Recipe Egg Sushi (Tomago Nigiri, Egg Uramaki Rolls and Egg Temaki Rolls)

flyinglentris

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Egg Sushi (Tomago Nigiri, Egg Uramaki Rolls and Egg Temaki Rolls):

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Ingredients:

1) Egg, divided - 2
2) Nori (seaweed sheets), divided - 2 sheets
3) Bacon, divided - 1 to 2 strips
4) Sushi grade rice, divided - 1 cup
5) Sake, cooking (Miri) - 1 tsp.
6) Powdered Sugar - 3 tsps.
7) Tobiko (flying fish roe) - as required
8) Wasabi paste, divided - as desired
9) Soy sauce - as required
10) Water - 1-1/4 cup.


Procedure:

-- Preparation --

1) Rinse the rice in cold water until the water is clear.
2) Boil the rice in a rice-cooker.

NOTE: A rice-cooker is highly recommended. The rice can be cooked stove top, if necessary. Cook at about 175 to 200F, enough to steam the rice with a lid on. Stir often, if cooking rice on the stove top and add a trickle of water, if necessary.

3) Break up any rice chunks after transferring the rice to bowl.
4) Whisk the egg with powdered sugar and cooking sake.
5) Oil a baking pan, pour in the egg.
6) Pre-heat the oven to 350F.
7) Bake the egg till it appears done, 20 to 30 minutes.

NOTE: The egg should not wobble, if done.

8) Let the egg cool and let the rice cool so that both can be handled.
9) Fry the bacon.
10) Chop the bacon into bits.

-- Tomago Nigiri --

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11) Form two oval rice balls about 1-1/2" long and 1" wide.
12) Top each ball with a dab of wasabi paste.
13) Cut two slices of tomago egg about 1-3/4 to 2" long and 1" wide.
14) Cut two 1/2" wide by 2" long strips of nori.
15) Lay the egg slices on top of each rice ball.
16) Wet the nori and carefully wrap it around the center of each piece.
17) Set aside while working on the other sushi items.

-- Egg Uramaki Rolls --

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18) Lay a piece of parchment paper over a bamboo sushi mat.

NOTE: Step 18 is not necessary, but will keep the mat clean without requiring the issue of washing it. Plastic may be used, instead of parchment paper.

19) Fold a nori sheet in half to allow breaking it cleanly into two smaller sheets.
20) Spread the rice over the parchment paper covered sushi mat.

NOTE: Spread the rice about the length of the nori sheet length.

21) Lay the nori sheets on the rice.
22) Crumble egg and bacon bits along the center line of the mat.
23) Carefully roll the matt while apply firm pressure.

NOTE: Do roll the matt back onto itself. Roll the matt only enough to connect both sides of the rice into a closed roll.

24) Carefully seal the roll by tamping the edges of the rice together.

NOTE: If necessary, use additional rice to fill in the gap.

25) Sprinkle tobiko over the outside surface of the roll.
26) Turn the roll as needed to cover it completely with tobiko.

NOTE: Apply a small amount of pressure to ensure the tobiko sticks.

27) Wet a sushi knife or other knife with water to lessen sticking.
28) Cut across the roll at 1" intervals and separate each piece.
29) Set aside while working on the temaki.


-- Egg Temaki Rolls --

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30) Lay a clean piece of parchment paper over the bamboo sushi mat.

NOTE: Step 30 is not necessary, but will keep the mat clean without requiring the issue of washing it. Plastic may be used, instead of parchment paper.

31) Fold a nori sheet in half to allow breaking it cleanly into two smaller sheets.
32) Wet the long edges of the nori sheets as they are used.
33) Lay the nori sheets in turn, onto the parchment covered mat.
34) Cover the sheet evenly with rice.
35) Crumble egg and bacon bits along the center line of the matt.
36) Carefully roll the matt to form the roll.

NOTE: Do not roll the matt over upon itself. Roll carefully, apply slight pressure to close the roll, allowing the wetted edge of the nori sheet to seal the roll.

37) Wet a sushi knife or other knife with water to lessen sticking.
38) Cut across the roll at 1" intervals to separate each piece.
39) Set aside, until ready to serve the sushi.

-- Serving --

40) Add wasabi to a small spice dish(es).
41) Add soy sauce to a small spice dish(es).
42) Place ginger into a small spice dish(es).

NOTE: Using sushi plates is optional. Geta plate/boards are more applicable when several pieces of sushi are served at the same time. Here, the geta boards will be used.

43) Set up each geta board to allow placing the sushi pieces on them.
44) Arrange the tomago nigiri, uramaki rolls and temaki rolls in a pleasing way on the geta boards.
45) Provide chop sticks and arrange the wasabi, soy sauce and ginger bowls in an accessible and visually pleasing way.
 
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Morning Glory

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I'm not a fan of sushi which I always think is style over substance, fiddly and too much rice! Having said that, you have clearly put a lot of work into this and I'd certainly be happy to do a 'taste test'. Well done.
 

flyinglentris

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I'm not a fan of sushi which I always think is style over substance, fiddly and too much rice! Having said that, you have clearly put a lot of work into this and I'd certainly be happy to do a 'taste test'. Well done.

