Recipe Fiery Stuffed Poblanos

Discussion in 'Vegetarian and Vegan' started by CraigC, Mar 10, 2019.

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  1. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member

    Location:
    SE Florida
    Poblano peppers (fresh version of the ancho) can be as mild as a green bell or as spicy as a serrano. We also use them for Green Chili Stew and enchilada sauce.

    Ingredients
    8 large poblano peppers
    1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
    1 medium zucchini, chopped
    1 small red onion, chopped
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 can (15-1/4 ounces) whole kernel corn, drained
    1 can (14-1/2 ounces) fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained
    1 cup cooked brown rice
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    1 to 1-1/2 teaspoons ground ancho chili pepper
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend, divided
    3 green onions, chopped
    1/2 cup sour cream

    Directions
    1) Broil peppers 3 in. from heat until skins blister, about 5 minutes. With tongs, rotate peppers a quarter turn. Broil and rotate until all sides are blistered and blackened. Immediately place peppers in a large bowl; cover and let stand for 20 minutes. This can also be done on an outdoor grill and the blackened peppers can be placed in a plastic bag.
    2) Meanwhile, in a small bowl, coarsely mash beans; set aside.
    3) In a large nonstick skillet, cook and stir zucchini and onion until tender.
    4) Add garlic; cook 1 minute longer.
    5) Add corn, tomatoes, rice, seasonings and beans. Remove from heat; stir in 1/2 cup cheese. Set aside.
    6) Preheat oven to 375°. Peel charred skins from poblanos and discard. Cut a lengthwise slit through each pepper, leaving stem intact; discard membranes and seeds.
    7) Spoon 2/3 cup filling into each pepper.
    8) Place peppers in a 13x9-in. baking dish coated with cooking spray. Bake until heated through, 18-22 minutes, sprinkling with green onions and remaining cheese during last 5 minutes of baking. Serve with sour cream.
     
  2. TodayInTheKitchen

    TodayInTheKitchen Active Member

    Location:
    Detroit, MI
    Every tried leaving the charred skins on?
     
  3. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member

    Location:
    SE Florida
    I leave some on when making some kinds of salsas, but never on stuffed fresh chilis or chili rellenos. I do batches of Hatch chilis when in season and never leave the skin on.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  4. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Great recipe and vegetarian too (it had a tag as vegan which it isn't but it could fairly easily be made vegan). When I char peppers I always leave some little pieces of the blackened skins but not all.

    Its not at all common to find poblano peppers in the UK. In fact I'm not sure I've ever had a fresh one. How big are they on average?
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  5. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Über Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    Here's a handy image showing size - and Scoville scale - comparison:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Thank you - I see they are quite large. I like the idea of a large chilli which can be spicy. I've definitely never had one of these. I suppose I'll have to go to a specialist grower in the UK or grow my own!
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  7. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Über Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    I have honestly never had what I would call a spicy poblano. The flesh tastes a lot like a less sweet bell, and the seeds are at best a whisper of heat, to remind you that it’s a pepper.

    When I made the pickled peppers recently, I used an equal amount of poblanos and Anaheim chiles, but the Anaheims do all the heavy lifting. And, it works: there’s enough heat in the Anaheim’s, combined with apple cider vinegar, to make everything a very nice level of spicy. It won’t kill you, so you can actually taste the food you’re putting it on.

    @CraigC: how can you tell if a poblano is toward the spicy end of the scale? They all look the same shade of dark green to me. By the way, dang good recipe.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  8. rascal

    rascal Senior Member

    I found that charring peppers for my hot chilly sauce, I peeled about 50% of the burnt char off. The bit that was left with char gave it a smokey taste to the sauce.

    Rus
     
  9. The Late Night Gourmet

    The Late Night Gourmet Über Member

    Location:
    Detroit, USA
    I agree, but I also understand wanting a cleaner flavor by rubbing the char off. Having said that, I’ve always been too lazy to do that. So, I also embrace the smoky characteristic. :cool:
     
  10. rascal

    rascal Senior Member

    First year I made if with char peeled off , the next year 50/50 char and everyone agreed second batch was the best. My wife grows our own chillies
     
  11. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member

    Location:
    SE Florida
    Its the luck of the draw when buying them and you won't know until you taste a piece after they are roasted.:ohmy:
     
  12. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I've drawn a blank sourcing them in the UK - I can get (and have) the dried poblanos (Anchos) but other than tinned (very expensive) I can't seem to get the green fresh poblano.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  13. CraigC

    CraigC Senior Member

    Location:
    SE Florida
    I've never tried making them, but you can reconstitute the anchos and stuff them. I've seen recipes for doing so.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  14. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I should think that could be delicious - although quite different from poblanos. Anchos have that lovely deep fruity chilli flavour.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.
  15. epicuric

    epicuric Über Member Staff Member

    Location:
    Shropshire, UK
    I think we are a bit backward in the UK when it comes to peppers/chilli's. ("chilli" or "chili"?) Labelling in supermarkets seldom extends beyond "pepper", "sweet pepper", "mixed chilli's". At the market I can get Scotch bonnets, birds eyes and jalapeños, but that's about it. I do have some dried anchos, but I've no idea why.
     
    TodayInTheKitchen likes this.

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