Medical insurance and health care in your country

caseydog

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[Mod.Edit: This and the following few posts moved from another thread to form a new topic (MG)]

My work paid for it.

Russ

My "work" pays for my insurance, as in I work, and pay an insurance company more per month than my home mortgage payment (almost double). If I go into the hospital, I pay the first $3,500, plus 20-percent of the rest of the bill until I reach my "maximum out of pocket," of $8,000, which is based on how much I pay per month for my insurance.

Getting off-topic, but people in many countries probably don't know how health care works in the US.

CD
 
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My "work" pays for my insurance, as in I work, and pay an insurance company more per month than my home mortgage payment (almost double). If I go into the hospital, I pay the first $3,500, plus 20-percent of the rest of the bill until I reach my "maximum out of pocket," of $8,000, which is based on how much I pay per month for my insurance.

Getting off-topic, but people in many countries probably don't know how health care works in the US.

CD
Actually there's a fair amount in the media about how the US health service work, plus anyone who has ever travelled to the US for a holiday (hopefully!) researched how things work just in case, and to make sure their insurance coverage is sufficient.....I know I did! So I actually probably understand more about how US health care works than I do about other European countries (I know the basics in Europe, but as each country is different its more difficult to remember who does exactly what). I suppose I'm a bit more relaxed travelling in Europe because I know that whatever happens the medical care won't bankrupt me. I think in general probably we understand far more about how US healthcare works than the average American understands about the NHS.

I do have private medical coverage through work but I've never used it - the only time I've needed to see a doctor for something serious I just relied on the normal NHS system and I was seen quickly and ....and of course it didn't cost me a penny extra (apart from hospital parking charges *lol*). Hubby used it once and to be honest I couldn't see the benefit....he saw exactly the same doctors except he had a nicer waiting room in the private wing of the local hospital. I guess for elective procedures private health care may be useful to bypass waiting lists, but for urgent care the NHS almost always wins.

Back on to the topic of food.....I've never eaten hospital food, but I've visited my mother in law at mealtimes: each day she had to order from the menu for the next day (so your first day on the ward you actually get the previous person's choice!) and when they brought it around it didn't look great. She usually went for the sandwich option....I guess there's only so much they can do to a sandwich. So in summary I'd say NHS health care is top class, but the catering leaves a lot to be desired ...though I guess we go to hospital to get well, not for a meal out :p:
 

rascal

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My "work" pays for my insurance, as in I work, and pay an insurance company more per month than my home mortgage payment (almost double). If I go into the hospital, I pay the first $3,500, plus 20-percent of the rest of the bill until I reach my "maximum out of pocket," of $8,000, which is based on how much I pay per month for my insurance.

Getting off-topic, but people in many countries probably don't know how health care works in the US.

CD

That is crazy money. Id be saving it and pay as I go???

Russ
 

TastyReuben

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That is crazy money. Id be saving it and pay as I go???

Russ
You wouldn't want to chance it (well, you might, I wouldn't). It's nothing for hospital bills to reach six (and even seven) figures. My wife's stroke was something like $130,000 just for the hospital stay. Because of insurance, we paid...$900.

Keep in mind, by "hospital stay," I mean the room charge, the food, the meds, the nurses, and the supplies. That's about it. Every time a doctor stepped in to see her for 10 minutes, we got a separate bill for that. Every x-ray, every test, billed separately. Therapy while in the hospital (OT and PT)...two separate bills, and there were months of therapy after she was released. I can't even remember the final tally for the whole ordeal.

When my brother's wife died (cancer), her nine months of treatment cost several hundred thousand dollars. It's why you have to have insurance here. One good car wreck, even a chronic ongoing condition, it'll bankrupt you without insurance.
 

rascal

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You wouldn't want to chance it (well, you might, I wouldn't). It's nothing for hospital bills to reach six (and even seven) figures. My wife's stroke was something like $130,000 just for the hospital stay. Because of insurance, we paid...$900.

Keep in mind, by "hospital stay," I mean the room charge, the food, the meds, the nurses, and the supplies. That's about it. Every time a doctor stepped in to see her for 10 minutes, we got a separate bill for that. Therapy while in the hospital (OT and PT)...two separate bills, and there was months of therapy after she was released.

When my brother's wife died (cancer), her nine months of treatment cost several hundred thousand dollars. It's why you have to have insurance here. One good car wreck, even a chronic ongoing condition, it'll bankrupt you without insurance.

Our friends s.i.l was telling us last night, his cancer treatment is $120,000 a year, his cost, they hope government will fund it in next year or two?????? He's been given 5 to 8 years. Our friend who has a rental property is talking about selling it to,help them out. She enjoyed their night here last night.

Russ
 

TastyReuben

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Our friends s.i.l was telling us last night, his cancer treatment is $120,000 a year, his cost, they hope government will fund it in next year or two?????? He's been given 5 to 8 years. Our friend who has a rental property is talking about selling it to,help them out. She enjoyed their night here last night.

