What's going on in your garden?

rascal

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Mine is about 6 inches high!
As good the peas, I do final have done snow peas but that is all. The only thing doing well are the potatoes tbh. They are finally growing and are now roughly 9 inches to maybe a foot high! Buy they are not Christmas stock, they are main crop with a 18 -22 week growing period and a recent frost left some damaged so I couldn't sew them any earlier. I'm still likely to see more frost this month as it is!
Spuds here are sown and self sewn from last year. More than enough for Xmas day.

Russ
 

Lullabelle

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I have just watched a youtube clip of Self Sufficient Me, he buries kitchen scraps directly into the ground instead of using a compost bin-great idea.
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

A Reforming Perfectionist
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We have various compost bins. The tumbler works best here. No problems keeping it warm. The biggest problem is getting hubby to understand that it isn't just kitchen scraps that he must put in it. He has to put brown dry waste in there as well. The silly thing is that we have plenty of wood shavings that can go in there from the nesting boxes for the chickens.
In the uk, the biggest problem we had with our compost bin was getting it warm. We used to have a 2 acres garden, where most of it was native woodland with thousands of orchids growing in it. At the edge of the lawn, where the woodland started, we had our 7 compost bins. 3 were for leaf litter only so that should give you an idea on how long it took for matter to decompose. the other 4 were for garden & kitchen matter combined. Each compost bin was made up from a combination of pallets. A season would see us needing 2 compost bins or 7 pallets in total. Here in Australia, that kind of system is a much too inviting area for snakes, so we don't compost anymore with the exception of kitchen scraps in the tumbler. All garden waste is taken to the tip to be recycled. They don't charge for it and it is much less of a fire hazzard as well.
 

rascal

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We have various compost bins. The tumbler works best here. No problems keeping it warm. The biggest problem is getting hubby to understand that it isn't just kitchen scraps that he must put in it. He has to put brown dry waste in there as well. The silly thing is that we have plenty of wood shavings that can go in there from the nesting boxes for the chickens.
In the uk, the biggest problem we had with our compost bin was getting it warm. We used to have a 2 acres garden, where most of it was native woodland with thousands of orchids growing in it. At the edge of the lawn, where the woodland started, we had our 7 compost bins. 3 were for leaf litter only so that should give you an idea on how long it took for matter to decompose. the other 4 were for garden & kitchen matter combined. Each compost bin was made up from a combination of pallets. A season would see us needing 2 compost bins or 7 pallets in total. Here in Australia, that kind of system is a much too inviting area for snakes, so we don't compost anymore with the exception of kitchen scraps in the tumbler. All garden waste is taken to the tip to be recycled. They don't charge for it and it is much less of a fire hazzard as well.
Wife put wrong stuff in hers. I remember granddad putting lawn clippings and food scraps. I don't think she added water for moisture, I remember sweet smelling compost. Not like her disaster,lol.

Russ
 

Lullabelle

Midlands, England
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We have various compost bins. The tumbler works best here. No problems keeping it warm. The biggest problem is getting hubby to understand that it isn't just kitchen scraps that he must put in it. He has to put brown dry waste in there as well. The silly thing is that we have plenty of wood shavings that can go in there from the nesting boxes for the chickens.
In the uk, the biggest problem we had with our compost bin was getting it warm. We used to have a 2 acres garden, where most of it was native woodland with thousands of orchids growing in it. At the edge of the lawn, where the woodland started, we had our 7 compost bins. 3 were for leaf litter only so that should give you an idea on how long it took for matter to decompose. the other 4 were for garden & kitchen matter combined. Each compost bin was made up from a combination of pallets. A season would see us needing 2 compost bins or 7 pallets in total. Here in Australia, that kind of system is a much too inviting area for snakes, so we don't compost anymore with the exception of kitchen scraps in the tumbler. All garden waste is taken to the tip to be recycled. They don't charge for it and it is much less of a fire hazzard as well.
Wife bought a compost bin about 12 months, it's a disaster. Luckily I've stayed out of it.

Russ
We have a compost bin but it has been neglected. As we are sorting out the back garden it may be useful to start now ready for next year.
 

rascal

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I suppose you guys aren't in summer so not a lot going in your gardens. We're picking courgettes, peas, strawberries, raspberries, butter beans, green beans, potatoes (new, cliff kidney) one cucumber and gerkins. Tomatoes are just ripening now, these are really late this year. Should have been picking a month ago, chillies and corn is almost ready.
Herbs are all good too.

Russ
 

rascal

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Still picking strawberries and raspberries for the freezer, courgettes and gerkins/ pickles ( for preserving) wife's picking chillies beans and peas still. I just started propagating coriander/cilantro, more red peppers (capsicum) and two types of tomato are new to me. Hope I'm not too late in the season. One month of summer left here then Autumn/fall. Wife has access to a greenhouse , a big one so she wants more plants.

Russ
 

rascal

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It's quiet here, I guess most are in winter still. Found swede/ rutabagas growing. I grew some seeds with no label, wife planted and just realised yesterday we have 3 in the garden. Still picking daily. Pickling gerkins/ pickles about every four days.

Russ
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Quiet because little grows without rain.
But when the rain comes and washed away all the soil, even less grows....

But the potatoes are recovering after Monday's floods, sweet potatoes just starting to rampage... the odd tomatoes is ripe, eaten straight from the vine. Lemons recovering, herbs recovering, grapes swelling ready to be better this weekend, olives starting to grow and a random squash starting to fruit now it had water again. I think that's it sadly. And the 2 massive fog trees now have water enough to produce fruit if the wild birds leave me any. All other fruit is gone. Decimated earlier in the season by starving wild life.
 
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