Recipe Quinoa Stuffed Quinoa Ravioli

The Late Night Gourmet

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I used a tricolor quinoa to grind up into flour, so the result is darker than it might be with a light colored quinoa. I didn’t trust the flour to hold together into a pasta by itself, so I blended it with my favorite pasta flour, “00” flour. Quinoa flour can be used in the same proportions as regular flour in recipes, but it does need the gluten of regular flour to hold it together in some cases, such as this.

NOTE: I always add salt to my pasta dough so that it’s properly season throughout, rather than relying on salt in the water to do the job. As a result, I do not recommend adding salt to the water when cooking the pasta.

Ingredients

For the dough


1/2 cup “00” flour
about 2/3 cup quinoa (grind enough dry quinoa to make 1/2 cup of powder)
2 eggs
1-1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1-1/2 teaspoon olive oil

For the filling

1/2 cup quinoa
4 ounces prosciutto, cut in small cubes
several spinach leaves


Directions

1. Combine dough ingredients in a bowl. Blend together with a blender equipped with dough hooks, scraping down the sides as you go.

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2. When the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl, turn out the dough onto a well-floured surface. Kneed the dough until all the flour is combined. Roll the dough into a ball. Wrap the dough with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least half an hour to allow the dough to settle.

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NOTE: the dough turned out to be too sticky to roll through a pasta roller. I rolled it as thinly as I could, but it was a bit thicker than I would have preferred.

3. Cook prosciutto in a pan until browned. Allow to cool. Wilt spinach in the pan until softened. Allow to cool, then cut into small pieces.

4. Bring a cup of water to a boil. Add 1/2 quinoa. Lower to a simmer, and cook for 15 minutes, or until water is fully combined. Allow to cool to room temperature.

5. Remove dough from refrigerator. Allow to sit at room temperature for at least half an hour. Roll the dough out in sections. Roll out as flat as possible. Cut into rectangles. Add a teaspoon of quinoa in tight piles, and sprinkle on some prosciutto and spinach.

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6. Lay the other dough rectangle over the top of the one with the filling. Press down around the filling, and pinch down around the edges. Cut into ravioli using a formed cutter, or a knife.

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7. Repeat the above for remaining dough and filling (you will end up with extra filling). Allow ravioli to rest for a few minutes to allow it to dry a bit.

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8. Cook in a large pot of boiling water for 5 minutes, ensuring that the pot isn't crowded. Scoop out with a slotted spoon and move to drying rack. Repeat for remaining ravioli.
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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Excellent!
I love all grains, wholegrain creations, alternative flour dishes...this looks very appetizing!
Great idea and execution!
Do you see these ravioli working with cheese filling?

Yes...that’s a great idea. I now wish I had made a cheesy quinoa filling to go with the prosciutto and spinach.
 

medtran49

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NOTE: the dough turned out to be too sticky to roll through a pasta roller. I rolled it as thinly as I could, but it was a bit thicker than I would have preferred.

Did you try the trick where you press it out into a rough rectangle, heavily flour, run it thru, flour, fold into thirds , flour outsides, run thru again, maybe do that 1-3 more times? Doing that always works when my dough is a bit sticky, besides the fact that it shapes it pretty nicely for an even roll out.
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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NOTE: the dough turned out to be too sticky to roll through a pasta roller. I rolled it as thinly as I could, but it was a bit thicker than I would have preferred.

Did you try the trick where you press it out into a rough rectangle, heavily flour, run it thru, flour, fold into thirds , flour outsides, run thru again, maybe do that 1-3 more times? Doing that always works when my dough is a bit sticky, besides the fact that it shapes it pretty nicely for an even roll out.

I should have done that, but I got impatient when it kept sticking to the rolling pin. I added flour to the dough, and I was able to roll it. At that point, I could have set up the pasta roller again, and I’m sure it would have worked. Thanks for the tip. Now, this makes me want to try making this again.
 

caseydog

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I should have done that, but I got impatient when it kept sticking to the rolling pin. I added flour to the dough, and I was able to roll it. At that point, I could have set up the pasta roller again, and I’m sure it would have worked. Thanks for the tip. Now, this makes me want to try making this again.

I have found cooked quinoa to be very sticky.

But, I've also found it to be very compatible with cheese.

CD
 

JAS_OH1

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Wow, what a tremendously creative idea! It looks yummy, thank you for posting this!
 
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