Recipe Marinated beef with leek and spicy rice

Hemulen

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Marinated beef with leek and spicy rice
beef_2.jpg

Serves 5-6 | Marinating overnight, Preparation & cooking 30-40 min

This dish contains shallot, garlic and leek. The nigella seeds (Nigella sativa L.) mimic the tone of roasted onions. The abundant vinegar and a spoonful of sugar give the beef a Teriyaki type flavor. The precooked, tender leek adds uncluttered simplicity and the sweet & sour rice and sweet kiwi fruit complement the acerbic, rich tones.

Ingredients / Marinated Beef
1000 g (2.2 lb/35.3 oz) beef entrecôte/rib/Scotch fillet​
200 ml sunflower oil or olive oil​
200 ml balsamic vinegar or red wine vinegar​
250 g (0.55 lb/8.8 oz) shallots​
3 cloves of garlic​
1 tablespoon caster sugar​
3 teaspoons cumin/jeera​
2 teaspoons thyme​
2 teaspoons lemon juice​
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper​
1 teaspoon black pepper​
2-3 teaspoons salt​
Ingredients / Spicy Rice
375 g (0.8 lb/13.2 oz) basmati or jasmine rice​
2 tablespoons evoo​
7-9 cloves of garlic​
1 red chil(l)i pepper​
1 orange bell pepper​
1 teaspoon nigella seeds​
A 5 cm (2”) piece of turmeric root or 1 teaspoon turmeric powder​
1 teaspoon thyme​
3 teaspoons lemon juice​
1.5-2 teaspoons salt​
The Rest of the Ingredients
1 leek​
1 (yellow) kiwi fruit​
2 teaspoons butter​

Instructions

Tap dry and clean the beef. Discard the possible silver skin, excess fat and tough/chewy tendons and cut the meat into thin steaks and/or (flat) bits and pieces. Prepare the marinade. Cut the shallots and garlic cloves into halves, squeeze the lemon juice and mix all ingredients in a sturdy plastic bag. Add the meat and marinate overnight in the fridge.

Wipe off most of the marinade, line a baking tray with foil, scatter/arrange the meat on top and let it rest while you prepare the leek. Cut off the tough green parts of the leek, halve lengthwise, rinse well and steam for 10-15 minutes. Cook the rice at the same time. Set the grill/broil resistor of the oven to 225°C (430-440°F, gas mark 7/8, no fan).

Place the leek bits next to the meat and drizzle them with the beef marinade. Grill/broil in the oven (next to the resistor) for 6-8 minutes. Flip the meat bits and cook for 5-7 minutes more. (The balsamic-marinated beef is so hung/precooked that there is not point in trying to leave the meat medium rare). Meanwhile, chop the garlic, pepper and chili for the spicy rice. Sauté the pepper, chili, turmeric, nigella seeds and thyme in oil on medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir fry 2-3 minutes more. Add a tablespoon of honey, the lemon juice and salt, mix and let simmer/caramelize for 2-3 minutes. Drain the rice and combine with the spice mix. Just for eye candy and more sweet’n’sour, slice the kiwi fruit and fry/sauté it (one side) quickly in butter on high heat until slightly browned.

Cut the meat into slivers and serve on top of rice. Garnish with leek and fried kiwi fruit. Serve green salad on the side and add a spoonful of aioli or sour cream if you prefer.

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Last edited:

Morning Glory

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This is an attractive dish with a great combination of sweet and sour. Leeks, of course have a mellow sweetness of there own which I can imagine would work very well with the tangy marinated beef.

Set the grill/broil resistor of the oven to 225°C (430-440°F, gas mark 7/8, no fan).

I note you often mention the grill broil 'resistor' in recipes. Its not a term I'm familiar with. I'm assuming you mean the overhead grill (broiler in the US) at the top of the oven (some ovens have separate grills), which has a separate function from the oven itself. In the UK at least, the grill is not normally marked with precise temperature settings other than low, medium, high etc. So when I see temperatures listed I usually assume its referring to the oven itself not the grill. I just wanted to clarify that you did mean that you grilled the beef and leeks - as in placing under an overhead grill.

