What's going on in your garden?

rascal

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We have been picking and freezing peas daily. Grandkids ate raspberries off the bushes last Sunday, I'm freezing these now. I need to make jam as were nearly out. Chillies are slowly getting there but won't be picking any time soon. Wet this whole week. New potatoes are behind as well. Radishes lettuces and spring onions are ready.

Russ
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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We have been picking and freezing peas daily. Grandkids ate raspberries off the bushes last Sunday, I'm freezing these now. I need to make jam as were nearly out. Chillies are slowly getting there but won't be picking any time soon. Wet this whole week. New potatoes are behind as well. Radishes lettuces and spring onions are ready.

Russ
Crickey, we've only just stopped having frosts. Even this week we've had single degree mornings. My rhubarb is doing well but little else is flowing except for the tomato plant I bought already in flower (that is veg and fruit wise).

My lemon tree is in full flower this morning after yesterday's exceptionally heavy rain.
My courgettes are seedlings! Only came up last week, same for the cucumber, watermelon, rockmelon and a few others. Even the naturally seeded tomatoes are only a few inches high (found 3 plants growing in the veg plot. No idea where they came from because I've never grown tomatoes in the veg plot, only on the veranda!

I'll add a few pictures, but this was the weekend rhubarb harvest.

51113
 

rascal

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Crickey, we've only just stopped having frosts. Even this week we've had single degree mornings. My rhubarb is doing well but little else is flowing except for the tomato plant I bought already in flower (that is veg and fruit wise).

My lemon tree is in full flower this morning after yesterday's exceptionally heavy rain.
My courgettes are seedlings! Only came up last week, same for the cucumber, watermelon, rockmelon and a few others. Even the naturally seeded tomatoes are only a few inches high (found 3 plants growing in the veg plot. No idea where they came from because I've never grown tomatoes in the veg plot, only on the veranda!

I'll add a few pictures, but this was the weekend rhubarb harvest.

View attachment 51113


We had about a 10 day mini heat wave here a week ago. Crapola now!!

Russ
 

Burt Blank

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We have been picking and freezing peas daily. Grandkids ate raspberries off the bushes last Sunday, I'm freezing these now. I need to make jam as were nearly out. Chillies are slowly getting there but won't be picking any time soon. Wet this whole week. New potatoes are behind as well. Radishes lettuces and spring onions are ready.

Russ
Mate, I really envy you and SatNavSaysStraightOn
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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rascal

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A quick tour of my garden... this is the veg and herbs, fruits side of it. Click on the gallery to get larger images. Each image had a quick description once you are in the media gallery.


There are about 30 images before we go to last year's images.

And the rest of the garden can be found here...


Great shots. My propagating area looks like yours, only smaller.

Russ
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Great shots. My propagating area looks like yours, only smaller.

Russ
Mine is a length of fencing (homemade of course) that has been repurposed since it was not needed for the veg plot fencing. It keeps the chooks off seedlings which they would decimate in a single sitting given half a chance... mind you self stuffed chicken...
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Mate, I really envy you and SatNavSaysStraightOn
We've gone from single degree nights to +37°C inside of 2 weeks. Our spring has sprung and summer is now in its infancy. Last night when I went to bed it was still 22°C (luckily it slowly dropped during the night down to 14 °C this morning but it is clearly the start of summer. That means most things will die. Curiously the growing season here is much the same as the UK, March/April through to October or November (with a bit of luck). Most things just decide to accept the drought and heat and hibernate or go dormant during summer instead.

Ordering perishable goods now requires express delivery, in poly boxes with freezer packs... my vegan chocolates have just arrived in one such delivery.

It is also a time of lights on, thermally shielded blinds down, doors closed and living in the dark during the day. The only time you go out is first thing in the morning. You open up when the outside temp is cooler than the inside temperature and close up when you get up to try to keep the house as cool as possible. Difficult when insulation was not the norm until quite recently and everywhere is tin roofing! Oddly Aussies seem to have missed the fact that insulation works 2 ways (but also stops the house getting cooler quickly at night) and they just accept it gets darn hot during the summer. When it exceeds 40°C we go shopping or to the cinema. Even the car air-conditioning can't cope with above 40°C. A sunroof is not a sunroof here but a moonroof because its the only time of day you'll be mad enough to pull back that visor and use it. The worst we've had is 44.7°C last summer though we've never lost any chickens to the heat despite having typically 'heavy set, winter hardy breeds because we take precautions the day before and house down any dusty areas in shade so that the area is damp and cool for the following day.

