Recipe Indian Chutney

epicuric

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INDIAN CHUTNEY

A rich, sweet chutney that goes well with cheese and cold meats.

1lb/450g apples, peeled, cored and chopped
1lb/450g onions, peeled and chopped
1lb/450g ripe tomatoes
1lb/450 raisins
1lb/450g sultanas
1lb/450g brown sugar
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 ½ tsp fresh curry powder
2oz/50g salt
¾ pint/450ml malt vinegar


Mix the spices into the vinegar. Put all the ingredients into a large pan and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally. Once the mixture is boiling, turn it down the heat and simmer gently for about an hour. Bring back to the boil, and stir until the mixture is thick and brown. Decant into warm sterilised jars.
 

lastmanstanding

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Ambarella (Spondias dulcis) instead of apple would also be great I think. We make a chutney similar to this but without sultana etc. And we add a little bit of cinnamon too. :) Your recipe must be much more flavourful. I must make it.
 

lastmanstanding

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I had to look that up! Seems an interesting and very useful fruit, and I'm sure it would be a great substitute for apple - a flavour somewhere between pineapple and mango I read?
Rightly said. The well-ripe fruits are sweet, standing between pineapple and mango we can say, while the unripe ones are sour but with a hint of sweetness which makes it a decadent taste especially for kids.
Although they are sold at supermarkets and city fairs this fruit is freely available in the countryside here.
 

Morning Glory

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Rightly said. The well-ripe fruits are sweet, standing between pineapple and mango we can say, while the unripe ones are sour but with a hint of sweetness which makes it a decadent taste especially for kids.
Although they are sold at supermarkets and city fairs this fruit is freely available in the countryside here.

How interesting. They remind me of Greengages which are also a type of plum. See here:

Recipe - Greengage, Feta & Honey Tart
 
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