Just for eye candy and more sweet’n’sour, slice the kiwi fruit and fry/sauté it (one side) quickly in butter on high heat until slightly browned.

I wonder if it would look pretty to blow torch the kiwi - I've not tried it but it produces very pretty (and tasty) results with oranges, lemons and limes.

Minor criticism of the top photo - its a great shot but makes the beef look rather dried out. The beef looks more succulent in the shots below.
 

Hemulen

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Yes, I did grill the beef and leeks under an overhead grill (quite next to it) - and I could have added some of the natural juices of the beef on top of the dish to make it look a bit more moist. I don't own a blow-torch. I'm sure it would produce a more visible and appealing browning effect on kiwi fruit as well. It took quite a long time to achieve even a slight tone on the skillet (on high heat).

Regular, floor level stove/range & oven combos - and even the more contemporary ovens set on working height and/or integrated into the kitchen cabinets - usually include a visible grill resistor in Finland. The lower resistor is normally built in (set under the ceramic coating) but the upper one is bare; unprotected and visible. The upper resistor can be turned on on itself to produce radiating heat straight downwards: mimicing grilling/roasting/barbecue/broiling over barbecue coils or gas burners; just upside down. The grill resistor can be set to any oven temperature (50 - 275°C) - not just low, medium or high.

hella_.PNG
 

TastyReuben

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Yes, I did grill the beef and leeks under an overhead grill (quite next to it) - and I could have added some of the natural juices of the beef on top of the dish to make it look a bit more moist. I don't own a blow-torch. I'm sure it would produce a more visible and appealing browning effect on kiwi fruit as well. It took quite a long time to achieve even a slight tone on the skillet (on high heat).

Regular, floor level stove/range & oven combos - and even the more contemporary ovens set on working height and/or integrated into the kitchen cabinets - usually include a visible grill resistor in Finland. The lower resistor is normally built in (set under the ceramic coating) but the upper one is bare; unprotected and visible. The upper resistor can be turned on on itself to produce radiating heat straight downwards: mimicing grilling/roasting/barbecue/broiling over barbecue coils or gas burners; just upside down. The grill resistor can be set to any oven temperature (50 - 275°C) - not just low, medium or high.

View attachment 56160
Ahhh...what you call a resistor, we would call a heating element.

Normal broiler/grill/resistor setting here is high (at least on every medium-priced oven I've ever owned) - you just press the broil button on the control panel and the top heating element gets as hot as it can - on my current oven, that's 525F.

If you want lighter browning, you just set the oven rack further away from the top. A lot of recipes here will actually specify a broiling distance, as in, "Place 3 inches below the heating element and broil until brown and bubbling, approximate 4 minutes," something like that.
 

mjd

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Ahhh...what you call a resistor, we would call a heating element.

Normal broiler/grill/resistor setting here is high (at least on every medium-priced oven I've ever owned) - you just press the broil button on the control panel and the top heating element gets as hot as it can - on my current oven, that's 525F.

If you want lighter browning, you just set the oven rack further away from the top. A lot of recipes here will actually specify a broiling distance, as in, "Place 3 inches below the heating element and broil until brown and bubbling, approximate 4 minutes," something like that.
On every oven I've owned/used, there is an option for "low" and "high" broil. I've never seen one that sets a temperature either.
 

TastyReuben

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On every oven I've owned/used, there is an option for "low" and "high" broil. I've never seen one that sets a temperature either.
So I went back to my oven owner's manual and, sure enough, I can set the temp of the broiler if I choose to. It defaults to the highest temp, but it can be adjusted downward.

Thanks for making me look! :)
 

Hemulen

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Ahhh...what you call a resistor, we would call a heating element.

Normal broiler/grill/resistor setting here is high (at least on every medium-priced oven I've ever owned) - you just press the broil button on the control panel and the top heating element gets as hot as it can - on my current oven, that's 525F.

If you want lighter browning, you just set the oven rack further away from the top. A lot of recipes here will actually specify a broiling distance, as in, "Place 3 inches below the heating element and broil until brown and bubbling, approximate 4 minutes," something like that.
Ok, I'll call it a grill resistor/heating element in the future :okay:.
 
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