Metric system measurements to American measurements

JAS_OH1

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So we have this wonderful international community here, and I was curious if it bothers forum members from other countries when Americans post recipes using teaspoons, cups, etc.? I have measuring cups that also have the metric measurements on the other side, is that pretty much standard in other countries as well? When I post a recipe, should I be transposing it into metric measurements as well to make it easier for people from other countries or are you all just used to it by now?

Making an entry for the recipe contest tomorrow and just wondering how other people feel about this.
 

Hemulen

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So we have this wonderful international community here, and I was curious if it bothers forum members from other countries when Americans post recipes using teaspoons, cups, etc.? I have measuring cups that also have the metric measurements on the other side, is that pretty much standard in other countries as well? When I post a recipe, should I be transposing it into metric measurements as well to make it easier for people from other countries or are you all just used to it by now?

Making an entry for the recipe contest tomorrow and just wondering how other people feel about this.
Like mjd stated, it's thoughtful to even ask this. Of course it would be kind to make the conversions straight into the recipe. I haven't been that kind :whistling: . In my opinion, there are many easy online converters available so I don't think it's a big deal if you just post your recipe in the measurements you're accustomed to. I quit using dl measurements and replaced them with ml measurements (100 X) as they are used more widely. I also try to put all measurements into measures of volume/cubic measures so that there's need for only one converter per recipe. Weight to volume (and cups to ml) converters can be found easily for pretty much all ingredients. Teaspoons and tablespoons are (almost) the same everywhere.
 

JAS_OH1

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Thanks! With the teaspoons and tablespoons, I have seen grams listed from non-Americans (I think I recall it being in reference to measuring yeast). I guess I find that confusing because to me a gram is a weight, so different things would be a different weight depending on the density of the item. Or is it like ounces are here in the US, as we have both fluid ounces and ounces for weight? I find it all a bit confusing.

The recipe I am entering is a very forgiving one, so a variation in amounts isn't really going to "amount" to much in regards to flavor, LOL!
 

CookieMonster

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lots and lots of slept-through-science-class-Americans are unaware there are ounces of weight and ounces of volume.

but that's not the issue - the real is is as mentioned: density.
translating from cups (US) to grams (Eur) is problematic.
adding to the problem: stuff like flour - difference brands are different ginds, wheat types, etc etc etc and x grams of one flour does not work of like x grams of any other flour.

salt is the same density issue. the weight of a teaspoon of sea/kosher/table/popcorn salt is not the same.
different brands of kosher salt - grains or flakes - are not the same.....
 

Hemulen

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Thanks! With the teaspoons and tablespoons, I have seen grams listed from non-Americans (I think I recall it being in reference to measuring yeast). I guess I find that confusing because to me a gram is a weight, so different things would be a different weight depending on the density of the item. Or is it like ounces are here in the US, as we have both fluid ounces and ounces for weight? I find it all a bit confusing.

The recipe I am entering is a very forgiving one, so a variation in amounts isn't really going to "amount" to much in regards to flavor, LOL!
Weight (or more precisely mass) depends of the density of the substance. That's why all conversions from grams to ml or lbs to cups should be converted according to specific ingredients (like CookieMonster stated above). A cup of oats (flakes) has a smaller mass than a cup of oat flour, as the density of flour is bigger (more particles per cubic measure). A cup of water weighs less than a cup of raw eggs and more than a cup of flour. There is really no need to think about weight/volume difference if there is "a teaspoon of this or that" in the recipe. You just take the teaspoon and measure with that. There might be sporadic mass/gram markings in my recipes too because I've been sloppy at times. Grams just need to be treated as mass instead of volume and converted with a mass (weight) converter.

Some measures:

aa_3.JPG


1. Link to an ingredient-specific volume to weight converter.
2. Another good converter.

Some common ingredients:

com.JPG
 
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JAS_OH1

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I guess I'll be okay, since the recipe has never been written down and is in my head. I'll just use liquid measurements instead of weight when I write it up.
 

JAS_OH1

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Weight (or more precisely mass) depends of the density of the substance. That's why all conversions from grams to ml or lbs to cups should be converted according to specific ingredients (like CookieMonster stated above). A cup of oats (flakes) has a smaller mass than a cup of oat flour, as the density of flour is bigger (more particles per cubic measure). A cup of water weighs less than a cup of raw eggs and more than a cup of flour. There is really no need to think about weight/volume difference if there is "a teaspoon of this or that" in the recipe. You just take the teaspoon and measure with that. There might be sporadic mass/gram markings in my recipes too because I've been sloppy at times. Grams just need to be treated as mass instead of volume and converted with a mass (weight) converter.

Some measures:

View attachment 50744

1. Link to an ingredient-specific volume to weight converter.
2. Another good converter.

Some common ingredients:

View attachment 50745
And this is very helpful, thank you!
 

Burt Blank

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lots and lots of slept-through-science-class-Americans are unaware there are ounces of weight and ounces of volume.

but that's not the issue - the real is is as mentioned: density.
translating from cups (US) to grams (Eur) is problematic.
adding to the problem: stuff like flour - difference brands are different ginds, wheat types, etc etc etc and x grams of one flour does not work of like x grams of any other flour.

salt is the same density issue. the weight of a teaspoon of sea/kosher/table/popcorn salt is not the same.
different brands of kosher salt - grains or flakes - are not the same.....
Which is heavier a pound of gold or a pound of feathers ? The troy ounce is a metric used in weighing precious metals. The troy ounce is the equivalent of 31.1034768 grams, whereas the ounce is the equivalent of 28.349 grams. A troy pound (12 troy ounces) is lighter than a standard pound (14.6 troy ounces).
Density is in the brain of the beholder.
 

