Fortified Wines

impish

Regular Member
Joined
20 Dec 2018
Messages
91
Location
West-Central Arizona, USA
Many years ago, living in my birthplace outside of Chicago, I became acquainted by accident with a most-delicious wine imported from Sicily. It's name was "Sicilian Gold". There was also a competitor, imported from Italy, I think, named "Gold Drops Mandorcreama".

After moving out West, I was never able to find it anywhere. Hard to imagine such delicious product was not sold nation-wide. Ever hear of either?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Messages
29,831
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
Can I deviate a bit from whisky? Many years ago, living in my birthplace outside of Chicago, I became acquainted by accident with a most-delicious wine imported from Sicily. It's name was "Sicilian Gold". There was also a competitor, imported from Italy, I think, named "Gold Drops Mandorcreama".

After moving out West, I was never able to find it anywhere. Hard to imagine such delicious product was not sold nation-wide. Ever hear of either?
Everything you need to know here about Sicilian Gold! We are talking marsala - so a sweet fortified wine. https://winevaultllc.com/affiliates/sicilian-gold/

It seems you can still get it.
 
Last edited:

MrsDangermouse

Über Member
Joined
30 Nov 2012
Messages
582
Location
Hampshire, UK
We love fortified wine in this house, our favourites are port, commandaria and pineau des charentes. I quite like sherry too but for some reason never think of drinking it.

Whilst the red ports are generally drunk at cool room temperature after a meal, pink (rosé) and white ports make a great aperitif (served cold, maybe with 1 cube of ice). Its our tradition on holiday and on summer weekends to always observe Apero time :cheers:

Commandaria is quite difficult to get hold of outside of Cyprus so we don't get to drink it very often - if you've never tried it, it reminds me in some ways of a tawny port. And pineau des charentes is something we only discovered last year when we stayed in the grounds of a Cognac distillery. Its apparently very popular in the mid-western part of France but not we've not found it that easy to find outside the area. The white version is our favourite, and the rosé is also nice. Not so keen on red though.
 

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Messages
29,831
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
What does fortified actually mean?
Good question. The word 'fortified' means just that - a defence in case of attack (a fort for example!). In other words its something which is strengthened. In terms of wine it means wine with something stronger added in making it - usually a spirit such as brandy.
 

Duck59

Veteran
Staff member
Joined
23 Apr 2015
Messages
2,110
Location
Fife, Scotland
Website
duckholiday.com
The drink of choice for that section of the Scottish population known as neds is Buckfast. This is a fortified wine from Devon and is made by monks. Quite how it gained its popularity here, I really cannot say.

For the unitiated, a ned is a young person of antisocial tendencies, which generally involves drinking, gratuitous violence and pretty much anything that offends most people.
 

morning glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Messages
29,831
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
The drink of choice for that section of the Scottish population known as neds is Buckfast. This is a fortified wine from Devon and is made by monks. Quite how it gained its popularity here, I really cannot say.

For the unitiated, a ned is a young person of antisocial tendencies, which generally involves drinking, gratuitous violence and pretty much anything that offends most people.
Blimey! Its not exactly a hip drink - I remember it from my childhood. It was known as a 'tonic' which meant that apparently teetotal (usually older) women were happy to buy it and drink it by day at home if they felt 'under the weather'. Maybe they didn't realise. Or maybe they did...
 

Duck59

Veteran
Staff member
Joined
23 Apr 2015
Messages
2,110
Location
Fife, Scotland
Website
duckholiday.com
Hmm, goes on a bit, doesn't he? A tad Weegie-centric, too. I'd be happy if it was just a west of Scotland phenomenon, but it isn't. A stroll to the paper shop on a Sunday morning in my town usually involves walking past a discarded Buckie bottle or two.

And you never see them on the shelves with other wine. They're always behind the counter. As our man mentioned, it's not loony strength and another thing is that it's not even that cheap. Admittedly, it doesn't cost a fortune, but it's pricier than a good few wines.
 
Top Bottom