Recipe Chicken Canadian Bacon Egg Shingles

flyinglentris

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Chicken Canadian Bacon Egg Shingles:

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Ingredients:

1) Bread, dill rye - 1 slice
2) Eggs - 2
3) Chicken half breast - 1
4) Canadian bacon - 2 slices
5) Lettuce - as required
6) Onion - 2 slice(s) or as desired
7) Tomato - 1
8) Mayonnaise - as desired
9) Shredded cheese - 1/8 cup or as desired.
10) Black pepper - as desired


Procedure:

-- Preparation --

1) Chop the chicken half breast into small pieces or shred.
2) Slice off two slices of onion.
3) Slice longways, the tomato.
4) Cut the slice of dill rye in half.

NOTE: Often rye bread is long and has a short height. Cutting a slice in half should allow a shingle base to fit the stack that will cover them.

5) Pan fry the chicken pieces until they are browned.
6) Pan fry the Canadian bacon and melt the cheese on top of each slice.
7) Fry the two eggs sunny-side up, preferably in muffin rings.

-- Making the Shingles --

8) Spread mayonnaise on each rye shingle.
9) Plate the rye bread shingles.
10) Cover the shingles with lettuce, then onion, then tomato.
11) Add the chicken over the shingles.
12) Top with the Canadian bacon slices covered with melted cheese.
13) Add the sunny side up eggs on the top of the stack.

NOTE: If preferred, break the yolks and let them run.

14) Sprinkle on black pepper.
15) Serve.
 

Morning Glory

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I'd never heard of 'shingles' as a culinary term. I've now learned its a US military term for some sort of gravy poured over toast (known as SOS). So, the toast is the 'shingle'. In this case rye bread (un-toasted) is the 'shingle'. Did I get that right?

Its a great little stack of ingredients here and I do like the idea of the dill rye bread with the ingredients. What is on the side?
 

flyinglentris

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I'd never heard of 'shingles' as a culinary term. I've now learned its a US military term for some sort of gravy poured over toast (known as SOS). So, the toast is the 'shingle'. In this case rye bread (un-toasted) is the 'shingle'. Did I get that right?

Its a great little stack of ingredients here and I do like the idea of the dill rye bread with the ingredients. What is on the side?

You got that right.

On the side, I have hash brown potatoes mixed with onion and Serrano pepper, and topped with cayenne hot sauce. Lots of folks like cayenne hot sauce on eggs and hash browns and it is always available in restaurants that serve breakfast items.
 

FoodFighter

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I believe the "$hit" is creamed chipped beef.
Chipped Beef is very thin slices of salted, smoked beef, it's really low end stuff.. It is not as dry as beef jerky, and doesn’t have as much fat.
 

flyinglentris

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I believe the "$hit" is creamed chipped beef.
Chipped Beef is very thin slices of salted, smoked beef, it's really low end stuff.. It is not as dry as beef jerky, and doesn’t have as much fat.

Yes, that is what it is. But anything may be served open face on a shingle (slice of bread).
 

FoodFighter

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Yes, that is what it is. But anything may be served open face on a shingle (slice of bread).
You're right, anything could be served on toast.

The first published recipe for S.O.S is the Army version, which calls for chipped beef, a dried meat product perfectly designed for the battlefield. Indeed, the version of S.O.S. in the Manual for Army Cooks, 1910 also uses evaporated milk, which would have been easier to transport, shelf stable, and (at the time) safer to consume than fresh milk. In fact, in a pinch the entire dish can be made from the pantry if fresh butter is removed in favor of a more shelf-stable fat (such as lard) and beef stock is substituted with water.
 
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