Condiment Sauces

flyinglentris

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Condiment sauces, for me, are those sauces that can be applied directly to food items. They are often available in bottles at the table. Some condiment sauces can be used as marinades or as dressing or ingredients to mix with other things.

The more common condiment sauces are probably mustards, catsup and mayonnaise.

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I'm not a big catsup fan.

So salsas are a good substitute condiment where I might have used catsup.

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I also like cayenne pepper sauce, of which, there are many varieties.

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flyinglentris

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There are a wide range of steak and other meat condiments, such as A-1 steak sauce, Heinz 57 sauce, etc.

I do use soy sauce a lot.

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One of my favorite meat sauces is Pickapeppa.

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Terryaki sauce is good on meats, like this orange terryaki sauce I created.

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Something that is a bit more rare, is tonkatsu sauce.

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For sandwiches, I love to use horseradish sauce.

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Deep fried fish is favored by malt vinegars.

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Mirin is a sauce that often shows up as a condiment or condiment ingredient for Japanese foods.

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Mountain Cat

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In addition to a lot of the Asian sauces, I am fond of the somewhat-unpronounceable Worcestershire sauce. I also enjoy horseradish sauce - which has a mayo background.

I haven't bought ketchup / catsup for at least 15 years. If I do a grilling session involving burgers/dogs for friends in the future, I will pick up a bottle for those who feel they need it for burgers or hot dogs. (I usually grill other things.) Said guests will have the option to decide who gets to take the remainder home. Stuff is too sugary for me.
 

caseydog

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In addition to a lot of the Asian sauces, I am fond of the somewhat-unpronounceable Worcestershire sauce. I also enjoy horseradish sauce - which has a mayo background.

I haven't bought ketchup / catsup for at least 15 years. If I do a grilling session involving burgers/dogs for friends in the future, I will pick up a bottle for those who feel they need it for burgers or hot dogs. (I usually grill other things.) Said guests will have the option to decide who gets to take the remainder home. Stuff is too sugary for me.

Worcestershire is not that hard to pronounce, as long as you don't pay attention to the spelling. :laugh: Living in Massachusetts, I figured you already know how to pronounce those old English words (town names).

CD
 

Morning Glory

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I am fond of the somewhat-unpronounceable Worcestershire sauce
Worcestershire is not that hard to pronounce, as long as you don't pay attention to the spelling

Well, the way I say it and the way a lot of Brits do is 'wooster' - an abbreviation of the whole word. The woos part rhymes with 'puss' (not pronounced as in 'booster').

Add the 'shire' part if you want (I never do) - but in the UK its not pronounced to rhyme with 'spire'. Its pronounced 'sher' to rhyme with 'her'.
 

TastyReuben

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Well, the way I say it and the way a lot of Brits do is 'wooster' - an abbreviation of the whole word. The woos part rhymes with 'puss' (not pronounced as in 'booster').

Add the 'shire' part if you want (I never do) - but in the UK its not pronounced to rhyme with 'spire'. Its pronounced 'sher' to rhyme with 'her'.
I've never had an issue with it either way:

Wore - stir - sure. Easy!

We have a town named Wooster not terribly far away.
 

karadekoolaid

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Easy peasyWorcestershire !!
Or you could call it Lea & P.
I swear the formula has changed over the past years, though.

Anyhow - tomato ketchup, mayo, mustard, soy sauce - that´s about it for my house. Having had a conserves company for 10 years or so, anything different got made: teryaki sauce, ketjap manis, ancient mustard, tamarind chutney ( lots of similarities to HP Brown Sauce!) and every hot sauce in the world. My signature sauces were C4, Volcanic Hot Sauce and Caribbean Hot sauce. Red, orange and yellow!
 

Mountain Cat

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Worcestershire is not that hard to pronounce, as long as you don't pay attention to the spelling. :laugh: Living in Massachusetts, I figured you already know how to pronounce those old English words (town names).

CD
Yes. actually I can pronounce it - but in order to spell it - as well as the town of Worchester more towards eastern Massachusetts, I have to mentally mis-pronounce it in order to do so. If I say "Wooster" to myself, I'm going to be spelling it that way!
 

karadekoolaid

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Nah - that sounds Americanised. The 'sher'' is too soft and long. :)
Suppose it depends where you come from in England. If it were West country, there might be a heavy roll on the ...rrrrr.
If it were London, it´d probably be "shu".
And I dread to think how a Brummie might say it.
 

Morning Glory

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Suppose it depends where you come from in England. If it were West country, there might be a heavy roll on the ...rrrrr.
If it were London, it´d probably be "shu".
And I dread to think how a Brummie might say it.

I knew you would say that. I thought about it as I wrote and you are right. Nevertheless the example provided had a definite American sound.

However, I love a Brummie accent. Long live British regional accents, I say! I expect that everyone in the UK will be speaking a version of estuary/American English by 2040. Its already happening. Nevertheless, I live in hope.

Talking of condiments, I've ordered a mushroom ketchup Ocado. This one:

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I also have a few ideas for making one from scratch.
 

caseydog

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Well, the way I say it and the way a lot of Brits do is 'wooster' - an abbreviation of the whole word. The woos part rhymes with 'puss' (not pronounced as in 'booster').

Add the 'shire' part if you want (I never do) - but in the UK its not pronounced to rhyme with 'spire'. Its pronounced 'sher' to rhyme with 'her'.

I pronounce it Wuss-tuh-sure. Pretty close to what you describe. I was born in Worcester county, New Jersey, so pronouncing Worcester(shire) was taught to me very early in life.

CD
 

rascal

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I buy it in 5 litre plastic containers, I get through about 1 a year. I’m using it tonight on my tea. I’ll use about two tablespoons and about 4 tablespoons of tomato sauce. Around home I call it Wooster but if I’m entertaining I use the the full version.

Russ
 

flyinglentris

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I have been trying to find, with no luck, a sauce called naranja agria, - sour orange sauce. Everywhere I look for this, it is out of stock or very over priced.
 
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