Today's Bread

Do you make your own bread?


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flyinglentris

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These are all listed at "light rye bread" at their respective sites. That third one is local to me (Klostermans).
You can also buy light rye flour.

Those are much lighter than the Rye Breads I have known.
 

TastyReuben

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I made an English Muffin Toasting Loaf today.

The taste and texture are fine, but I'm trying to work out how to best use that giant clay baker I got for Christmas.

This is a 5-cups of flour recipe, and it's a very wet dough (more like a batter), and I think the clay baker is just too big - it behaved more like baking in a cake pan.

Either way, half will be our toast for the next few days, and half will go in the freezer.

54731
 

Burt Blank

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I made an English Muffin Toasting Loaf today.

The taste and texture are fine, but I'm trying to work out how to best use that giant clay baker I got for Christmas.

This is a 5-cups of flour recipe, and it's a very wet dough (more like a batter), and I think the clay baker is just too big - it behaved more like baking in a cake pan.

Either way, half will be our toast for the next few days, and half will go in the freezer.

View attachment 54731
Did you bake the loaf with the fan on mate ?
 

MrsDangermouse

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Not sure what that is (not something we get in the UK), so I'm not sure how its supposed to look. Its made with baking powder rather than yeast?
I had to Google it and it does seem to a "thing" because there were loads of results - eg. this one which has both yeast and baking soda (bicarb, rather than baking powder - I expect you already know, but in case anyone else doesn't :wink: ) in it....so I'd assume the texture is somewhere between ordinary and soda bread? I can't work out where the "English" in the name comes from though...I've never seen anything like it over here.
 

TastyReuben

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Did you bake the loaf with the fan on mate ?
No. I used the fan on my oven once and didn't see any difference, and it the oven manual, it recommends leaving the fan off for breads, but I'd give it a go.

In this case, it's just down to the recipe and the baking vessel not being in agreement. I'm in the process of working out how to use that big clay baker I got, and a 5-cup recipe goes in there more like a brownie mix. I think 7-8 cups will be ideal.

Not sure what that is (not something we get in the UK), so I'm not sure how its supposed to look. Its made with baking powder rather than yeast?
It's meant to replicate the texture of an (American) English muffin, in bread form.

It should look, as far as shape goes, like a loaf of sandwich bread. It's a very wet batter-like dough, and the wide pan I used allowed it to spread out too much. It's made with yeast and baking soda.

(American) English Muffin
54796



(American) English Muffin Toasting Bread:
54798
 

MrsDangermouse

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No. I used the fan on my oven once and didn't see any difference, and it the oven manual, it recommends leaving the fan off for breads, but I'd give it a go.

In this case, it's just down to the recipe and the baking vessel not being in agreement. I'm in the process of working out how to use that big clay baker I got, and a 5-cup recipe goes in there more like a brownie mix. I think 7-8 cups will be ideal.


It's meant to replicate the texture of an (American) English muffin, in bread form.

It should look, as far as shape goes, like a loaf of sandwich bread. It's a very wet batter-like dough, and the wide pan I used allowed it to spread out too much. It's made with yeast and baking soda.

(American) English Muffin
View attachment 54796

You split your muffins open before toasting it? I can honestly say I've never seen that before :unsure: I don't know if this is another UK/US thing, or maybe its just my family are strange...but we always toast ours whole and then split them afterwards so the inside stays nice and soft and fluffy.

I might have to buy some now and try them both ways to see which I prefer.
 

caseydog

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You split your muffins open before toasting it? I can honestly say I've never seen that before :unsure: I don't know if this is another UK/US thing, or maybe its just my family are strange...but we always toast ours whole and then split them afterwards so the inside stays nice and soft and fluffy.

I might have to buy some now and try them both ways to see which I prefer.

We slit them so the peaks of the bread inside get browned, and crispy. The "English" muffins we have here feel a little doughy inside if not toasted. I think that is done intentionally in baking them to make them ideal for toasting.

CD
 
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