Recipe Sausage Dip

Cinisajoy

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This is a very common dip in Texas. I will post the original then the variations.

Sausage Dip.
1 pound ground beef
1 pound pork sausage
2 lbs Velveeta cheese (processed cheese spread)*
1 minced onion
1 can "Old El Paso" Jalapeño and tomato mix
1 can mushroom soup
1 teaspoon garlic powder.
Cook ground beef and sausage until done. Add Velveeta and stir until melted. Add remaining ingredients. Serve with tortilla chips. It helps to keep it warm in a chafing dish.

Work around for those that cannot get or cannot afford Velveeta (or its generic counterparts)
For the Velveeta: substitute your favorite yellow cheese sauce. About 1 liter.
Variations:
You can leave out the sausage.
You can leave out the ground beef.
You can use Rotel instead of Old El Paso.
Most people leave out the mushroom soup.

You can also use fresh vegetables but cook them down before adding to the cheese mixture.

*Now if you are serving this and homemade bread at a potluck, do not expect either to last 15 minutes.
 
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Cinisajoy

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Would have to leave out the Velveeta in the UK - It's £58.20 ($76.81) per pound on Amazon, who seem to be the only suppliers :D
Holy for God's sakes. Good gravy Marie. OMG.
It is $7.99 or less for 2 lbs here. Let me post a work around.
Added a work around to the original recipe.
 
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The Late Night Gourmet

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Would have to leave out the Velveeta in the UK - It's £58.20 ($76.81) per pound on Amazon, who seem to be the only suppliers :D
Totally worth it! :laugh:

But, if you don't want to spend that kind of money, you can make your own ersatz Velveeta:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/01/cant-find-velveeta-make-your-own-cheese-sauce.html

Ingredients

8 ounces extra sharp cheddar cheese, grated on large holes of a box grater
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk
2 teaspoons Franks Red Hot or other hot sauce

Directions

1. Add cheese and cornstarch to large bowl. Toss to combine.

2. Transfer to medium saucepan. Add 1 cup evaporated milk and hot sauce. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly with whisk until melted, bubbly, and thickened (about 5 minutes). Mixture will look thin and grainy at first but will thicken and come together after heating.

3. Thin to desired consistency with additional evaporated milk. Serve immediately with fries, tortilla chips, burgers, or hot dogs.
 

Cinisajoy

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When you say 'sausage, do you mean sausage meat - finely ground pork (not pork made into sausages)?
No I do not mean finely ground pork (that is not sausage). What do you mean by pork not made into sausages?
Finely ground pork does not have seasoning. It is bulk pork sausage. It is pork ground with seasonings and them either placed in a package or made into sausage patties or links.
Here you go.
https://www.jimmydean.com/products/fresh-sausage/roll-sausage

Note to self: do not post common Southern US recipes as the poor, underprivileged* Brits cannot get some of the ingredients.
Poor and underprivileged because you do not have access to our wonderful foods.
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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When you say 'sausage, do you mean sausage meat - finely ground pork (not pork made into sausages)?
The term sausage can legitimately be applied to both seasoned ground pork in a casing - which could be called sausage links - and seasoned ground pork by itself. English is such a confusing language, particularly to native speakers of it. I graduated with an English Language degree, and I've found that the more clear I try to be, the more certain I am to confuse someone.

I've made sausage many times, but I have yet to put it into a casing. That will change with the crazy idea I have for this challenge (which will have to wait for another week, since I'm off to visit my parents in Omaha tomorrow).
 

Morning Glory

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The term sausage can legitimately be applied to both seasoned ground pork in a casing which could be called sausage links - and seasoned ground pork by itself.

This may be a difference between American English and English. In the OED sausage is defined as meat in a cylindrical length casing. In the UK, if you refer to sausage people will normally assume you mean that.

I was just trying to clarify what @Cinisajoy was referring to - I didn't really think she could mean sausages in cases. In the UK we have something called 'sausage meat' which is kind of distinct from minced pork. It is traditionally finely minced pork; almost a paste. I was wondering if that was what @Cinisajoy was using?

I said above that sausage-meat is traditionally finely ground - but increasingly, sausage-meat is being sold coarsely ground. So I'm not sure what the difference is between that and minced pork!

This is finely ground 'traditional' sausage-meat:
pork-sausage-meat.jpg

This is more coarsely ground sausage-meat:
LN_051402_BP_11.jpg

This is minced pork:
61817011_0_640x640.jpg
 

Cinisajoy

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This may be a difference between American English and English. In the OED sausage is defined as meat in a cylindrical length casing. In the UK, if you refer to sausage people will normally assume you mean that.

I was just trying to clarify what @Cinisajoy was referring to - I didn't really think she could mean sausages in cases. In the UK we have something called 'sausage meat' which is kind of distinct from minced pork. It is traditionally finely minced pork; almost a paste. I was wondering if that was what @Cinisajoy was using?

I said above that sausage-meat is traditionally finely ground - but increasingly, sausage-meat is being sold coarsely ground. So I'm not sure what the difference is between that and minced pork!

This is finely ground 'traditional' sausage-meat:
View attachment 9504

This is more coarsely ground sausage-meat:
View attachment 9505

This is minced pork:
View attachment 9506
Looking at your photos, we are having a major English/English problem.
What you posted would be sold here as ground pork.
Now yes, either of the top two would be great for making sausage.
If it ain't got sage and other seasonings, it ain't US sausage.
Here is a recipe for the sausage I am referring too.
Note you do not have to actually form it into patties.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/16359/breakfast-sausage/
 

Morning Glory

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Looking at your photos, we are having a major English/English problem.
What you posted would be sold here as ground pork.
Now yes, either of the top two would be great for making sausage.
If it ain't got sage and other seasonings, it ain't US sausage.
Here is a recipe for the sausage I am referring too.
Note you do not have to actually form it into patties.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/16359/breakfast-sausage/

Fascinating! So sausage in the US (when not referring to sausage in casing) means ground pork seasoned with sage and other seasonings? So if you buy it in a supermarket, that is what you would get?
 

Cinisajoy

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Fascinating! So sausage in the US (when not referring to sausage in casing) means ground pork seasoned with sage and other seasonings? So if you buy it in a supermarket, that is what you would get?
Yes. Or it can be made with beef or turkey now.
 
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