Manuka Wood

CraigC

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@rascal, we found and ordered some chunks on Amazon. It is a Prime item so no shipping costs. I already have some peach wood on the way for our T-day turkey and will have to wait to use it. Any suggestions of meat, fish or fowl?
 

Morning Glory

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The only time I've come across the word 'manuka' is in relation to honey - very expensive honey. So I'm assuming this is the wood from the trees which produce the manuka blossoms from which the bees produce that honey? But I am saying this without Googling.
 

CraigC

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The only time I've come across the word 'manuka' is in relation to honey - very expensive honey. So I'm assuming this is the wood from the trees which produce the manuka blossoms from which the bees produce that honey? But I am saying this without Googling.
You'll have to wait for @rascal to answer that one. I'm not surprised that I can find this wood, since some idiot imported melaleuca into Florida at the beginning of the 20th century to "dry up" the Everglades. Millions have been spent to try and eradicate it.:mad:
 

medtran49

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The only time I've come across the word 'manuka' is in relation to honey - very expensive honey. So I'm assuming this is the wood from the trees which produce the manuka blossoms from which the bees produce that honey? But I am saying this without Googling.
Yes, the honey came up as a result on Amazon when searching for manuka wood when I ordered the wood for him this morning, so I looked at it.

I asked Craig the other day if he had ever heard of manuka wood, which I had seen when I was shopping for his peach wood. Boy have I started something :o_o:when he found out all the different types of wood he can get if this first order of peach wood is a quality product, which it should be given the reviews the company got on several BBQ forums.
 

Morning Glory

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Yes, the honey came up as a result on Amazon when searching for manuka wood when I ordered the wood for him this morning, so I looked at it.

I asked Craig the other day if he had ever heard of manuka wood, which I had seen when I was shopping for his peach wood. Boy have I started something :o_o:when he found out all the different types of wood he can get if this first order of peach wood is a quality product, which it should be given the reviews the company got on several BBQ forums.
I imagine its going to produce a delicious aroma. I think it has a particular resin in it.
 

rascal

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Manuka honey is very very expensive, I've never tried, not a honey fan. Australia are trying to get into our market so it's a bit controversial at the moment. A bit like the Chinese with our kiwi fruit.
Back to smoking, my good friend who catches eels from a local lake smokes his eel in Manuka sawdust. It's indescribable, so sweet and tasty. I have also has smoked kawhai, a local fish. It's very popular. I don't have a pic as I used the last ages ago. I'm surprised you found it on the web. Another indigenous tree here is the kauri, a law has just been passed here, no more exporting it. Good luck and keep us informed.

Russ
 
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I'm not surprised that I can find this wood, since some idiot imported melaleuca into Florida at the beginning of the 20th century to "dry up" the Everglades. Millions have been spent to try and eradicate it.:mad:
Man...Florida certain has its environmental issues, and all if it does seem to trace back to things people did. The red algae is downright scary.
 

CraigC

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Man...Florida certain has its environmental issues, and all if it does seem to trace back to things people did. The red algae is downright scary.
We have some politician made environmental issues as well. Our wonderful gov. back in the early 2000's decided to choose a handful of citrus growers over the population below Lake Okeechobee when he issued an order to destroy that populations citrus trees to protect the growers from citrus canker. Any tree within 1900 feet of an infected tree were to be destroyed. Problem was they could not tell people where that infected tree was, so they just cut peoples trees down. You couldn't buy any trees either. I LMAO in 2004 when 4 hurricanes hit Florida and spread canker all over the state. Canker effects the skin of the fruit. Almost all oranges grown in Florida are for juice. I no longer buy Florida citrus. Now there is a new one called "Citrus Greening", but a call for destroying trees of non-commercial growers has not been issued. Don't get me started on other invasive species!:mad: Hurricane Andrew was responsible for the python problem in the Everglades, not responsible keepers!
 
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rascal

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We also have imported things that back fired, gorse was bought here for cheap fencing as it grows like a bush. Long term, it's destroyed hundreds of acres of good land. I laugh when I have someone from overseas in the car with me. They see it in a paddock and always say ( gorse has a bright yellow flower) oh look at those lovely bright bushes.
It's a curse!

Russ
 

CraigC

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Our sub-tropical climate seems to be perfect for many species. The tropical fish industry has provided several invasive species in both fresh and salt water. The oscar was destroying our large mouth bass population. The solution, import their natural predator, the peacock bass. The only solution to the lionfish is to spear them. They are good eating though! Both of those problems originated with tropical fish keepers dumping them as they grew to big. Now our canals are filled with snake heads.:mad: Heck, even our native panthers aren't really native any more. They had to bring in some south American cats to bolster the dying population. They originally tried bringing in cats from out west, but they were too heavy to survive in our swamp lands.
 
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