Microwave Cake-making

Discussion in 'Baking, Bread Making and Cakes' started by impish, Dec 20, 2018.

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  1. impish

    impish Regular Member

    I may not yet qualify to post an image, though I am anxious to do so. At any rate, one of my favorite cakes from childhood was a Marble Cake my Mother made for me often. Around age 10, I succeeded in getting her to allow me to make one myself.

    Nowadays, in possession of her old recipe box, obtained when she passed away in 1986, I ocassionally yield to trying one of those old favorites. If my images are disallowed, well, ...........this thread will become basically bogus. Here goes:
    00110.jpg

    00210.jpg

    Kindly forgive the fuzzy images.......I see them here in my preview, suggesting you will too. Important point is that these loaf cakes were baked in a MICROWAVE OVEN........yummy!
    impish
     
    MypinchofItaly likes this.
  2. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    Its fine to post images. :okay:

    The cake looks good - it looks like its cooked in a metal tin though (can't be!). I've cooked sponge puddings before in the microwave which are OK - but whenever I tries cakes they end up a bit 'rubbery'. I must have another go. Any tips?
     
    impish likes this.
  3. Shermie

    Shermie Über Member

    Location:
    Brighton, MA.
    I don't bake cakes in the microwave for fear that it might end up being rubbery & tough!!!! :headshake:
     
  4. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    I know - but I'm going to try again. I know that 'steamed' type puddings work well in the microwave. So I'm sure a cake could be good too. Any tips @impish?
     
  5. oddduck

    oddduck Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Usa
    How did you bakes in the microwave in metal tins without setting the whole thing alight? A wire twist tie throws sparks, a whole loaf pan has gotta throw a spanner in the works....

    That said i have no idea what a spanner is but only know the phrase.
     
    impish likes this.
  6. impish

    impish Regular Member

    My wife really is the expert, due to her greater experience. I merely apply sound engineering logic where here recommendations seem to not quite fit, she dislikes that, but knows of my terribly inquisitive nature.

    So, well, tips I can offer almost none, other than to consult good books on the topic. One thought comes to mind: I believe the cakes she made when teaching microwave cooking were usually "box cakes", pre-mixed such as are very numerous in the stores. Many have microwaving directions on the box in addition to conventional baking directions. I will ask her about tips.
     
  7. impish

    impish Regular Member

    @oddduck
    In general, nothing metal should ever be put in a microwave. However, as is the case with many technical things, there are exceptions. One is dependent on the amount of "load" imposed on the oven. For example, if a large turkey is being microwave-baked, his wing-tips and often even the drumstick's ends are wrapped with aluminum foil, to prevent over-cooking of those protruding parts. No sparking will occur under such conditions.

    Once, not knowing that a fast-food beef sandwich product, wrapped in what I thought was paper, had metal foil integral with the wrapping paper. Imagine my surprise when a few seconds after I pushed "start", the oven was filled with smoke and flame: the foil had sparked enough to ignite the paper!
     
  8. impish

    impish Regular Member

    [Mod.Edit: Post edited and new thread started (see below)]

    @morning glory "Any tips?"
    Not quite what you asked for, and off-thread, but perhaps pertinent to the discussion: how about a 17+ pound Tom Turkey baked to perfection in 130 minutes?

    See new thread here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 21, 2018
  9. oddduck

    oddduck Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Usa
    "For example, if a large turkey is being microwave-baked,"

    Perhaps your microwave is a bit different than mine, the metal leaf on my vintage pyrex will make sparks no matter the mass/load in the pot.
     
  10. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

    So - to satisfy my and @oddduck's curiosity, the cakes shown above are cooked in metal tins in the microwave and it is the weight of the overall load which ensures they don't spark?
     
    impish likes this.
  11. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

  12. morning glory

    morning glory Obsessive cook Staff Member

  13. impish

    impish Regular Member

    @morning glory
    That is correct. However, it is always best to employ microwavable plastic, as accidents can happen. as you may have noted, our oven has a huge metal turntable in it. Even with a very small "load", say, a cup of coffee, no sparking ever takes place.
     
  14. oddduck

    oddduck Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Usa
    The turntable looks enameled, could that play a part?
     
    impish likes this.
  15. Shermie

    Shermie Über Member

    Location:
    Brighton, MA.
    How were you able to use metal pans in the microwave? :unsure:
     

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