Herb garden advice

caseydog

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Joined
25 Aug 2019
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10:31 PM
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618
Location
Dallas, TX
I agree with pretty much everything already posted.

In my North Texas gardens, I grow rosemary, thyme, basil, oregano, flat leaf parsley and a few varieties of peppers.

The oregano, rosemary and thyme survive winters here, including snow cover -- although snow only covers the ground for a week or two (at most) per winter. We didn't get any snow last winter. The parsley survived last winter, but was pretty leggy and sparse this summer.

My basil doesn't survive winter, no mater how mild. You also need to do some prunning as your basil plants flower and try to go to seed. To extend the life of the plant, snip the flower/seed pods off with scissors as soon as they show up. As the end of the growing season arrives, you may have to do this a couple times per week, but it only takes a minute or two.

I tried cilantro, but as said, it dies at the first signs of hot Texas summer weather. You may have better luck in Ohio.

Also as mentioned, oregano spreads low and very wide, but it can be managed with some scissors (or a weed whacker).

CD
 

rascal

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18 Mar 2018
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5:31 PM
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5,805
Location
Christchurch New Zealand
I agree with pretty much everything already posted.

In my North Texas gardens, I grow rosemary, thyme, basil, oregano, flat leaf parsley and a few varieties of peppers.

The oregano, rosemary and thyme survive winters here, including snow cover -- although snow only covers the ground for a week or two (at most) per winter. We didn't get any snow last winter. The parsley survived last winter, but was pretty leggy and sparse this summer.

My basil doesn't survive winter, no mater how mild. You also need to do some prunning as your basil plants flower and try to go to seed. To extend the life of the plant, snip the flower/seed pods off with scissors as soon as they show up. As the end of the growing season arrives, you may have to do this a couple times per week, but it only takes a minute or two.

I tried cilantro, but as said, it dies at the first signs of hot Texas summer weather. You may have better luck in Ohio.

Also as mentioned, oregano spreads low and very wide, but it can be managed with some scissors (or a weed whacker).

CD
Asked the wife about herb basil, her best results are sun in areas for about an hour to two. Rest in the shade. We froze heaps. Ours always dies in Autumn. Cilantro is in g house ATM, but it's due to be placed outside. I absolutely love smell of both those herbs when picked. I rub it on my hands, the smells heaven? My wife hates cilantro but will eat in in a curry or samosas. Go figure?

Russ
 
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