Burt Blank

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So we have this wonderful international community here, and I was curious if it bothers forum members from other countries when Americans post recipes using teaspoons, cups, etc.? I have measuring cups that also have the metric measurements on the other side, is that pretty much standard in other countries as well? When I post a recipe, should I be transposing it into metric measurements as well to make it easier for people from other countries or are you all just used to it by now?

Making an entry for the recipe contest tomorrow and just wondering how other people feel about this.
Jassers the only feelings you need to think about are mine, because I am the Judge !!!! Approach the bench, my ruling is as follows. It is the taking part, not the winning that impresses me. For all I care, anything more than a picture of your final plate is superfluous. I do understand the relevance of recipe specificity. Your concern for others is admirable.
 

epicuric

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A very considerate post JAS_OH1! I really wouldn't worry too much about it - it's an international forum so we have to accept different methods of measurment. The only things that throw me is when measurements are impractical or illogical - a tablespoon of butter for instance, or when solids are quoted in fluid quantities.
 

Hemulen

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A very considerate post JAS_OH1! I really wouldn't worry too much about it - it's an international forum so we have to accept different methods of measurment. The only things that throw me is when measurements are impractical or illogical - a tablespoon of butter for instance, or when solids are quoted in fluid quantities.
Hmm. In my opinion solids can very well be quoted in fluid quantities aka volume-wise (by cubic capasity). I think many of us don't own a kitchen scale to convert e.g. 0,5 oz butter into grams or 50 g of butter into ounces (or to pounds). It's much simpler to measure ingredients (approximately) by volume (aka fluid quantities) than to have to search the density (grams per cubic cm) of each ingredient before converting the amount into a familiar weight unit (e.g. by a convertion chart like this). All ingredients are "equal" volume-wise = not dependent of their mass/density/weight.

This chart (approximates) is all that is needed for all ingredients world-wide, if you stick to fluid quantities:

1000 ml = 1 cubic dm = 1 liter (of anything) = 1000 g of water = a different weight of any other substance, e.g. only 580 g of plain flour

1 teaspoon (of anything) = 5 ml (of anything) = 0,17 fluid oz (of anything) = 0,021 US cups (of anything) = 5 grams/0,17 oz of water (or 4,8 grams of butter or 2,6 grams of plain flour)
1 tablespoon (of anything) = 15 ml (of anything) = 0,5 fl-oz (of anything) = 0,063 US cups (of anything) = 15 grams/0,5 oz of water (or 14,38 grams of butter or 7,8 grams of plain flour)
1 US cup (of anything) = 240 ml (of anything) = 8 fl-oz (of anything) = 240 grams/8 oz of water
1 US pint (of anything) = 480 ml (of anything) = 16 fl-oz (of anything) = 480 grams/16 oz of water
1 UK cup (of anything) = 280 ml (of anything) = 9,47 fl-oz (of anything) = 280 grams/9,47 oz of water
1 UK pint (of anything) = 570 ml (of anything) = 19,3 fl-oz (of anything) = 570 grams/19,3 oz of water
1 US gallon (of anything) = 3750 ml (of anything) = 127 fl-oz (of anything) = 3750 grams/127 oz of water
(1 lb/pound of water = 473 ml of water = 473 grams/16 oz of water); pound isn't a cubic volume


"APF/plain (wheat) flour weighs 0.593 gram per cubic centimeter or 593 kilogram per cubic meter, i.e. density of flour, wheat is equal to 593 kg/m³. In Imperial or US customary measurement system, the density is equal to 37 pound per cubic foot [lb/ft³], or 0.343 ounce per cubic inch [oz/inch³]" (Source)

It's an endless task to check the weight of each ingredient per cubic meter. However, grams, ounces or pounds are often used in recipes. In such cases, weights have to be converted with oz <-> lb <-> gram -converters - followed with different ingredient-specific converters, if cubic measures (like teaspoons, fluid ounces or milliliters) are wanted. Often the context, pics or cooking instructions give an idea of the proportion/balance of quantities, so I don't think it's that important to think about conversions in "ordinary" recipes (excluding soufflés or other delicate dishes with precise quantities). Just have fun and cook! Experimenting is learning :okay:.
 
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JAS_OH1

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A very considerate post JAS_OH1! I really wouldn't worry too much about it - it's an international forum so we have to accept different methods of measurment. The only things that throw me is when measurements are impractical or illogical - a tablespoon of butter for instance, or when solids are quoted in fluid quantities.
My recipe is going to be impractical, then, as I will be using a few tablespoons of butter and plan on filling a measuring cup with various seafood and other ingredient amounts to keep the ratios in balance.
 

Morning Glory

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have measuring cups that also have the metric measurements on the other side, is that pretty much standard in other countries as well?
Cups aren't standard in the UK and most folk in the UK won't have a cup measure (I do). But seriously, there is no need to convert recipes to metric. It would drive members away! Its easy enough to find conversion tools on-line.
 
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