Charcoal Grilling

caseydog

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Looking at the pics I need to do another rotisserie cook. Soon.

Russ

Yeah, I need to do one too. I have a nice organic chicken in the freezer that I got on sale. I need to thaw it, brine it and put it on the spit (rotisserie).

CD
 

Burt Blank

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Heavy White smoke:roflmao:
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I think I will carry on Soaking Matron
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Hemulen

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Russers do you hot smoke fish ? these are trout. The plate shows the trout delicately perfumed by the dense white soaked apple wood smoke. View attachment 49495 View attachment 49496 View attachment 49497
Not a question for me but we smoke fish all summer long on open fire in a steel box made by my father-in-law. We soak the fish (often one or two "muddy" carp breams from the fish net), use moist, freshly cut alder chips (made from twigs) and juniper for the smoke. The alder chips quickly turn into "charcoal". Sometimes we add a cube of sugar to intensify the color. The fish is kept in a plastic bag in the fridge with coarse sea salt for a couple of hours before smudging. Then it's placed on straws on a mesh inside the box. It takes about 45-60 minutes to make a "trash fish" like carp bream to taste very good. The leftovers are great in salad with apples, onions, cucumber, boiled eggs and a sweet'n'sour dressing with Nordic light sour cream, vinegar, mustard, salt, sugar, mustard and spices.
 
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Burt Blank

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Not a question for me but we smoke fish all summer long on open fire in a steel box made by my father-in-law. We soak the fish (often one or two "muddy" carp breams from the fish net), use moist, freshly cut alder chips (made from twigs) and juniper for the smoke. The alder chips quickly turn into "charcoal". Sometimes we add a cube of sugar to intensify the color. The fish is kept in a plastic bag in the fridge with coarse sea salt for a couple of hours before smudging. Then it's placed on straws on a mesh inside the box. It takes about 45-60 minutes to make a "trash fish" like carp bream to taste very good. The leftovers are great in salad with apples, onions, cucumber, boiled eggs and a sweet'n'sour dressing with Nordic light sour cream, vinegar, mustard, salt, sugar, mustard and spices.
Hemers I used to buy live eels from Manchester's wholesale F/market. I would brine them and then hot smoke. For me it is one of the best hot smoked "fish" I have eaten. Served cold with new pots and horseradish sauce:p::p:
 
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rascal

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Termyn8or

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I am in firm agreement with the hot side/cool side idea.. Thought I invented it actually. Well I guess I did but so did bunch of people I guess.

I takes a little getting used to to use properly, Now I can make steaks from black n blue (mine) to well and have them come out at almost the same time.

I do use charcoal, it imparts a flavor to the meat that I like that propane does not, but I do not smoke.

Evenly spread coals are for pork, chicken and a few other things - when they are done they are done. There are no degrees like with beef steaks.

T
 

medtran49

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I am in firm agreement with the hot side/cool side idea.. Thought I invented it actually. Well I guess I did but so did bunch of people I guess.

I takes a little getting used to to use properly, Now I can make steaks from black n blue (mine) to well and have them come out at almost the same time.

I do use charcoal, it imparts a flavor to the meat that I like that propane does not, but I do not smoke.

Evenly spread coals are for pork, chicken and a few other things - when they are done they are done. There are no degrees like with beef steaks.

T

Zones are used for searing at the beginning or end of your cook, depending on what you are trying to accomplish. As well as moving your protein around to get an even cook if say 1 part is thicker than another. Say like with wings. The flaps need a lower temp than the drumettes do. Craig uses zone cooking all the time when he BBQs, especially with chicken and pork.
 

Termyn8or

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Agreed, I didn't think of the different chicken pieces and how much they vary in mass and volume.

With the steaks, Only the black n blue ones do not go on at the start. There is always a sear, and then the ones they want cooked go to the cooler side.

Another thing is that with Tbones or porterhouses, the bone goes over the hotspot first. Any steak with a significant bone.

T
 
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