December typically heats up here with January being the record-setting month. From now on you'll find me posting weird and wonderful cold soup recipes simply because it becomes too hot to eat hot soups and we usually only eat soups for evening meals (or my salad plates). I'm calorie watching again...
 

Burt Blank

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We've gone from single degree nights to +37°C inside of 2 weeks. Our spring has sprung and summer is now in its infancy. Last night when I went to bed it was still 22°C (luckily it slowly dropped during the night down to 14 °C this morning but it is clearly the start of summer. That means most things will die. Curiously the growing season here is much the same as the UK, March/April through to October or November (with a bit of luck). Most things just decide to accept the drought and heat and hibernate or go dormant during summer instead.

Ordering perishable goods now requires express delivery, in poly boxes with freezer packs... my vegan chocolates have just arrived in one such delivery.

It is also a time of lights on, thermally shielded blinds down, doors closed and living in the dark during the day. The only time you go out is first thing in the morning. You open up when the outside temp is cooler than the inside temperature and close up when you get up to try to keep the house as cool as possible. Difficult when insulation was not the norm until quite recently and everywhere is tin roofing! Oddly Aussies seem to have missed the fact that insulation works 2 ways (but also stops the house getting cooler quickly at night) and they just accept it gets darn hot during the summer. When it exceeds 40°C we go shopping or to the cinema. Even the car air-conditioning can't cope with above 40°C. A sunroof is not a sunroof here but a moonroof because its the only time of day you'll be mad enough to pull back that visor and use it. The worst we've had is 44.7°C last summer though we've never lost any chickens to the heat despite having typically 'heavy set, winter hardy breeds because we take precautions the day before and house down any dusty areas in shade so that the area is damp and cool for the following day.

December typically heats up here with January being the record-setting month. From now on you'll find me posting weird and wonderful cold soup recipes simply because it becomes too hot to eat hot soups and we usually only eat soups for evening meals (or my salad plates). I'm calorie watching again...
I sympathies we live in an apartment in an old thick walled stone house. The outside has been completely clad in insulation. Our elderly neighbors downstairs have tremendous vegetable plots built into the hill side. Average temps in the summer are 35/38c. The house was built with rainwater tanks underneath it. Carmillo fitted a pump so his wife has enough water for the garden in the dry season. Water is quite cheap here anyway and I have never heard of a drought unlike in the UK. I think this has to do with the small population 4 million in a large country. The last really bad heat wave was a few years before the 2019. Split had a week of temperature ranging from 45/49c. It caused quite a few deaths of elderly people. Pensioners are advised to spend there days in the air conditioned malls. Record Heatwave on the Horizon? Adriatic Coast on Red Alert
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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I sympathies we live in an apartment in an old thick walled stone house. The outside has been completely clad in insulation. Our elderly neighbors downstairs have tremendous vegetable plots built into the hill side. Average temps in the summer are 35/38c. The house was built with rainwater tanks underneath it. Carmillo fitted a pump so his wife has enough water for the garden in the dry season. Water is quite cheap here anyway and I have never heard of a drought unlike in the UK. I think this has to do with the small population 4 million in a large country. The last really bad heat wave was a few years before the 2019. Split had a week of temperature ranging from 45/49c. It caused quite a few deaths of elderly people. Pensioners are advised to spend there days in the air conditioned malls. Record Heatwave on the Horizon? Adriatic Coast on Red Alert
we have a dedicated 22,000 liter tank that is runoff from the house. Our drinking water comes from a separate gravity fed system from the shearingshed slightly uphill from the house.
Anyhow the one from the house has now been fitted witha pump in the last few days. I still have to run electricity to the pump when I want to useit but I can at long last have a little power behind my hose pipe and actually water the plants on the higher side of the house!

I used to live in a very thickly walled house When I lived in the Lake District in the UK. There we could easily sit on the windowsill, feet up and close the curtains and still have room for another person beside you. The walls were 1-1-5m thick and at the back of the farmhouse the ground went all the way up to the 1st floor windows! The house used to stay so cool in summer that you still needed an open fire in the sitting room in the evenings.
 
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