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LissaC

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In Portuguese, The Netherlands are always called Holanda (a quite literal translation of Holland). It can also be called Países Baixos (which is the translation for Netherlands, literally means low countries) but the term is not so widely used.
 

Windigo

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In Portuguese, The Netherlands are always called Holanda (a quite literal translation of Holland). It can also be called Países Baixos (which is the translation for Netherlands, literally means low countries) but the term is not so widely used.

No we know, that's why I said it's a common misconception. But for us Dutchies, it's a little weird that our allies still use a term we don't use at all unless it's football related. For some reason with football we're suddenly 'holland'.
 

LissaC

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No we know, that's why I said it's a common misconception. But for us Dutchies, it's a little weird that our allies still use a term we don't use at all unless it's football related. For some reason with football we're suddenly 'holland'.
Yes, I guess it would be like calling Algarve to Portugal. I had no idea Holland is the name of the province where Amsterdam is or why The Netherlands go by the two names, now I understand why.
 

Windigo

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Yes, I guess it would be like calling Algarve to Portugal. I had no idea Holland is the name of the province where Amsterdam is or why The Netherlands go by the two names, now I understand why.

What also caused this is that during our famous pirating and sea faring days in the 18th century, a lot of Dutch ships would have 'Holland' written on them. This was because most of our war ships and and commercial fleet were made in the docks of North and South Holland (the provinces). So we were seen as 'Hollanders' though that was not the name of the entire country. The oldest mention of 'Holland' comes from the vikings, who called our country Holt Land, which means woodland.
 

caseydog

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Just going to be a little pain here but, we're not actually called Holland. It's an Anglo saxon way of calling our country, but we call our country 'Nederland' and our official name is 'The Netherlands'.

The name 'Holland' is only linked to us because it's the province/state Amsterdam (our capital) is found in.

When I was a kid, the "official" Mercan name for your country was Holland, but now it is always referred to as The Netherlands on the news, and quite often, by ordinary people.

BTW, their is a Nederland, Texas. It is a town on the Gulf coast near my hometown. My best friend lives there. I'm certain it is pronounced wrong.

CD
 

Windigo

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When I was a kid, the "official" Mercan name for your country was Holland, but now it is always referred to as The Netherlands on the news, and quite often, by ordinary people.

BTW, their is a Nederland, Texas. It is a town on the Gulf coast near my hometown. My best friend lives there. I'm certain it is pronounced wrong.

CD

There is an 'America' here too, in the province of Limburg :laugh: The reason why Americans use Holland, is probably because of what I posted above - due to our sea faring ways. Back in the day, the Holland - America line was a very chique boat from Amsterdam to New York.
 

caseydog

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There is an 'America' here too, in the province of Limburg :laugh: The reason why Americans use Holland, is probably because of what I posted above - due to our sea faring ways. Back in the day, the Holland - America line was a very chique boat from Amsterdam to New York.

It is a rather confusing place. The name is The Netherlands, but is also called often Holland, and the people and language are Dutch. Then there is Great Britain, the British Isles, and the United Kingdom/UK.

The United States of America is often just called America, although America is actually two Continents, North and South, and consists of more countries than just the USA.

CD
 

Windigo

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It is a rather confusing place. The name is The Netherlands, but is also called often Holland, and the people and language are Dutch. Then there is Great Britain, the British Isles, and the United Kingdom/UK.

The United States of America is often just called America, although America is actually two Continents, North and South, and consists of more countries than just the USA.

CD

Well the language is Dutch to other countries, but we call it 'Nederlands' and ourselves' Nederlanders '. And Pennsylvania Dutch, are actually Germans. To make it all more confusing :rolleyes:
 

caseydog

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Well the language is Dutch to other countries, but we call it 'Nederlands' and ourselves' Nederlanders '. And Pennsylvania Dutch, are actually Germans. To make it all more confusing :rolleyes:

Yes, I knew the Pennsylvania Dutch thing.

CD
 

MrsDangermouse

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It's as strange to us as when we would call the UK 'London ' . That's why I said it, it's a common misconception. Not blaming you for it if that's what you thought :love:
We always call your country The Netherlands because I was already aware of the difference, but I've often wondered what it sounds like when you hear an English-speaker calling it Holland. I assumed it was like a Scot hearing the UK referred to as England - but maybe without the nationalistic overtones?

What also caused this is that during our famous pirating and sea faring days in the 18th century,
And nowadays, despite being a relatively small country you are still some of the most adventurous travellers :okay: Wherever we've been in Europe, on virtually every campsite we've been on, your country men and women tend to outnumber all the other foreign visitors :)

Then there is Great Britain, the British Isles, and the United Kingdom/UK.
All three are actually different things....

"British Isles" is a geographical designation rather than a political or national one and is the geographical name for the group of islands that sit off the north west coast of Europe, which include the political entities of UK, Ireland and the Isle of Man.

"Great Britain" can refer geographically to the largest of the islands (on which you can find England, Scotland and Wales), or it can be shorthand for........

"The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Island" (to give it its full name). Which is the political entity/country that most of the world variously refers to as "Britain", "Great Britain", "The UK" or "The United Kingdom".

I think that just about covers it :wink:
 

Windigo

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We always call your country The Netherlands because I was already aware of the difference, but I've often wondered what it sounds like when you hear an English-speaker calling it Holland. I assumed it was like a Scot hearing the UK referred to as England - but maybe without the nationalistic overtones?

:wink:

It's actually like the UK being referred to as London, or 'East riding of Yorkshire ' . We have 12 counties (we call them provincies) and North and South Holland are like North and South Yorkshire.
 
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