Fontina

Morning Glory

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I noticed that Fontina cheese is often included in US recipes. In the UK its very difficult to obtain unless you go to a specialist cheese shop. Its an Italian cheese which has DPO status so in Europe it can only be sold as Fontina if it is made in Italy in the Aosta Valley (from specific cows milk).

Fontina - Wikipedia

Fontina cheese has been made in the Aosta Valley, in the Alps since the 12th century. It has a milk fat content around 45%. It can be identified by a Consortium stamp of the Matterhorn including the script "FONTINA".
I am wondering how much it is used in recipes in Italy and also whether I will ever get to taste it. It sounds very lovely with earthy mushroom flavours...

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Milk is delivered directly from the pasture to the creamery, where large copper cauldrons are filled and heated. Enzymes and calf rennet is added to promote coagulation of the milk, resulting in the formation of curd. When firm, it is then separated and drained through a cheesecloth, before being placed in wheel-shaped moulds. After it has brined for 2 months, the wheel is ready for aging in the caverns of Valle d'Aosta. A process of pure artisanship, workers tend to the cheeses by turning, brushing and salting them every other day. After 3 months maturing in the humid grottos, the cheese is officially labelled Fontina.
fontina-cheese
 

Mountain Cat

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I know that the US is one of the few countries that can sell Parmesan cheese that isn't produced in the region of Italy where Parmigiano Reggiano is native, and yet still call it that. Without getting slammed down legally. Possibly, and if so, unfortunately, this may also be true of Fontina cheese. This is new to me, if this is so. Personally, I'll now be looking for the REAL stuff, in the case that's not what I've been eating.

Love to hear more about this on this thread.
 

medtran49

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There are Danish and Canadian (I believe) fontinas as well. Neither of them look or taste like the description given.

We also have fontinella, which is a harder cheese, not as hard as parm, but harder than fontina.
 
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caseydog

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Fontina is used quite a bit here, although I have never cooked with it. I have probably had it in a restaurant in something, but can't think of an example from memory. The Kroger Signature store me has a pretty large artisanal cheese section. I'll have to look for it.

CD
 

TastyReuben

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I use it, mixed with Gruyere, with French onion soup, and I've used it in fondue. It's also just fine on pizza, especially mixed in with some mozz.

Mostly, though, I just snack on it.
 

Mountain Cat

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I use Fontina in omelets - actually, I use any melty cheese in omelets, except American cheeze (product). I mix it with a stronger cheese like Gruyere in quiche. Or, like Tasty, for just gnoshing.
 
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