Russ
Yep, it's nuts. My wife's medication, without insurance, would be a couple thousand a month. A month.

I'll tell you right now, I'm 54 (just turned), and if it weren't for the cost of healthcare in this country, I'd already be retired. The only reason I'm working, and I mean the only reason, is to get employer-provided health insurance. That's pretty sad, and when I sit and think about it, it really ticks me off, because otherwise, I could be sitting around doing nothing all day, instead of working all kinds of crazy hours and getting called in the middle of the night for stupid crap all the time. 😡
 

rascal

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Yep, it's nuts. My wife's medication, without insurance, would be a couple thousand a month. A month.

I'll tell you right now, I'm 54 (just turned), and if it weren't for the cost of healthcare in this country, I'd already be retired. The only reason I'm working, and I mean the only reason, is to get employer-provided health insurance. That's pretty sad, and when I sit and think about it, it really ticks me off, because otherwise, I could be sitting around doing nothing all day, instead of working all kinds of crazy hours and getting called in the middle of the night for stupid crap all the time. 😡

I always said I'd retire at 60. Here we get superannuation when you turn 65, about 300 a week. I pretty much retired at 61. My life is pretty cruisy, keep good health and I don't have insurance now. Still work part time and casually.

Russ
 

TastyReuben

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I always said I'd retire at 60. Here we get superannuation when you turn 65, about 300 a week. I pretty much retired at 61. My life is pretty cruisy, keep good health and I don't have insurance now. Still work part time and casually.

Russ
Apart from having a natural aversion to work (😬), my dad retired comfortably at 59. I don't want to do worse than my old man! :)
 

caseydog

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That is crazy money. Id be saving it and pay as I go???

Russ

Another thing about US healthcare. If you have insurance, the insurance company has contracts with the hospitals, and they tell the hospitals how much they are going to get paid. If you don't have insurance, the hospital charges "full-retail." So, when the hospital sends a bill for $10,000 to your insurance company, the insurance company tells them, we are going to pay you $2,000, and the insured person owes you $500. No negotiations. This is what you get.

The insurance company sends the insured person a statement that says, this is what you owe the hospital. The hospital sends the insured person a bill for $500.

If you don't have insurance, the hospital sends you a bill for $10,000, and tell you where to mail the check.

CD
 

rascal

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Another thing about US healthcare. If you have insurance, the insurance company has contracts with the hospitals, and they tell the hospitals how much they are going to get paid. If you don't have insurance, the hospital charges "full-retail." So, when the hospital sends a bill for $10,000 to your insurance company, the insurance company tells them, we are going to pay you $2,000, and the insured person owes you $500. No negotiations. This is what you get.

The insurance company sends the insured person a statement that says, this is what you owe the hospital. The hospital sends the insured person a bill for $500.

If you don't have insurance, the hospital sends you a bill for $10,000, and tell you where to mail the check.

CD

I had wife and kids covered since 91, about 2000 wife had double hip replacement, woman's inner stuff op, thyroid stuff, son had a hip replacement then daughter had hip as well. And I claimed virtually nil. No excess or anything. Nada. I think from memory monthly account was $500 for two families.
Wife's family have hip problems. I don't.

Russ
 

Burt Blank

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I had my heart attack whilst preparing Christmas lunch. It was quite bad so they took me by ambulance to the regional specialist heart hospital Broadgreen Liverpool. I was in theater for the afternoon so I missed the Queens speech and the annual showing of the Great Escape. I woke up in my room connected to all-sorts of beepy things. Broadgreen spends more money on food than any other NHS hospital then. I had to watch my younger brother demolish a large platter of food from the buffet lunch. It included Bagels, smoked salmon and cream cheese.
The NHS, I can only say I had wonderful treatment throughout my life.
As a British pensioner who's wife is younger (she is counted as my dependent ) all our medical costs are sent directly to the UK for payment. I also receive in December £ 200 winter fuel allowance and a £10 Christmas present. My Doctor here is the beautiful blond 6 ft tall 30 years old Tina. She gave me a full examination when I signed up. The prostrate check was the highlight.
 

CraigC

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I’m a bit surprised to hear that the hospital did not offer fresh fruit or veg, I’ve always thought it’s one of those things that are allowed as first thing. regardless the country. I have never been hospitalised except for a night because of a car accident occurred to me - so no direct personal experience in food hospital - but my mom has been a nurse for 30 years old (she is now retired) and she said that fresh fruit is definitely allowed. Then my brother has been hospitalised several times and he experienced HF.. and apart from fresh fruit, he still has nightmares about the rest, remembering how bread tasted like plastic tray

I understand that health care is free in Italy, but the family is responsible for bedding, personal hygiene and meals. Only the actual treatment is free. Is this true?
 
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