Seasoning Pies

Hacienda71

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I made some beef pies the other day. The filling was made from mincemeat thyme, mustard, beef jelly and seasoned. The pastry was lovely, but the pies were let down by the filling being under-seasoned. Is there a way to calculate the level of seasoning required if you can't taste the mixture because you are using raw meat, or is it trial error and experience?
 
It's not very scientific, but I always add about twice as much seasoning as I think I'll need, and my pies turn out just fine. I always include Worcestershire Sauce with almost all my savoury cooking - I find that helps to give a kick of flavour, and you don't need too much. Also, I find freshly ground pepper gives more flavour, so I always use a pepper mill.
 
I always cook any meat that is to go into a pie, meat can be unpredictable either fall apart tender or tough as old boots, usually casserole it first, thicken the gravy, drain it into a saucepan and serve it with the pie
 
I always cook any meat that is to go into a pie, meat can be unpredictable either fall apart tender or tough as old boots, usually casserole it first, thicken the gravy, drain it into a saucepan and serve it with the pie
I tend to do the same, but otherwise I simply make a few grinds of the salt cellar and pepper mill between layers of the meat or veg.
 
True cooking meat before gives personal consistency but a true Cornish pasty cooked from scratch in its pastry case is a delicacy if done with love and care,normally a bit peppery ,the veg still holding its shape ,tender meat :hungry:
 
True cooking meat before gives personal consistency but a true Cornish pasty cooked from scratch in its pastry case is a delicacy if done with love and care,normally a bit peppery ,the veg still holding its shape ,tender meat :hungry:
Wonderful stuff. I always use white pepper for Cornish pasty and skirt beef cut across the grain. White pepper is an underused condiment these days. Its all Delia's fault! It has its place and tastes quite different from black pepper. I very often use it in mashed potato or in creamy sauces.
 
Wonderful stuff. I always use white pepper for Cornish pasty and skirt beef cut across the grain. White pepper is an underused condiment these days. Its all Delia's fault! It has its place and tastes quite different from black pepper. I very often use it in mashed potato or in creamy sauces.
I use ground white pepper ,cracked pepper ,and ground black pepper all the time ,they all have their uses ,to many to list ,but if you are looking for creamy pomme purre you wouldn't want dark specks of bleeding cracked black pepper in it ,same as a silky leek and potato soup seasoned with white pepper it's just used
Also love pink peppered corns,green ones have their place ,can be a little more hot
 
I use ground white pepper ,cracked pepper ,and ground black pepper all the time ,they all have their uses ,to many to list ,but if you are looking for creamy pomme purre you wouldn't want dark specks of bleeding cracked black pepper in it ,same as a silky leek and potato soup seasoned with white pepper it's just used
Also love pink peppered corns,green ones have their place ,can be a little more hot

Pink peppercorns are great. I used some in a curry recently. They aren't really Indian (I think) but I was trying to make a hot curry without too much chilli. They worked really well. I dry fried them first, then ground with the other spices. Have you tried long pepper? I discovered this a while back, It really is a long shaped pepper! It's musky and hot, but in a much more subtle way than black pepper. It has sweet notes too, almost like cinnamon. Very complex.

Long_Pepper.jpg
 
Pink peppercorns are great. I used some in a curry recently. They aren't really Indian (I think) but I was trying to make a hot curry without too much chilli. They worked really well. I dry fried them first, then ground with the other spices. Have you tried long pepper? I discovered this a while back, It really is a long shaped pepper! It's musky and hot, but in a much more subtle way than black pepper. It has sweet notes too, almost like cinnamon. Very complex.

View attachment 1275
Today's fact Pink Pepper corns are not actually a peppercorn they are from the same family as a cashew,two points in a pub quiz circa late 80s
I use them in fish dishes a lot and if I'm making a ketchup
The long pepper ,I have not used them but I'm sure I have some on the shelf, I have a friend who's a buyer for a large super market chain,never turn down samples ,have a look at the health positives on them!
 
Today's fact Pink Pepper corns are not actually a peppercorn they are from the same family as a cashew,two points in a pub quiz circa late 80s

That's odd. I thought they were berries. A quick check on wiki says we are both right. They are berries from the cashew family of plants (which also includes mango and poison ivy!).
Cashews aren't nuts but seeds from the same family. And how strange they look! :

cashew.jpg
 
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