What's going on in your garden?

rascal

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I don't follow horse racing. I know about the Kentucky Derby because it is a really big deal in the US. It is almost a national holiday. :laugh:

BTW, I've been to a Derby Day party. It was hoot.

CD

I can imagine that, like Melbourne cup, so many people, not many into racing though, just show ponies. Kentucky day Super Bowl and a few others I try not to miss them. A lot of American bloodlines in our stock here. Especially standard breds aka harness. I have my own tesio computer programme for breeding.

Russ
 

Morning Glory

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No thanks, you can have my share. I hate mint. Didn't know that until I planted it and started trying it in stuff. It's disgusting.

There are quite a few different types of mint and some are much more delicate and subtle tasting than the standard mint that most people grow. There is even a pineapple mint:

StackPath
 

caseydog

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There are quite a few different types of mint and some are much more delicate and subtle tasting than the standard mint that most people grow. There is even a pineapple mint:

StackPath

My local garden centers sell "peppermint" plants. I suspect that's just marketing, and they are exactly the same as "mint" plants. They look the same. Either way, I don't want them anywhere near my garden.

CD
 

Mountain Cat

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I'm looking for the garlic and onion starts to... start. Not yet.

Four rhubarb plants I added last fall are beginning to emerge from the soil.

11 of the saffron crocuses I put in last fall are doing well, leaf-wise. I think they'll bloom late in the year. I covered them over the height of winter. (And snow covered them further.)

Either today or tomorrow I will be potting up the seeds I want to have started to transplant, mostly tomatoes. I should go down and buy t seed potatoes at the local farm supply store.
 

TastyReuben

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There are quite a few different types of mint and some are much more delicate and subtle tasting than the standard mint that most people grow. There is even a pineapple mint:

StackPath
I noticed pineapple mint at the gardening shop yesterday. I gave it the finger when I walked by. :laugh:

Chef John (Food Wishes online) has mentioned before that in the culinary world, you probably want spearmint, not mint, as it's more palatable, but I'm not willing to plant it to find out. :)
 

Mountain Cat

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When I first planted it, I asked all around about an herb garden, and over and over again, "You have to have mint! Mint!"

Then it started spreading and I went back to the same people and complained that the 🤬 mint was taking over my herb garden, and they all said, "Well, yeah, you can't plant that right in the ground, you know."

Thanks for telling me that before, people! 😒

The worst part is...after planting it and trying it in several things, I don't like it. At all. Except in a mint julep.

Now I just go out every couple of weeks and pull it up, and pull it up, and pull it up.
Mint: I had some back early on at my old house. It started to move out into the lawn, but at least we could mow over it. But the bulk was right next to the house as part of the foundation greenery.

I had to have my in-ground oil tank removed and a new one put indoors. The top of the oil tank was about 2-3 feet under the foundation plant area where the mint was, and the bottom about six feet down. Tank was removed, and of course all the foundation plants above were destroyed. They turned remaining soil upside down to the bottom of the pit, and added more (fresh) soil atop.

Well, next spring, up came the mint!!!

Jerusalem artichokes/Sunchokes: Some people gave me these, and I planted them. They later denied they gave them to me. At any rate, not knowing how tall or invasive they'd be, they ended up in front of my front doorway. They grow to 7 or so feet tall! And they spread like crazy, and if you don't get out the entirity of the roots, they grow back from there, too.

As they are attractive when they bloom, i kept them for a few years. Then I spent about three years trying to eradicate. I did decimate them. BUT...

Some followed me up here when I tried transplanting a couple other plants in my current side yard. I can deal with them there!
 
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My little garden did not survive the winter very well. Most things are still brown, and probably not coming back. But, in the lower right hand corner, the chives seem to be doing just fine.
 
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Morning Glory

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I'm going to have to cut them back already. Also, expect to see chive garnish on everything from my beef stew to the tea and biscuits I have for my evening snack. :laugh:

Do you use the flowers when they appear? Fantastic sprinkled in salads.

Asparagus, egg, avocado dressing (this was last year in late May):

61176
 
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