Origin of the cloud egg and its distribution as a technique today.

flyinglentris

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The cloud egg concept originated in France, first noted in 1651. It was then called 'eggs in the snow' or oeufs a la Niege. Eggs in the snow is not the same thing today, being a meringue floating in custard sauce. This latter definition is what will be found, if you google for oeufs a la Niege.

Cloud eggs as a concept, was revived in culinary circles world wide, only recently in the period from about 2010 to today.
 

Morning Glory

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Another name for them is "Floating Islands"

Me too - Floating Islands is a French dessert "îles flottante" - the yolks are used in the custard and whites into a meringue which 'floats' in the custard. Another name for Oeufs à la Neige.

1630583378143.png


Very different from 'cloud eggs'.

I did find one source which cites that the original Oeufs à la neige originally appeared in 1651 and were essentially 'cloud eggs' as flyinglentris states. I am wondering if they really did resemble cloud eggs. Here is the citation. I'd like to see a copy of the original recipe in the book, as it doesn't sound like cloud eggs to me.

While cloud eggs may seem like a new food fad, they actually got their start in 17th century France, Daniel Gritzer, the culinary director at Serious Eats, told NPR. The recipe for oeufs a la Neige, translated to “eggs in the snow,” was published in Le Cuisinier Francois in 1651.

These eggs of yore were baked in on top of coals and warmed from above using a tool called a salamander. Today, the name “snow eggs” refers to a dessert made with meringue and custard as opposed to the funky breakfast dish of the past.

What Are Cloud Eggs, And Why Are They Taking Social Media By Storm? - Escoffier Online

There are other citations but they are all based on the above quote.
 
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caseydog

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Now I find myself wanting to make the modern version of cloud eggs, just to see if there is any reason to make them, other than to impress the easily impressed. They are easy to make. They just don't look like something I want to actually make to eat. More later...

CD
 

Morning Glory

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Now I find myself wanting to make the modern version of cloud eggs, just to see if there is any reason to make them, other than to impress the easily impressed. They are easy to make. They just don't look like something I want to actually make to eat.

CD

I'm not keen on them. I made some for another similar thread from 2017 :Cloud Eggs

I flavoured the whites with parmesan: See here.

70515
 

garlichead

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Me too - Floating Islands is a French dessert "îles flottante" - the yolks are used in the custard and whites into a meringue which 'floats' in the custard. Another name for Oeufs à la Neige.

View attachment 70514

Very different from 'cloud eggs'.

I did find one source which cites that the original Oeufs à la neige originally appeared in 1651 and were essentially 'cloud eggs' as flyinglentris states. I am wondering if they really did resemble cloud eggs. Here is the citation. I'd like to see a copy of the original recipe in the book, as it doesn't sound like cloud eggs to me.



What Are Cloud Eggs, And Why Are They Taking Social Media By Storm? - Escoffier Online

There are other citations but they are all based on the above quote.
Thanks MG and yes I know they're different from the "cloud egg" recipe. Mentioned floating islands for people that may not make the connection because I believe floating island is more common, at least in North America.
 

garlichead

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I'm not keen on them. I made some for another similar thread from 2017 :Cloud Eggs

I flavoured the whites with parmesan: See here.

View attachment 70515
I think the key to a successful dish, and I'm just winging it here based on experience with eggs in general but the timing, temperature and heat transfer with texture an equally important factor. The opportunity for this recipe going south and tasting dry, airy and crumbly, (yes a technical culinary term, lol) is very high. Or undercooked tasting wet, soft and airy, not very appealing either way. Personally I don't see this being all that appetizing to begin with but it could be decent if the right texture is achieved. That being, the egg whites are not over whipped, which creates a dry egg white and layed out to a thickness that allows for a quick set and allowing the interior to come up to an interior temp of around 140 and under a salamander or broiler to bring a nice crisp crunch to the outer layer. Even then I can't really find this appealing in a culinary sense, but you never know. I might try if I have some free time in the kitchen. What did you find unappealing in your attempt?

EDIT: I believe that the interior of the egg clouds have to be fairly dense while the outside has some texture or slight crunch. I say dense because a dry mouthful of light airy egg whites in contrast to the exterior is what I'm having a problem with, which is more likely to happen most of the time. If I get around to seeing what happens when I make these I will also add in some yolk to add structure which translates to texture. How much yolk will probably come down to a math equation, but it would be interesting to find out. The sugar in Floating Islands adds the structure and texture and eating them is pleasantly luscious, and I think the yolks might have a similar effect.
 
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caseydog

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I really can't make a judgment since I haven't made or eaten a cloud egg. That's why I need to make one. I've seen them made on videos, and have always been hit with the thought, "Why?"

I'll try to keep an open mind. If it turns out to be good food, fine. Otherwise, I'll just write it off as a waste of an egg -- not a huge loss.

CD
 

flyinglentris

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I think the key to a successful dish, and I'm just winging it here based on experience with eggs in general but the timing, temperature and heat transfer with texture an equally important factor. The opportunity for this recipe going south and tasting dry, airy and crumbly, (yes a technical culinary term, lol) is very high. Or undercooked tasting wet, soft and airy, not very appealing either way. Personally I don't see this being all that appetizing to begin with but it could be decent if the right texture is achieved. That being, the egg whites are not over whipped, which creates a dry egg white and layed out to a thickness that allows for a quick set and allowing the interior to come up to an interior temp of around 140 and under a salamander or broiler to bring a nice crisp crunch to the outer layer. Even then I can't really find this appealing in a culinary sense, but you never know. I might try if I have some free time in the kitchen. What did you find unappealing in your attempt?

EDIT: I believe that the interior of the egg clouds have to be fairly dense while the outside has some texture or slight crunch. I say dense because a dry mouthful of light airy egg whites in contrast to the exterior is what I'm having a problem with, which is more likely to happen most of the time. If I get around to seeing what happens when I make these I will also add in some yolk to add structure which translates to texture. How much yolk will probably come down to a math equation, but it would be interesting to find out. The sugar in Floating Islands adds the structure and texture and eating them is pleasantly luscious, and I think the yolks might have a similar effect.

The cloud eggs I did on two different recipes tasted good and had good texture. They gave a good twist to the dishes they were applied to.

I think the real issue with cloud eggs is not to make them strictly for themselves, but instead, to top off a more basic entree.
 

Morning Glory

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What did you find unappealing in your attempt?

This:
I say dense because a dry mouthful of light airy egg whites in contrast to the exterior is what I'm having a problem with, which is more likely to happen most of the time.

Well a bit as you describe, I think. Basically, I didn't like the 'mouth feel' of the egg white. Its four years since I made them so I find it hard to remember precisely but I think its a case of style over substance. Although, having said that I'm not sure they really do look very pretty (or stylish!).
 

garlichead

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Yeah, I quickly made a cloud egg at work with some green onion and parmesan for texture and I'm sorry to say I'd rather just make an egg white omelet. The yolk going back into the oven is more of an after though and doesn't blend well, yeah, not for me, but I'm sure many will like it. A little trendy I think.
 
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