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What's on your cooking bucket list?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Food Discussions' started by morning glory, Nov 11, 2017.

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  1. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Do you have a list of recipes or techniques that you have never cooked before but plan to try? My list gets longer by the day! Here are a few of them:

    Waffles
    Strudel/filo pastry
    Kimchi
    Sous vide (anything sous vide!)
    Lobster Thermidore
    Rice paper wraps
    Food made using a smoking gun
    Various savoury foams (gadget required)
     
  2. Francesca

    Francesca Senior Member

    Location:
    Barcelona
    All of the dishes you have mentioned above, I have eaten in restaurants except for two. Just is not my flavor profile ..

    As a matter of fact, it is a pure pity to take a fresh lobster and put cognac, bechamel, mustard or variant, egg yolks and stuff into the Shell with cream .. So many gross récipes for it ..

    I prefer my lobster steamed or boiled in sea water and a dip or 2 in melted French butter .. Champagne and Voila ..

    The other no go for is Kimichi .. Had a tiny tiny tasting at a major Gastronomic Convention and it was just not my flavor profile ..

    In actuality, off the top of my head, I would have to sit down and think it over as I do not cook on a daily basis so if I had some time to really do something I have never made -- probably traditional Sicilian Cannolli with Marsala Wine and perhaps a Normandy French Baguette ..
     
  3. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I've tasted it and love it! Its all about what you eat it with and the Koreans swear by it. I want to make my own. I love the concept of fermented foods. There are very few cuisines I don't like as it happens!

    I sort of agree with you about the Lobster Thermidore. But I believe it could work and want to try making it.
     
    ElizabethB and Francesca like this.
  4. Shermie

    Shermie Senior Member

    Location:
    Brighton, MA.
    Turducken Roll..jpg


    My long-time dream is to make turducken. Not the big turkey like you normally see.
    But in the form of a small roll (pictured above).

    A large turkey is way too much!! It's only me. :wink:
     
  5. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    Well, I've thought and I've thought, and I can't think of anything :eek: I always wanted to make a strudel from scratch, and I did that a couple of days ago. Kimchi (vegan, so no fish) and sauerkraut did spring to mind, but ooooh the salt :sick: There are one or two things I'd like to make, but my allergies and intolerances rule them out, and I don't see the point of making something that I can't eat and enjoy.

    I think, for the time being at any rate, I'll just concentrate on improving what I've already made.

    And, for the record, I like my seafood swimming in the sea, where it should be :laugh:
     
  6. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    @Shermie

    A regional favorite and a frequent guest on the Thanks Giving or Christmas buffet table. Between each bird there is stuffing - crawfish/cornbread, a seasoned rice and meat mixture, seasoned bread stuffing. The cavity is often stuffed with onions, garlic, celery, carrots, both sweet and hot peppers. A beautiful plate.

    From Wiki.

    Credit for the creation of the turducken is uncertain, though it is generally agreed to have been popularized by Cajun chef Paul Prudhomme. The most common claimant is Hebert's Specialty Meats in Maurice, Louisiana, whose owners Junior and Sammy Hebert say they created it in 1985 "when a local man brought his own birds to their shop and asked the brothers to create the medley".[4]

    A New Orleans surgeon, Dr. Gerald R. LaNasa, was locally known for his use of a scalpel in deboning his three birds of choice, sometimes adding pork or veal roasts in the final hen's cavity, thus preserving the turducken tradition as a regional holiday favorite of the southern United States. Andouille sausage and Foie Gras were always key ingredients of the LaNasa creations. The results of Dr. LaNasa's work can be found in the modern day mass-produced turducken or turduckhen (another variation adding or substituting a cornish game hen). His turkey, duck, and chicken ballotine is now widely commercially available under multiple trademark names. Dr. LaNasa's innovation and success with ballotine, Three Bird Roast and turducken began mid century, expanding in the 1960s and seventies long before many of the popular commercial Cajun/Creole chefs of today took the stage.[citation needed]

    In the United Kingdom, a turducken is a type of ballotine called a "three-bird roast" or a "royal roast".[citation needed] The Pure Meat Company offered a five-bird roast (a goose, a turkey, a chicken, a pheasant, and a pigeon, stuffed with sausage), described as a modern revival of the traditional Yorkshire Christmas pie, in 1989;[5][6] and a three-bird roast (a duck stuffed with chicken stuffed with a pigeon, with sage and apple stuffing) in 1990.[5][6] Multi-bird roasts are widely available.[dubious

    Hebert's Meat Market sells their Turduckhen internationally. A major $$$ maker for them.
     
  7. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    Three-bird roasts in the UK are usually turkey, duck and chicken, never pigeon!
     
  8. Elawin

    Elawin Über Member

    I've thought of something! Illusion cakes! I've never been any good at decorating cakes; even a slightly decorated by otherwise fairly plain iced cake would be a vast improvement :laugh:
     
  9. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    What is an illusion cake? I'm not a great cake maker and I too haven't really mastered any fancy icing or cake decorating. The trouble is I've no reason to make such things as no-one here likes them
     
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  10. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    Yes...there are some things on my to-do list, and mostly it's down to simply setting aside enough time to do them:
    • Souffle
    • Salt-Crusted Fish
    • Paella
    • Cheese - yes, I know it's easy to make. But, I haven't yet tried.
    • Smoked food - I have put wood chips in a foil "boat" on my grill to smoke a partly-cooked brisket once, which certainly counts as smoking. But, I have yet to smoke something from beginning to end. I even have a smoker that I haven't put together yet. Even when I do, this will be a long time commitment keeping up the wood chips.The weather isn't cooperating now, either. so this might have to wait until the spring.
    • A good gluten-free bread - I have made gluten-free bread, but it wasn't very good.
    • Oxtail soup - this will have to wait until I can find oxtails!
    • Savory foams - I have a box of "charges", but no whipped cream canister. This seems pretty easy to fix, but it isn't high in my list.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
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  11. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    @The Late Night Gourmet

    Is your smoker wood fired or electric? If electric it does not take a lot of chips. You can get bags of chips all over. We like pecan and apple best. Sometimes hickory. I do not like mesquite. G has a gas grill. I found a chip box at Lowe's that he uses to add a little smoke flavor when grilling. Not true smoking. We use the electric smoker for venison sausage, smoked pork sausage and Tasso. When I find fryers on sale we will smoke some and freeze for making chicken and sausage gumbo. We smoke fresh ham when I find it on sale. I want to try home smoked bacon.

    G's buddy has a wood fired smoke house. Every February they have a "Smoke Fest". They smoke anything and everything and of course consume mass quantities of adult beverages. G's buddy even has t-shirts printed for their annual smoke fest.

    If your smoker is wood fired check with local arborist. They probably have to pay to dump and will be willing to give you both chips and logs - or sell them to you cheap.

    Caution - smoking is addictive! :laugh:
     
  12. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    I'd never heard of it, either, but here's what I found.

    http://www.goodtoknow.co.uk/recipes/549692/illusion-cakes

    The name seems apt. Here's one:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Senior Member Recipe Challenge Judge

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    It's an offset wood-fired smoker. Here's what mine looks like (or will look like when I put it together). I have no doubt I'll be able to make something amazing with it once I put the time into it:

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    Illusion cakes

    Beautiful - not something this non- baker would attempt.
     
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  15. ElizabethB

    ElizabethB Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Lafayette, LA. US
    @The Late Night Gourmet

    My brother has one like that. It really does not take a hug amount of wood. Find free.

    When using chips soak them in water. Squeeze out the excess water. If the chips are not soaked they will catch fire. Not what you want.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017

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