Twice baked cheese soufflé.

rascal

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my wife's fave entree is this, she used to order it from an up market restaurant we used to go to. The chef drowned in his swimming pool at home about 5 years ago. I made one from the net and it was ok, but does anyone have a tried and tested one for me to try? To me this wouldn't be an entree, but wife says it is. I'm not going to argue so I'll just cook it. It uses vintage cheddar. Help please. Giggle is not my friend at times.

Russ
 

medtran49

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my wife's fave entree is this, she used to order it from an up market restaurant we used to go to. The chef drowned in his swimming pool at home about 5 years ago. I made one from the net and it was ok, but does anyone have a tried and tested one for me to try? To me this wouldn't be an entree, but wife says it is. I'm not going to argue so I'll just cook it. It uses vintage cheddar. Help please. Giggle is not my friend at times.

Russ
Just curious, why would you want to do a twice-baked souffle in a home environment? At the various recipes I've looked at for twice baked souffles, it seems the only reason is to partially cook them, then hold for later cooking just so it doesn't take as long for the final cook, like in a restaurant or if you are cooking/serving at a dinner party.

Souffles are often served as the main course with a side salad (usually) or fruit or a vege at brunch, lunch or for a light dinner. I don't think I've ever seen one offered as a starter, at least in a restaurant. Dessert and main yes.

I haven't made this particular recipe, but Alton Brown's recipes have always been reliable for us when we've made them.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/cheese-souffle-recipe-1912330

Serious Eats recipes have always worked well for us as well.

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2019/02/savory-cheese-souffle.html

I'm also thinking I would use a bit of gruyere or some other Swiss cheese as part of the cheese instead of all cheddar as the main flavoring. I don't know why I think this, but it popped into my head when I first read your post.
 
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rascal

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Just curious, why would you want to do a twice-baked souffle in a home environment? At the various recipes I've looked at for twice baked souffles, it seems the only reason is to partially cook them, then hold for later cooking just so it doesn't take as long for the final cook, like in a restaurant or if you are cooking/serving at a dinner party.

Souffles are often served as the main course with a side salad (usually) or fruit or a vege at brunch, lunch or for a light dinner. I don't think I've ever seen one offered as a starter, at least in a restaurant. Dessert and main yes.

I haven't made this particular recipe, but Alton Brown's recipes have always been reliable for us when we've made them.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/cheese-souffle-recipe-1912330

Serious Eats recipes have always worked well for us as well.

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2019/02/savory-cheese-souffle.html

I'm also thinking I would use a bit of gruyere or some other Swiss cheese as part of the cheese instead of all cheddar as the main flavoring. I don't know why I think this, but it popped into my head when I first read your post.
Thanks for info, I too have seen Gruyere as well. I thought as a main as well, but my wife says it an entree.
I'm not arguing,lol.

Russ
 

Karen W

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Souffles are very delicate, and often deflate a bit upon removing from the oven just baking them once. Can't see doing it twice. Let the eggs come to room temp, don't accidentally incorporate any eggshells from the eggs (they will inhibit rising); or have a bit of yolk in the stiffly beaten whites. Fold together carefully, and don't peek or slam doors. You can add a collar if you don't want an inflated mushroom shape but, it's not necessary, imo. I like them as a light lunch or dinner with asparagus or salad. I'll dig through my files, but think the recipe was from Jacques or Julia.
 
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