I, like many others, love sushi.

There is a way to eat sushi, involving the wasabi, soy sauce and ginger. The wasabi is mixed into the soy sauce and the sushi is dipped, before consuming. Wasabi has the characteristic of giving off an 'essence' that can sting the linings of your sinuses when mixed with a liquid. And some people like that, others mix less wasabi with the soy sauce. It's all part of the sushi flavor experience. The ginger is a palate cleanser, to be nipped at between trying different sushi pieces.
 

JAS_OH1

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I'm not a fan of sushi which I always think is style over substance, fiddly and too much rice! Having said that, you have clearly put a lot of work into this and I'd certainly be happy to do a 'taste test'. Well done.
My husband plays poker with a guy who owns and operates a sushi restaurant with his brothers. They really know how to make sushi in excellent proportion with less rice and more seafood, but it still looks and tastes amazing. I am partial to the eel (cooked), white tuna nigiri, and salmon nigiri in particular. I am okay with the ginger but love love love wasabi and soy sauce. I keep them in my pantry.
 

flyinglentris

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My husband plays poker with a guy who owns and operates a sushi restaurant with his brothers. They really know how to make sushi in excellent proportion with less rice and more seafood, but it still looks and tastes amazing. I am partial to the eel (cooked), white tuna nigiri, and salmon nigiri in particular. I am okay with the ginger but love love love wasabi and soy sauce. I keep them in my pantry.

My favorite nigiri sushi list is toro, ama ebi, tako, ika, sake, mirugai, unagi and uni.

Temaki sushi is usually limited to tuna, tekkamaki and I'll have it, but it doesn't set as spectacular with me. Gunkan Temaki is a good one that I like.

Uramki that like includes spider rolls, salmon rolls and shrimp rolls.

Futomaki is something that I take as it comes in a Japanese restaurant.
 

JAS_OH1

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My favorite nigiri sushi list is toro, ama ebi, tako, ika, sake, mirugai, unagi and uni.

Temaki sushi is usually limited to tuna, tekkamaki and I'll have it, but it doesn't set as spectacular with me. Gunkan Temaki is a good one that I like.

Uramki that like includes spider rolls, salmon rolls and shrimp rolls.

Futomaki is something that I take as it comes in a Japanese restaurant.
My father was an AF Colonel and we lived on the island of Okinawa during the latter part of the Vietnam war. Our housekeeper and seamstress fed me sashimi, various types of seaweed dishes, noodle dishes, fish head soup, etc. but no sushi. They generally would eat rice by itself, not sure if that's typical of how other Okinawans ate too. Okinawan cuisine is a bit different from mainland Japanese food. I do have an appreciation for raw fish but not so much the rice. It's just too much.
 

garlichead

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My father was an AF Colonel and we lived on the island of Okinawa during the latter part of the Vietnam war. Our housekeeper and seamstress fed me sashimi, various types of seaweed dishes, noodle dishes, fish head soup, etc. but no sushi. They generally would eat rice by itself, not sure if that's typical of how other Okinawans ate too. Okinawan cuisine is a bit different from mainland Japanese food. I do have an appreciation for raw fish but not so much the rice. It's just too much.
Interesting, thanks for the snapshot of the typical Okinawan diet.
 

Mountain Cat

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My husband plays poker with a guy who owns and operates a sushi restaurant with his brothers. They really know how to make sushi in excellent proportion with less rice and more seafood, but it still looks and tastes amazing. I am partial to the eel (cooked), white tuna nigiri, and salmon nigiri in particular. I am okay with the ginger but love love love wasabi and soy sauce. I keep them in my pantry.

I love sushi -- I really really miss a GOOD sushi restaurant up here. My favorites generally are the (cooked) eel and the raw yellowtail. I also love the salmon. I liked the white "tuna" but it reacts with my gut badly, so I won't be eating that one again.

I loved it when my favorite sushi place down in Connecticut would bring in unique fishes and other seafood to try. Red snapper is quite good. I don't eat the bluefin tuna due to severe overfishing any more, but I do recall liking that one a lot way back when.

Yes, less rice and more seafood!
 

flyinglentris

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I love sushi -- I really really miss a GOOD sushi restaurant up here. My favorites generally are the (cooked) eel and the raw yellowtail. I also love the salmon. I liked the white "tuna" but it reacts with my gut badly, so I won't be eating that one again.

I loved it when my favorite sushi place down in Connecticut would bring in unique fishes and other seafood to try. Red snapper is quite good. I don't eat the bluefin tuna due to severe overfishing any more, but I do recall liking that one a lot way back when.

Yes, less rice and more seafood!

Yes, I love sushi too, and have not had it in a restaurant in a while. I often frequented a floating boat restaurant, but here in Silicon Valley, there are some really classy Japanese restaurants, very classy, and good food.

I'm happy to have made my first sushi and intend to make more.
 
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