What have you grown in your veg plot or garden this year?

Discussion in 'The Veg Plot, Growing to Canning and Preserving' started by SatNavSaysStraightOn, Sep 30, 2016.

  1. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    I'm just at the start of the growing season here in the South east of Australia. I'm at an altitude of 800m so things are about a month behind many other areas such as Canberra (the capital of Australia).

    I've just sown the first round of runner beans, borlotti beans, peas, onions, garlic, carrots, lettuce, spinach, rhubarb (ok not sown but purchased), potatoes and purple cauliflower. They are all outside but it is too cold and the risk of frost still way too high for me to allow some of my produce to be planted out, so for the time being the cucumber, chilli plants, aubergine, tomatoes, strawberry, pineberry, courgette, aubergine, butternut squash and Lebanese aubergine are all indoors. I have yet to even sow half of my stuff.

    But I know that the UK and northern hemispheres are coming towards the end of their summer and should be enjoying their harvest now. So what have you sewn this year? I am needing some more ideas.
     
    Francesca likes this.
  2. Berties

    Berties Senior Member

    Location:
    Salisbury Uk
    Runner beans,loads of herbs,calvo Nero,courgettes,soft fruits,gooseberries ,kale,various leaves,broad beans,
    Cabbages are going to be sparse next year due to club root seems to have evaded part of the garden
     
  3. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    Hi, good to see you back again. Missed you.

    I'm on an experiment to see what grows year, plus what my chooks don't like as well. They veg plot is fenced off but it won't stop a determined wombat, possum or chook. Mind you the parakeets and Rosellas seem pretty destructive as well!
     
    Francesca likes this.
  4. Berties

    Berties Senior Member

    Location:
    Salisbury Uk
    We found the chickens got in the plot and scratched ,we would even attempt to clip their wings,with the soft fruits you have to share with the birds,the same with the eating apples,we often get pheasants hanging around especially cocks that don't get paired up they eat anything,the dog does chase them off
     
    Francesca likes this.
  5. MrsDangermouse

    MrsDangermouse Senior Member

    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    We've had tomatoes, chillies and peppers from the greenhouse, sweetcorn, cucumbers, peas, spring onions, carrots, spinach and lettuces from the garden, and potatoes, carrots, onions, parsnips, broad beans and borlotti beans from the allotment. We've done a lot better than last year but we're still experimenting and learning the best way to do things: its only our second summer in this house and our first with the allotment.

    Didn't have much luck with our fruit trees: the two pears in the garden didn't even blossom (think they're probably too young yet) and the cherry and plum trees on the allotment had some fruit but it was all eaten by something despite the netting.

    We're now planning our over-winter veg: cabbages, sprouts, onions, garlic & broad beans, and thinking ahead to what we need to get ready for next year - need to put some rhubarb in before the winter arrives, finish building the raised allotment beds and dig in some manure to replenish the garden and allotment beds.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016
  6. Frizz1974

    Frizz1974 Senior Member

    I took a break from the gardens last year & it's taken a huge amount of work to get them almost grass free & ready to produce again.

    We are at 950m elevation so the season is a bit short, with locals advising not planting anything in the open until after the first week of November, though I did this year in late October as we hadn't had a frost since late September.

    I also planted a bunch of old seed in September to see what would happen. The snow peas & kale took off. I've just pulled the snow peas out as the heat last week did them in but I got a few kilos over about 8 weeks of daily picking.


    Right now I'm waiting for my first tomatoes, zucchini, cucumber & corn to hurry up.

    I've pumpkins in too.

    The lettuce self seeds but I also put a bunch of mixed leaf salad plants in & I just cut what I want each day.


    What's happening with everyone's gardens?

    Do you grow herbs? I'll save mine for another post.
     
  7. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    I grow loads of things. I'll have to have a peep at the peas, the beans just tick over until it gets cooler not producing anything until then, then they take off. We're at 800m (ish) with both the heat of the plains at 750m and the coldness of the mountains behind us deepening on which way the wind blows.

