Building a Burger

Yorky

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I'm sure there is a thread of at least a similar title but for the life of me, I can't find it.

Anyway, here's mine.

Sourdough roll sliced in two (not three - I've found two easier to control during the biting process) slightly toasted with ketchup and a few sliced chillis to add a little fire.

1 s.jpg

Pork burger.

2 s.jpg

Pickled cucumber and shallots to add acidity and crunch.

3 s.jpg


Lid (precariously balanced).

5 s.jpg
 
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Toasting the bun is an important but underrated part of the operation. I want to crunch into what you posted...you made it very appetizing!

In fact, I brought a burger to lunch today. I will post my assembly process and the finished product, though it certainly won't look as nice as yours!
 
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Here's my lunch today. I have a potato roll sandwich bun, then add garlic paste, hummus, and a pickled red onion. While I did say that toasting the bun is important, I couldn't toast this one because the toaster at work is broken. I pickled the onion, but the sauces are leftovers from a middle-eastern restaurant.

IMG_1604.jpg

I made a chicken burger using ultra-lean chicken breast that I trimmed and ground myself. I added salt, pepper, and sumac to the seasoning. Those dark bits are chunks of mushroom that I added to provide moisture: a patty that lean would have been horrible without any fat. I use a large white mushroom for each 4 ounces of chicken, and the patty is always juicy and flavorful.

IMG_1606.jpg

Next, I used my favorite type of homemade kimchi: diakon radish. I decided to depart from my usual method of adding chili pepper flakes, and instead cut up a green Anaheim pepper to provide the heat. While the taste is terrific, the pepper contributed virtually no heat. It seems that the pepper flakes distribute the heat better, so I will go back to that next time.

IMG_1607.jpg

Finally, the burger is assembled.

IMG_1608.JPG
 

Yorky

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Next, I used my favorite type of homemade kimchi: diakon radish. I decided to depart from my usual method of adding chili pepper flakes, and instead cut up a green Anaheim pepper to provide the heat. While the taste is terrific, the pepper contributed virtually no heat. It seems that the pepper flakes distribute the heat better, so I will go back to that next time.
The anaheims that we can buy here are very mild. On the mild to hot ascending pepper scale we have available are capsicum, pepperocini, anaheim, jalapeño (rare), cayenne, Thai hot and prik kee noo (mouse droppings). I used the cayenne on my burger (same as I used in the kohlapuri) as the two hotter types tend to blow your head off.

chili-pepper-smiley.png
 
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The anaheims that we can buy here are very mild.
Didn't realize those were Anaheims...I thought they were jalapenos. I wonder why some places seem to get the green peppers while others get the more ripe (and hotter) ones. Even the red ones would be equivalent to a top-end jalapeno. I recall making that mistake when I decided to stuff red Fresno peppers: they were tasty, but also painful to eat (and painful later on when they worked their way through my system!!)
 

Yorky

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Didn't realize those were Anaheims...I thought they were jalapenos. I wonder why some places seem to get the green peppers while others get the more ripe (and hotter) ones. Even the red ones would be equivalent to a top-end jalapeno. I recall making that mistake when I decided to stuff red Fresno peppers: they were tasty, but also painful to eat (and painful later on when they worked their way through my system!!)
The ones on my burger were green cayennes. I came across green fresnos (I think - nothing is labeled here) a while ago but my experiment at stuffing them was not successful.

stuffed fresnos.jpg
 

epicuric

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One of my pet hates is an overfilled burger. I was presented with one a couple of days ago at a cafe bar. The burger pattie was lovely, but the amount of other stuff made it impossible to pick it up and eat it. Knife and fork job!
 

Yorky

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One of my pet hates is an overfilled burger. I was presented with one a couple of days ago at a cafe bar. The burger pattie was lovely, but the amount of other stuff made it impossible to pick it up and eat it. Knife and fork job!
Something like this?

calories.jpg
 

CraigC

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We are more likely to make sliders these days. One of my favorites is to make the mixture for meatball banh mi and make slider patties with it. I use the condiments that go with the banh mi sandwiches as well. I'll do the same with the Italian meatball recipe I use and serve with marinara sauce and parmesan or pecorino. Of course Martin's potato buns are a must.
 
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