How do we communicate?

MypinchofItaly

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It is difficult to say, whilst I am very critical of how our government has handled the crisis, I'm not sure they have "weaponised" language in the way that, say, Trump has. The Internet has spawned alternative narratives that have not been helpful. What are your thoughts?

Right, It is difficult to have a clear and coherent idea when the load on your shoulders (as a citizen I mean) is made up of intermittent communication between fear, self-conviction, doubts, with words that if at the beginning sounded hopeful now have an accusatory tone. By this I mean that at the beginning of the pandemic in Italy, information was conscientiously guided and we were all well informed of what was happening to us, although with a few exceptions. And those exceptions, alas, have found their place in fake news, conspirators of various kinds and deniers who are still ruling and that the conscience of those who govern us should have blocked in a peremptory way in order to avoid its widespread diffusion. The second lockdown in which we find ourselves right now is completely different from the first. Information scattered, unclear and frustrated. It seems that this second wave is our fault, of us citizens. Those same citizens who have been following rules and restrictions for months. When you don't know how to deal with something, here you are looking for the scapegoat.
 
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MypinchofItaly

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I think Biden managed to say something far more convincing and useful in five minutes yesterday than Trump has managed in the whole period of the Covid crisis. Not that hard, admittedly...

And if these words are followed by deeds, even better.
 

Dive Bar Casanova

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My mom worked for Disney for decades.
Most Disney productions featured kids. A parent has to be at the studio or on location during filming by law.
Disney featured kid actors from all over the world.

In the 1940’s and ‘50’s girls under 18 wearing makeup was somewhat taboo in some areas of the country. Considered slutty.

So some Mothers strictly didn’t want any stage makeup on their girls. It’s essential for all actors in film BTW for many reasons.

My mom with her native British quick wit would tell the difficult mothers “It won’t be tart, the girls will look homely otherwise.”
“Homely was the buzzword back then” Mom said once.
Worked every time.
 

MypinchofItaly

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I'm watching right now a TV programme dedicated to the flat-earthers and I find it both funny and scary at the same time. Where do these extreme deniers come from without any scientific evidence?
Their communication is aggressive and totally closed off, they don't understand and don't want to understand but above all they can't explain. I can't stop looking at because I want to understand where they will stop. Maybe only at the first corner of the Earth.
 
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Duck59

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I used to be on a forum that had a number of wacko conspiracy theorists, including flat earthers. I asked one a few questions. What about gravity? A hoax, apparently. Okay, so how come Magellan sailed round the world and ended up where he started? A myth.

There's simply no point trying to argue with pillocks.
 

MypinchofItaly

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I would have asked “why someone should join your community?”
I think the reply would have a flat silence.

As far as I’ve seen watching that TV programme, they were almost all people with sad and problematic background life and with the strong need to feel themselves part of something and somehow “revolutionary” (at least in their flat point of view).
 
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MypinchofItaly

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I just finished a work call that freaked me out. Never seen so much looting as in this delicate moment. No, it's not about communication strategies or trying to survive the best in this days, it's about seeing the worst that some people can give of themselves when they are under stress or with something to solve. That something to solve that is part of their work skills. Teamwork. Sometimes just a shield to cover their lower cheeks.
Everyone responsible, no one responsible.
 

Wyshiepoo

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Hey - I'm just as old I think? Its just a difference of views and culture. If I met you I would respect your views and curb the swearing.

To me it's all about being a cultural chameleon.

I can eff and blind with the best of them in a pub or with the lads.

If children are around or I don't know you butter wouldn't melt in my mouth.
 

Wyshiepoo

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There are lots of different Scottish accents and one common myth is that the further north you go, the harder it is to understand. In fact, people from the Highlands tend to talk more slowly than Lowland Scots. People from Edinburgh and Glasgow often speak quite quickly and that can make it harder to decipher.

Probably the most difficult accent to get is people from rural areas like the Scottish Borders. It's true of other parts of the UK. Even I have trouble sometimes with rural Northumbrian accents.

I remember an episode of 'It'll be Alright on the Night' (for non UK readers it was an outtakes program) where one of the clips featured a Scottish fisherman. He was asked a question and his reply was this marvellous rapid fire rant that absolutely no one could understand. At a guess I'd suggest that not many Scots could understand it either.
 

Wyshiepoo

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I remember an episode of 'It'll be Alright on the Night' (for non UK readers it was an outtakes program) where one of the clips featured a Scottish fisherman. He was asked a question and his reply was this marvellous rapid fire rant that absolutely no one could understand. At a guess I'd suggest that not many Scots could understand it either.
21:40.

Not sure if he was a fisherman now or if this is a different one.

View: https://youtu.be/-Iok_VqYUKQ
 

TastyReuben

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Probably the most difficult accent to get is people from rural areas like the Scottish Borders. It's true of other parts of the UK. Even I have trouble sometimes with rural Northumbrian accents.

It's the same here. When we'd travel from Ohio to my dad's birthplace in Kentucky, the accents got thicker the deeper we went.

I remember being a teen, and we were on vacation in either Michigan or Maryland, can't remember which, and we'd stopped for the night to check into a no-tell motel type place.

I went in with my dad to see about a room, and there was a fellow in front of us trying to check in, but he had a very thick central-Kentucky accent, similar to my dad's, and the young woman at the counter couldn't understand him at all.

After a few attempts, my dad very suavely stepped up and said, "If y'all like, I can translate. I speak that language." :laugh:
 
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