ounces, 2 ish inches thing. We only season it with kosher salt I believe. Then he uses the reverse sear method. I'll have to look for some pictures. They are somewhere on photobucket I believe.

    B
     
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