Accents and dialects

rascal

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What pi&&$& me off is people saying aksed instead of asked. How hard is it to pronounce it right.
I find if hard to understand the scots people. And recently in my fave Vietnamese bakery I struck an older women who I had to ask what was in the pie I was buying, it was steak and cheese and tomato. I had to ask 4 times until I got it. :)

Russ
 

Duck59

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The north-east of England has a few "groups" whereby people from certain places are known by certain names. As you will have noted (come on, pay attention at the back), there are Geordies (from Newcastle and other parts of Tyneside) and Mackems (from Sunderland). Going a little further south, Teesiders (from Middlesbrough and around that area) are known as Smoggies. This is a reference to the history of industry in that part of the world, notably the large number of chemical plants.

There are also people from Hartlepool, a town on the County Durham coast. They are known as Monkey Hangers, after a (highly dubious) story of a French ship being shipwrecked and the only survivor, the ship's monkey, being hanged as a French spy.

Incidentally, none of these terms are pejorative - people from these places commonly refer to themselves as such. I have a friend from Hartlepool and he routinely describes himself as a Monkey Hanger.
 

Timenspace

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What pi&&$& me off is people saying aksed instead of asked. How hard is it to pronounce it right.
I find if hard to understand the scots people. And recently in my fave Vietnamese bakery I struck an older women who I had to ask what was in the pie I was buying, it was steak and cheese and tomato. I had to ask 4 times until I got it. :)

Russ
As you mention scots, I learned that 'wee' as little, is a scots word...very good video, will post the link later...

Yes, and expecially instead of especially...I guess speech gets wracked at times...🤷😊
 

caseydog

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It's certainly prevalent in my area, but I don't know where else it may occur.

What I remember most from the two years I lived in the Cincinnati burbs was that everyone had a German name... and was Catholic. We moved in, with our Italian name, and we're Lutherans. I went to public school, while all my neighborhood friends went to Catholic school. The family across the street prayed for us. There is quite possibly a movie in that scenario.

CD
 

caseydog

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The north-east of England has a few "groups" whereby people from certain places are known by certain names. As you will have noted (come on, pay attention at the back), there are Geordies (from Newcastle and other parts of Tyneside) and Mackems (from Sunderland). Going a little further south, Teesiders (from Middlesbrough and around that area) are known as Smoggies. This is a reference to the history of industry in that part of the world, notably the large number of chemical plants.

There are also people from Hartlepool, a town on the County Durham coast. They are known as Monkey Hangers, after a (highly dubious) story of a French ship being shipwrecked and the only survivor, the ship's monkey, being hanged as a French spy.

Incidentally, none of these terms are pejorative - people from these places commonly refer to themselves as such. I have a friend from Hartlepool and he routinely describes himself as a Monkey Hanger.

When I worked for a software company that was bought by a company based in Newcastle, their board of directors would come to Dallas about twice a year, and since I was a senior manager, I spent a lot of the time they were here with them. They were all very laid back, and funny. One guy would toss out Newcastle and British terms just to mess with the Americans in the boardroom (in a fun way). I will never forget him responding to a challenge we were facing by sayin, "Keep your peckers up." All the Americans just looked at each other. He did later explain that "pecker" meant "nose" in Britain, after he grinned and watched the Americans squirm, and people laughed. "Pecker" means some other part of the male anatomy here.

Of course, we got to introduce him to the jalapeño pepper with a tequila shot chaser. That's when we knew for sure that he had a sense of humor -- none of us got fired.

CD
 
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Duck59

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On Scottish accents: there is a great variety and accents can be very different even a few miles away. Edinburgh and Glasgow are only about 45 miles (70 kilometres) apart, but the two cities have hugely different accents. You'll get different accents within the cities as well; Edinburgh ranges from the posh Morningside accent to the Trainspotting tones of Leith.

You'll see the difference with a lot of words, too. Take, for example, words meaning children in the east and west. On the eastern side, people will use the word bairns, also used in the north-east of England. In the west, children are weans (pronounced wains). A rough cut-off point is Falkirk, around half way between Edinburgh and Glasgow. To the west of Falkirk, weans is the common currency.

One common myth is that the further north in Scotland you go, the harder the accents are to understand. This, generally speaking, isn't the case. People from the Highlands tend to speak more slowly and an Inverness accent, for example, is pretty easy to follow. Glasgwegians (or Weegies as they're commonly known), often speak very quickly and tend not to enunciate words, so they can be hard to decipher at times. The accents of the Scottish Borders can also be tricky. That's not unusual for the more rural areas - despite coming from Newcastle and having no problem with even quite dense Geordie accents, I can struggle to understand what someone from rural Northumberland is saying.
 

Timenspace

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That's not unusual for the more rural areas - despite coming from Newcastle and having no problem with even quite dense Geordie accents, I can struggle to understand what someone from rural Northumberland is saying.
It is a relief to hear that native speakers struggle too.
For me in Croatia,the same with some dialects.
This is what I saw.
View: https://youtu.be/8X5zX3yVoiQ


I truly found it helpful to have the poem at the end of that video fragmentized and analysed.
 
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