Recipe Tempura Udon

flyinglentris

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Tempura Udon:

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Ingredients:

1) Tempura (featuring yam, sweet potato, prawn, jalapeno pepper) - 2 pieces of each type
2) Udon noodles, dry - 12 to 15
3) Cabbage - 2 thin slices.
4) Scallion - 3
6) Miso paste - 2 packets

NOTE: Miso paste usually includes miso and pieces of nori. If powdered miso is used, include about 1/8 cup nori cut into pieces.

7) Shichimi togarashi - 1 to 2 tspns.

NOTE: It is appropriate to set the container on the table with the udon and allow the diner to add the shichimi togarashi to suite their tastes.

8) Egg - 1 to 2 (1 per serving)
9) Water - 3 to 4 cups.


Procedure:

-- Preparation --

1) Prepare the tempura.
2) Slice the roots and rough parts from the scallions.
3) Slice off two thin slices of cabbage and divide it up.

-- Udon --

1) Boil the water at 220F
2) Add the udon noodles and cook till softened.
3) Add the miso paste (or miso powder and nori).
4) Stir until the miso is evenly dissolved.
5) Add the tempura, cabbage and scallions.
6) Ladle the udon into deep soup bowls.
7) Add a sunny-side up egg on the top of the udon.
8) Serve with a container of shichimi togarashi available for spicing.
 

flyinglentris

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This sounds like a umami rich bowl. I think I would place the tempura in the the bowl on top of the udon so that they remain crispy.

That can be a possibility, depending upon the bowl. Deeper bowls are narrower and 3 to 4 pieces of tempura would be difficult to float at the top.
 

flyinglentris

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I agree. Anything deep fried should stay well clear of any liquid.

Tempura Udon is a reality and deep fried tempura is typical in the soup. Gosh, I deplore arbitrary restrictions on what can or should be done. I'm the cook.
 

Morning Glory

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Tempura Udon is a reality and deep fried tempura is typical in the soup. Gosh, I deplore arbitrary restrictions on what can or should be done. I'm the cook.

Its opinions, that's all. Sometimes its opinions based on classic cooking methods or personal experience.. Sometimes opinions are based on 'tradition'. I've seen angry 'world wars' break out on other forums over whether a certain ingredient should or should not be included in such and such a dish. Hopefully we are more civilised on this forum.

Of course, nobody is going to stop you doing what you like when you are cooking! But people are entitled to disagree or make comments, based on their opinions or experience. And you, of course, can disagree with them.
 

flyinglentris

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Its opinions, that's all. Sometimes its opinions based on classic cooking methods or personal experience.. Sometimes opinions are based on 'tradition'. I've seen angry 'world wars' break out on other forums over whether a certain ingredient should or should not be included in such and such a dish. Hopefully we are more civilised on this forum.

Of course, nobody is going to stop you doing what you like when you are cooking! But people are entitled to disagree or make comments, based on their opinions or experience. And you, of course, can disagree with them.

True enough. And I am not out to start a world war. I am just putting in my side on the issue.
 

garlichead

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Tempura Udon is a reality and deep fried tempura is typical in the soup. Gosh, I deplore arbitrary restrictions on what can or should be done. I'm the cook.
I'm familiar with the dish and I've had it many times and your right tempura is a common "garnish" for the soup. I admire your enthusiasm. You come up with more dishes in a week than I do in a year, seriously. That doesn't mean you or me are exempt from criticism. Basic cooking theory and methodology reins supreme in a kitchen. Instead of taking any criticism personally why not embrace an opportunity to further enlighten yourself and make you a better cook. I do that on a daily basis. I can't begin to tell you the amount of total failures I had early in my career and I still do have them but I don't look at them as a negative.

Getting back to tempura in udon soup. Generally speaking the tempura is placed on top of the soup as a garnish, sometimes it gets submerged and there is a point that this is still acceptable in a mouth feel and textural way which mostly has to do with the time the tempura sits in a liquid. Your example has the tempura in the soup before you poured in the liquid. Here's the basic methodology problem this creates. By the time you get your sticks moving around in the soup and commencing to take a mouthful the tempura is basically fully saturated with liquid and the opportunity for the batter to slide off completely is very high, so the crunch and texture of the tempura, which is why we made tempura in the first place is totally lost which begs the question why do it at all. Does that make any sense to you?
 

FowlersFreeTime

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Sidestepping the potential argument there, I will throw in my two cents.
Its not the first time in Japanese cooking I've seen a fried item deliberately submerged, partial or otherwise. Katsu-don is one such example where the pork cutlet is battered, deep fried, then deliberately softened with a mixture of dashi and egg before being served atop a bowl of rice.
I think regardless of assembly method, one thing is clear: a dish like this should be served immediately so as to not ruin any intended mouthfeel. Probably best suited to izakayas and restaurants with fast turnaround... and of course the enterprising home cook :)
 

caseydog

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I'm familiar with the dish and I've had it many times and your right tempura is a common "garnish" for the soup. I admire your enthusiasm. You come up with more dishes in a week than I do in a year, seriously. That doesn't mean you or me are exempt from criticism. Basic cooking theory and methodology reins supreme in a kitchen. I can't begin to tell you the amount of total failures I had early in my career and I still do have them but I don't look at them as a negative.

Good point. We can't look at the food we cook like they are our children. What I think is a great idea, other cooks may question. I can agree or not agree, but if I am wise, I'll at least consider what other cooks think.

I agree that anything tempura that will be added to a liquid, should be added at the very last moment before eating, or not at all. That's not really a recipe change, just a different way of serving.

That is also not an "arbitrary restriction," just something useful to consider.

CD
 

flyinglentris

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Sidestepping the potential argument there, I will throw in my two cents.
Its not the first time in Japanese cooking I've seen a fried item deliberately submerged, partial or otherwise. Katsu-don is one such example where the pork cutlet is battered, deep fried, then deliberately softened with a mixture of dashi and egg before being served atop a bowl of rice.
I think regardless of assembly method, one thing is clear: a dish like this should be served immediately so as to not ruin any intended mouthfeel. Probably best suited to izakayas and restaurants with fast turnaround... and of course the enterprising home cook :)

I've thought on this matter and I think for one thing, that the tempura should be added last, whether submerged in the miso or laid on top. That much, I can be in total agreement with.
 
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