What is a "red pepper"?

CraigC

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Since he didn't specify "red chili pepper" , I would say red bell. He did use chlili powder. I know folks who make chili with green bell and only use "chili powder" with no additional "heat" from ground or fresh chilis.
 

Yorky

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Since he didn't specify "red chili pepper" , I would say red bell. He did use chlili powder. I know folks who make chili with green bell and only use "chili powder" with no additional "heat" from ground or fresh chilis.

I also know similar folks but they are not "Internationally renowned chefs" who should know better (IMO).
 

Morning Glory

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It was pointed out to me today that JO's chilli recipe (https://www.jamieoliver.com/…/be…/good-old-chilli-con-carne/) includes two "red peppers". Does anyone have any idea what these may be?

I'm sure that JO knows the difference between a bell pepper and a Carolina Reaper.

But maybe not.

In the UK red peppers always means bell peppers or what are sometimes called sweet red peppers. In the US they are usually called bell peppers. For example, in UK supermarkets they are labelled red peppers:

Screen Shot 2018-11-10 at 12.12.14.png
 

Morning Glory

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I also know similar folks but they are not "Internationally renowned chefs" who should know better (IMO).

There are countless recipes for chilli which contain only dried chillies - in fact its arguable that the authentic Mexican chilli was probably made that way. There isn't really a right or wrong way, I think.

Here is one from Great British Chefs (from a renowned chef) which uses chilli flakes and chilli powder (and coffee):
https://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/campfire-chilli-con-carne-recipe

And another from Rick Stein's Road to Mexico uses dried guajillo chillies and chipotles en adobo:
https://www.bbc.com/food/recipes/carne_con_chile_04415

This from 2 Michelin starred Tom Kerridge uses baby roquito peppers, drained (which I assume are from a jar):
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-2993769/Tom-s-time-favourites-Chilli-carne.html
 

oddduck

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If i saw something just call for red pepper i would think it was calling for a bell pepper if they were calling for cups or with just a number and if it was listed by teaspoons i would assume it was calling for red pepper flakes.
 

Yorky

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There are countless recipes for chilli which contain only dried chillies - in fact its arguable that the authentic Mexican chilli was probably made that way. There isn't really a right or wrong way, I think.

My point is that "red pepper" means nothing to me and if included in a recipe it should be defined. It always aggravates me when folks specify a temperature but don't include the scale, i.e. Fahrenheit, Celcius or even Kelvin.
 

Morning Glory

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My point is that "red pepper" means nothing to me and if included in a recipe it should be defined. It always aggravates me when folks specify a temperature but don't include the scale, i.e. Fahrenheit, Celcius or even Kelvin.

I know. But in the UK, red pepper means what is known in the US and probably elsewhere as red bell pepper. Its difficult for recipe ingredients to always be universally understood. There are so many ingredients which have different names in different English speaking countries. I try to include the obvious US/UK differences where I can - like coriander/cilantro or courgette/zucchini. And I often do specify 'bell peppers' too - but I'm sure I haven't always done that in every recipe.

Re the temperature point I don't know. I am certainly guilty! I only ever include Celsius in my recipes... :ohmy:
 

oddduck

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Most recipes are created In local terms...i don't know that someone somewhere else does not know what i mean when i say red pepper...red peppers is obviously a red bell in my world...its not anything else, i have no frame of reference that someone would not know what a red pepper is or mean something different in their world.

Me and my sis were actually speaking about my mother's recipes today on the phone as we were talking about Thanksgiving. Mom's recipes were often handed down to her orally or by observation. Her recipe for creamed cucumbers specify two squirts of mustard...in her world mustard came in a squirt bottle...but i have seen mustard in jars so perhaps two squirts would not make sense to those in a jarred mustard world but i have no other way of telling someone how much mustard to add than two squirts as my mustard comes in a squirt bottle too...actually i have never seen mom's recipe call for two squirts, that was what my sis got told to her when she moved away when she got married...i just make it like i saw mom did then make adjustments for taste.
 

buckytom

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I would call those Thai Bird chilis.

I've grown them in my old garden. Love the heat.
 

oddduck

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Thats my point...i have no idea what those kind of peppers are nor that they exist so i can not expect that there is a diiferent meaning to red pepper elsewhere so my recipe likely would call for a red pepper thinking everyone red peppers were bells.

While there are other peppers that are red here those would be call something different than red pepper...aka salad pepper, bird pepper, hot pepper etc. if i go to my favorite pizza joint snd asked for red peppers on my pizza they don't question what i mean they know that we are both talking about bell peppers.

Just like green peppers, here it means a green bell even tho we also have poblano, habinaros, jalapeños etc that are also green but never referred to as such.

And one more example that occurs to me...i once worked at a movie theater...we sold popcorn...salted buttered popcorn...we just call it popcorn...a trio of people come and order some and i dutifully scoop it up and hand it to them. The third man in the group pinches some popped kernels off the top and tosses them in his mouth and promptly makes a face and spits them out into his hand and tells me i forgot the sugar. Now american popcorn does not have sugar...he does not know this and is from another country and i do not know that popcorn in the country that he is from is sugar coated. I now realize his popcorn is our kettle corn but at the time kettle corn was not very well known here so i had no idea why the dude was expecting sugar on his popcorn but the two other people explained he was for someplace else and it was ok and took the popcorn for themselves and got him a candy bar which he dealt with much better.
 

Morning Glory

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My point is that "red pepper" means nothing to me and if included in a recipe it should be defined. It always aggravates me when folks specify a temperature but don't include the scale, i.e. Fahrenheit, Celcius or even Kelvin.
Please note that posts relating to weights, measures and temperatures have been moved to a new thread - see here
 
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