    Herbs are taking off. Most bolt as do lettuce, spinach, kale (though it is reasonably successful) rainbow chard, carrots. Leeks do well if I can keep them whetted enough and my tattties are doing really well. Beetroot is hit and miss but I also eat the leaves when young in salads, spring onions do ok, onions are another matter as is garlic. Neither really worked last year and this season isn't much better. The last frost we got was mid November this season and within a week it was up around 30C before you knew it. Herbs left right and centre. I have a dedicated bed for them and several other areas along with the rhubarb. I use the natural condensing effect of the tin roof to provide the herbs with just enough water. It works well in the dry season with the high humidity which often leads to nothing... It's pretty much name a herb and it will grow (except for garlic). We even have a grape fine but we are right on the edge with the temperature range it can survive in winter (we lost Half of the vines last winter).

    I'm getting plenty of courgettes (assuming they are watered daily) but the squash ate another matter, I think the possum had found them. but he's missed the cucumber which is doing well. Loads of other things are growing in the new beds including aubergine (doing really well) but my tomatoes have failed completely...
     
    Francesca likes this.
  8. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Not a lot in mine! Its winter and all is dormant. But last year I found a gardener (I hate gardening except pottering with pots) so I'm hoping for more edible planting in the spring.
     
  9. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    I spent an hour or so pulling up all of the sour cherry tree suckers. Some of them came up with plenty of root attached so I've decided to plant them elsewhere in the garden, ideally somewhere with a touch more soil than where the existing Kentish sour cherries are growing which hardly gets any rain and has very little soil. I'm also on the hunt for a new location for an olive tree and will probably purchase it a friend in the next few days. I have a feeling they need more than 1 to cross pollinate to create fruit (I'm assuming cross pollination) because this is the 2nd year it has had loads of flowers and not produced or even tried to produce s single fruit :(

    The newly fenced off been area is working really well. The chooks are lazy as I suspected (the same applies to rabbits) and they won't or can't be bothered to jump over a 18 inch high fence. I knew rabbits wouldn't if there was nowhere clear for them to land, but only suspected the dame was true for chooks. Even my 2-3 week old chicks can't get through the wide showing off the fencing which is more ornamental than functional. I already knew what was planted in there wasn't of interest to the possum or wombat, and the roos and wallabies don't come right up against the house at that point (they go under it elsewhere though!). So I can now get a few more things planned out... Yippee
     
    Francesca likes this.
  10. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    Ironically that was always one of the busiest times in the garden in the UK. Bare rooted plants such as raspberries, red and white currants (or black or pink), rhubarb, and many other fruit trees are usually transplanted during the winter months. Various veg over winter in the garden and some can already be got going in greenhouses, so don't dismiss winter as being quiet. Soil preparation is also essential and frost and rain breaks down large clumps of soil more effectively than humans. Also adding fertiliser (manure) is best done now for a good veg plot...
     
    Francesca likes this.
  11. Frizz1974

    Frizz1974 Senior Member

    The BoM says there’s a 60% chance of rain tomorrow afternoon.

    It wasn’t terribly hot, but the sun was fierce this afternoon & it was windy today.


    The gardeners dilemma. Do I water in the morning or hold off & see what happens?
     
  12. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Well I don't have any of these (except a huge cherry tree) so in my case it is very quiet!
     
  13. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    It was more if you were planning to have any because you said you wanted to get a veg plot going... If you wanted them, they would need to be planted soon.
     
    Francesca likes this.
  14. SatNavSaysStraightOn

    SatNavSaysStraightOn (Site Owner) Staff Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    I've given up and water.. I know the likelihood of getting rain and we fall into a train shadow. Down the road can be underwater, I'll be dry.

    So we now have an automated drip feed system for the veg plot. I still have to water the pots and the herb psych, plus courgettes and flat beds though....
     
    Francesca likes this.
  15. winterybella

    winterybella Über Member

    Location:
    Barbados
    I can answer what has been grown in the garden. I can't say I've had a hand in the planting process. I reap and prepare. So here goes. Tomatoes, sweet potatoes, bananas, plantains, parsley, some half dead carrots, cassava, green peas (very few), spinach, eggplant (I don't care for a repeat) and maybe a few things I can't remember.
     
    morning glory likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice