need a good recipe for Yorkshire Pudding

kgord

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I am going to make Prime Rib or some kind of beef roast for Christmas. I was thinking of making a Yorkshire pudding with them...I have never made one..so I need a good never fail recipe. Also, what is the difference between Yorkshire Pudding and Pop overs?
 

Morning Glory

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There is one recipe that never ever fails. Its by James Martin. I use it every time for huge puffy Yorkshires! Its essential to use plain flour for Yorkshire Puds. For years I used S.R. flour and wondered why my Yorkshire's didn't rise properly! Its also essential to heat the oil fiercely in the muffin/bun tin before adding the batter. I sometimes use dariole moulds placed on a baking sheet instead of a bun tin.

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1581636/james-martins-yorkshire-puds

Pop-overs are essentially the same as Yorkshires and probably evolved from them. Most pop-over recipes don't include pouring oil into the muffin tin and heating but greasing the tin instead. IMHO you get a higher rise if you use the heated oil method.
 
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The recipe I use is equal quantities (by volume) of eggs, plain flour and liquid (half milk, half water) - 1 egg is usually approx 1/4 an american measuring cup.
I use a muffin tin and use 1 egg per 3 yorkies - I find the best results are when each cup in the muffin tin is at around 2/3 full.
Other tips are: don't overbeat the batter, a few lumps don't matter. And as morning glory says, make sure the tin and the oil are very hot.
 

Morning Glory

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The recipe I use is equal quantities (by volume) of eggs, plain flour and liquid (half milk, half water) - 1 egg is usually approx 1/4 an american measuring cup.
I use a muffin tin and use 1 egg per 3 yorkies - I find the best results are when each cup in the muffin tin is at around 2/3 full.
Other tips are: don't overbeat the batter, a few lumps don't matter. And as morning glory says, make sure the tin and the oil are very hot.
I agree about not over beating! Lumps won't matter at all.
 

classic33

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Yorkshire Pudding
Eh waiter, excuse me a minute
I'm not findin' fault, but dear me
'taties is lovely and beef is alreit
But what sort of pudding can this be?

It's what? Yorkshire Puddin'? Now cum cum cum cum
It's Yorkshire Puddin' yer say?
I'll grant yer it's some sort o' puddin', owd lad
But not THE Yorkshire Puddin', nay, nay.

Now reit Yorkshire Puddin's a poem in batter,
T'mek it's an art, not a trade
So just listen t' me and I'll tell t' thee
How t' first Yorkshire puddin' were made

A young angel wi day off from 'eaven,
Were flyin' abaht Ilkla Moor,
When t' angel, poor thing, got cramp in a wing
An' cum down at an owd women's door

. T' owd woman said "Eee - it's an angel.
By 'eck, I'm fair capped to see thee.
I've noan seen yan afore - but tha's welcome,
Come on in, an' I'll mash thi some tea."

T' angel said, "By gum, thank you kindly."
Though she only supped one mug o' tea,
She et two drippin' slices and one Sally Lunn.
Angel's eat very lightly yer see.

Then t'owd woman looked at clock sayin'
"Ey up, t'owd feller's back soon from t'mill.
You gerron wi' yer tea, but please excuse me,
As I'll atter mek puddin' fer Bill."

Then t' angel jumped up and said gie us it 'ere,
Flour, water, eggs, salt an' all,
An' I'll show thee 'ow we meks puddins,
Up in 'eaven for Saints Peter and Paul.

So t' angel took bowl and stuck a wing in,
Stirring it round, whispering "Hush"
An' she tenderly ticked at t'mixture,
Like an artist ed paint wi a brush.

Then t'owd woman asked " 'ere wor is it then,
T'secret o' puddins made up above?"
"It's nowt i' flour or watta, said t'angel,
"Just mek sure that tha meks it wi' luv."

When it were done , she popped it i' t'oven,
"Gie it nobbut ten minutes", she said.
Then off t'angel flew, leavin' first Yorkshire Puddin',
That ivver were properly med.

An' that why it melts in yer gob just like snow.
An' as light as a maiden's first kiss,
An' as soft as the fluff on t'breast of a puff,
Not ELEPHANT'S LEATHER like this.


Anon
 

classic33

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Or if no Angel willing to help out

Ingredients
4 large, fresh eggs, measured into a jug
Equal quantity of milk to your measured eggs
Equal quantity of all purpose/plain flour to measured eggs
Pinch of salt
2 tbsp lard, beef dripping (or vegetable oil!)

Method
  • Heat the oven to the highest temperature possible, however, do not exceed 230°C / 450°F or the fat may burn.
  • Pour the eggs and milk into a large mixing bowl and add the pinch of salt. Whisk thoroughly with an electric hand beater or hand whisk. Leave to stand for 10 minutes.
  • Gradually sieve the same volume of flour (as the eggs) into the milk and egg mixture, again using an electric hand beater or hand-whisk to create a lump free batter resembling thick cream, if there are any lumps pass the batter through a fine sieve.
  • Leave the batter to rest in the kitchen for a minimum of 30 minutes, longer if possible - up to several hours.
  • Place a pea-sized piece of lard, dripping or ½ tsp vegetable oil into your chosen Yorkshire pudding tin, or a 4 x 2"/5cm hole tin or 12-hole muffin tin and heat in the oven until the fat is smoking. Give the batter another good whisk adding 2 tbsps of cold water and fill a third of each section of the tin with batter and return quickly to the oven.
  • Leave to cook until golden brown approx 20 minutes. Repeat the last step again until all the batter is used up.
  • In Yorkshire serving the pudding is traditionally with gravy as a starter dish followed by the meat and vegetables. More often smaller puddings cooked in muffin tins are served alongside meat and vegetables.
  • Yorkshire Puddings do not reheat well, becoming brittle and dry.

The secret to making Yorkshires, as they are fondly known, is to pour well rested, cold batter into slightly smoking hot fat and put immediately back into a really hot oven. It is as simple as that.

http://britishfood.about.com/od/regionalenglishrecipes/r/yorkspuds.htm
 

Morning Glory

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Yorkshire Pudding
Eh waiter, excuse me a minute
I'm not findin' fault, but dear me
'taties is lovely and beef is alreit
But what sort of pudding can this be?

It's what? Yorkshire Puddin'? Now cum cum cum cum
It's Yorkshire Puddin' yer say?
I'll grant yer it's some sort o' puddin', owd lad
But not THE Yorkshire Puddin', nay, nay.

Now reit Yorkshire Puddin's a poem in batter,
T'mek it's an art, not a trade
So just listen t' me and I'll tell t' thee
How t' first Yorkshire puddin' were made

A young angel wi day off from 'eaven,
Were flyin' abaht Ilkla Moor,
When t' angel, poor thing, got cramp in a wing
An' cum down at an owd women's door

. T' owd woman said "Eee - it's an angel.
By 'eck, I'm fair capped to see thee.
I've noan seen yan afore - but tha's welcome,
Come on in, an' I'll mash thi some tea."

T' angel said, "By gum, thank you kindly."
Though she only supped one mug o' tea,
She et two drippin' slices and one Sally Lunn.
Angel's eat very lightly yer see.

Then t'owd woman looked at clock sayin'
"Ey up, t'owd feller's back soon from t'mill.
You gerron wi' yer tea, but please excuse me,
As I'll atter mek puddin' fer Bill."

Then t' angel jumped up and said gie us it 'ere,
Flour, water, eggs, salt an' all,
An' I'll show thee 'ow we meks puddins,
Up in 'eaven for Saints Peter and Paul.

So t' angel took bowl and stuck a wing in,
Stirring it round, whispering "Hush"
An' she tenderly ticked at t'mixture,
Like an artist ed paint wi a brush.

Then t'owd woman asked " 'ere wor is it then,
T'secret o' puddins made up above?"
"It's nowt i' flour or watta, said t'angel,
"Just mek sure that tha meks it wi' luv."

When it were done , she popped it i' t'oven,
"Gie it nobbut ten minutes", she said.
Then off t'angel flew, leavin' first Yorkshire Puddin',
That ivver were properly med.

An' that why it melts in yer gob just like snow.
An' as light as a maiden's first kiss,
An' as soft as the fluff on t'breast of a puff,
Not ELEPHANT'S LEATHER like this.


Anon
Its a great ditty. But 10 minutes cooking time? :unsure:
 

Morning Glory

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Or if no Angel willing to help out

Ingredients
4 large, fresh eggs, measured into a jug
Equal quantity of milk to your measured eggs
Equal quantity of all purpose/plain flour to measured eggs
Pinch of salt
2 tbsp lard, beef dripping (or vegetable oil!)

Method
  • Heat the oven to the highest temperature possible, however, do not exceed 230°C / 450°F or the fat may burn.
  • Pour the eggs and milk into a large mixing bowl and add the pinch of salt. Whisk thoroughly with an electric hand beater or hand whisk. Leave to stand for 10 minutes.
  • Gradually sieve the same volume of flour (as the eggs) into the milk and egg mixture, again using an electric hand beater or hand-whisk to create a lump free batter resembling thick cream, if there are any lumps pass the batter through a fine sieve.
  • Leave the batter to rest in the kitchen for a minimum of 30 minutes, longer if possible - up to several hours.
  • Place a pea-sized piece of lard, dripping or ½ tsp vegetable oil into your chosen Yorkshire pudding tin, or a 4 x 2"/5cm hole tin or 12-hole muffin tin and heat in the oven until the fat is smoking. Give the batter another good whisk adding 2 tbsps of cold water and fill a third of each section of the tin with batter and return quickly to the oven.
  • Leave to cook until golden brown approx 20 minutes. Repeat the last step again until all the batter is used up.
  • In Yorkshire serving the pudding is traditionally with gravy as a starter dish followed by the meat and vegetables. More often smaller puddings cooked in muffin tins are served alongside meat and vegetables.
  • Yorkshire Puddings do not reheat well, becoming brittle and dry.

The secret to making Yorkshires, as they are fondly known, is to pour well rested, cold batter into slightly smoking hot fat and put immediately back into a really hot oven. It is as simple as that.

http://britishfood.about.com/od/regionalenglishrecipes/r/yorkspuds.htm
Very similar to James Martin's. But the stuff about sieving the batter is nonsense. Who would be bothered? And I can attest to the fact that lumpy batter works.
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Our family recipe is marginally different, I think.
If you read this thread, you will see that there is a whole load of ways it can go wrong, so run a tester session a day or two prior to the big day, else you may be very disappointed.
That's a really good suggestion....they aren't as easy as they sound: sometimes you think you've done everything right and they still don't work.
It took me years to find a recipe that consistently worked for me - there are loads of recipes out there and each one swears that THIS one works but you try it and still end up with a soggy lump :-(
 
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