Sausages

Cinisajoy

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Mod.Edit. This and the following few posts have been moved from another thread.

Chorizo is not traditionally used in Paella although it is certainly common here and in the States.
Everytime you mention chorizo, I get confused. I do believe you are talking about some type of smoked sausage. Our chorizo we buy here doesn't look like that. It looks like breakfast sausage only finer and greasier and seasoned differently than pork sausage. I think it was Rocklobster who mentioned using the smoked sausage type chorizo. He is in Canada. I think in the northern states they can get it but there is no such thing down here. I have looked in the grocery stores.
I know you are in a small country, but you have to remember the US and Canada are very big countries. What is common to me, may be foreign to bucky or Lynne or Addie or Late. We have Gulf Coast shrimp and crawdads. Bucky, Lynne and Addie are close to Maine Lobster. I am pretty sure they can also get true maple syrup way cheaper than I can. I can get peppers and cilantro and tortillas and dried pinto beans much cheaper.
 
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buckytom

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There is fresh Mexican style chorizo, and Spanish style which is smoked/cured.

The Mexican kind (fresh) is becoming more common here with the influx of the Mexican olympic team (runners, jumpers, and swimmers).
:whistling:
 

Morning Glory

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Our chorizo we buy here doesn't look like that. It looks like breakfast sausage only finer and greasier and seasoned differently than pork sausage.
The defining factor in the Chorizo we are taking about is spiciness and smokiness which comes from paprika (which can vary in strength). What is your version flavoured with?
 

Morning Glory

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The Chorizo we are talking about looks like this. Its made from pork.
MGS-Chorizo.jpg
 

Cinisajoy

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The Chorizo we are talking about looks like this. Its made from pork.
View attachment 8103
Read buckytom's post.
We get fresh Mexican chorizo which cannot be cut. It is not smoked or cured.
90% of sausage is made from pork.
Ours looks more like pork breakfast sausage.
I used the word pork as a description as opposed to smoked sausage which can be made from beef, pork or chicken,
Let me put it this way. Have you ever seen minced beef? That is what our chorizo looks like only finer. As to what it is seasoned with I have no clue as it is not something eaten regularly in our house.
Let me guess you just have sausage links with skins.
 

buckytom

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Yes, Mexican chorizo is very finely ground pork that is no where near as spiced as Spanish, and as mentioned, it isn't smoked or cured.
It can have sweet paprika in it, but I believe the main spice in it is cumin.
 

Cinisajoy

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Over in another thread, we got to talking about chorizo. It got me to thinking that there are two totally different types of sausage.
There is smoked sausage like Spanish chorizo, kielbasa, bratwurst and probably at least 2 dozen others.
The meat is processed, then put in a skin. Then it is smoked and/or cured so pretty much ready to eat.

Then you have the fresh sausages (Mexican chorizo is one example) like one eats for breakfast, they can be shaped into patties, links or just crumbled. They are usually 100% pork although I think now there is a turkey sausage. You have to cook these completely to avoid the pig disease.
Hope this helps.
 
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Morning Glory

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Read buckytom's post.
We get fresh Mexican chorizo which cannot be cut. It is not smoked or cured.
90% of sausage is made from pork.
Ours looks more like pork breakfast sausage.
I used the word pork as a description as opposed to smoked sausage which can be made from beef, pork or chicken,
Let me put it this way. Have you ever seen minced beef? That is what our chorizo looks like only finer. As to what it is seasoned with I have no clue as it is not something eaten regularly in our house.
Let me guess you just have sausage links with skins.

We get all kinds of sausages but not generally flat ones. Do you mean like this - more like a burger?

1033249144001_2839215816001_breakfast-sausage-patties.jpg
 

buckytom

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The Mexican chorizo that I know looks like a type of fresh Italian sausage, but Cin would know more kinds.
 

Cinisajoy

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I just meant like the ones in the photo. Flat patties rather than plump round sausages.



View attachment 8105

So how do you cook it? Do you cut into discs and fry?
You can cut it into disks, or you can just squeeze it out and fry it like you would ground beef. You can also form it into any shape you like and bake it. You can put it in jalapeños and cook it that way. A couple of restaurants wrap it around shrimp. You can make sausage balls.

Now I do not recommend trying to cut it if it is frozen solid. I knew someone that tried that. The knife slipped. She came within a 1/4 inch of losing her life. First from the knife injury then from trichonosis.
 

buckytom

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Good morning, Worm your honor.
The crown will plainly show
The prisoner who now stands before you
Was caught red-handed showing feelings
Showing feelings of an almost human nature;
This will not do.
Call the schoolmaster!

Sorry, I love Pink Floyd.

But, your honor, there is no way that this thread should be called Sausages. It no where near encompasses the myriad of tubular meats, nay, tubular foods (yes, even the bad hunters and fishermen, erm, aka vegematarians, have sausages) with which we cook. I cannot quickly think of a culture without them.


So, Worm, your honor, can we change this thread to one describing types of chorizos?

THIS WILL NOT DO.


AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH..

(Lol, sorry. Love that album)
 
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