Today's Bread

Do you make your own bread?


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MypinchofItaly

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No cycling today because of the bad weather - I decided to call this a 'Rainy Day Bread'.

600g of flour to make two loaves - 65% strong white, 25% spelt (definitely Triticum Spelta) and 10% sarrasin (buckwheat flour).

Cut (approximately) into two at knock down. In the oven for 25 mins at 210C.

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I like both the bread and its name, very fancy

With “strong white” flour you mean all-purpose flour?
 

Wandering Bob

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I like both the bread and its name, very fancy

With “strong white” flour you mean all-purpose flour?
Thank you.

No, not all-purpose flour. "Strong White Bread flour" - it's a flour marketed in the UK specifically for bread-making. It's the closest term I could come up with for the mixture of two French bread flours that I used today - Farine Pain Maison sold by Francine, and an organic T-80 wheat flour (demi-complète) sold by Jardin Bio.
 

Wandering Bob

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Another 'Biking & Baking' day today.

After a fairly cold and quick 90 minutes on the bike, I made a 'focaccia con formaggio'.

Similar to the one posted three days ago, but I swapped out 70g of the Strong White bread flour and replaced it with 70g of the spiffing new Triticum Spelta flour that I was given a couple of nights ago.

The top is decorated with shavings of Ossau Iraty cheese (a sheep's cheese from the Basque region).

I also wanted to use some rosemary but my bush is in flower at the moment, and I was told never to cut sprigs when the bush is in flower. So that'll have to wait a while, unless I can find some not in flower.

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MypinchofItaly

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Another 'Biking & Baking' day today.

After a fairly cold and quick 90 minutes on the bike, I made a 'focaccia con formaggio'.

Similar to the one posted three days ago, but I swapped out 70g of the Strong White bread flour and replaced it with 70g of the spiffing new Triticum Spelta flour that I was given a couple of nights ago.

The top is decorated with shavings of Ossau Iraty cheese (a sheep's cheese from the Basque region).

I also wanted to use some rosemary but my bush is in flower at the moment, and I was told never to cut sprigs when the bush is in flower. So that'll have to wait a while, unless I can find some not in flower.

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Looks great, congrats!

It seems that a sunflower has popped out on top of your focaccia
 

TastyReuben

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I'm not calling this a baking disaster for a couple of reasons.

First, it's a mid-19th century bread recipe, updated in the 1960's, and god knows what got lost in the translations. Not only that, I can't find any other references for this particular recipe name, so I'm not even sure exactly how it's supposed to turn out.

Second, while making it, I kept thinking, "This isn't going to work very well," because the dough was very, very wet, like a quick bread, even though it's a yeast bread, and as it rose, it was very bubbly and holey - I've seen that enough to know it'll likely collapse...and it did.

The instructions also said to mix for only one minute, which is no amount of time to build any structure.

Third, it tastes pretty good. It's about halfway between a modern sandwich bread and something like an oatmeal muffin. I wouldn't make a sandwich with it, but it's good. It's very moist and spongy.

One other interesting thing, no second proofing, no shaping. I mixed it up and poured it (yes, it poured) directly into the loaf pan.

So, without further discussion, Federal Bread, from antebellum America.

 

morning glory

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First, it's a mid-19th century bread recipe, updated in the 1960's, and god knows what got lost in the translations. Not only that, I can't find any other references for this particular recipe name, so I'm not even sure exactly how it's supposed to turn out.

Second, while making it, I kept thinking, "This isn't going to work very well," because the dough was very, very wet, like a quick bread, even though it's a yeast bread, and as it rose, it was very bubbly and holey - I've seen that enough to know it'll likely collapse...and it d
Fascinated - can you indicate the the ingredients or post the recipe?
 

medtran49

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I think a lot of older recipes assume you know how to cook at least somewhat and what you are doing. I have a very old cookbook, older than me, from my mother and quite a few of the recipes aren't complete, and this is supposed to be a book for a new bride. If you didn't have some knowledge of cooking already, a lot of them would be disasterous.
 

TastyReuben

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I think a lot of older recipes assume you know how to cook at least somewhat and what you are doing. I have a very old cookbook, older than me, from my mother and quite a few of the recipes aren't complete, and this is supposed to be a book for a new bride. If you didn't have some knowledge of cooking already, a lot of them would be disasterous.
I know. I like instructions like "cook in a medium oven until done" and "place a good amount of butter into some flour and add enough milk to make a stiff dough." :)
 

The Late Night Gourmet

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I'm back Mr. Gourmet .. thank you for your comments.

I spent just about every waking moment on my bike last year (8311 kilometres cycled).

This year may be the same (target 9000km), but I'll try and find time to read posts on here, and to post a few things of my own too.
I'm glad you've returned, and I'm so everyone else is, too. All that bike riding should burn off just enough calories for all the bread you've been making. :laugh:
 

Wandering Bob

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Brendan’s Bread – named after Storm Brendan which has been battering my house for the last two days and which seems to have dropped about half the Atlantic Ocean onto our village.

Four different flours used .. 260g of a multi-cereal flour, containing sunflower and lin seeds (and an unspecified proportion of rye flour); 140g of an organic T-80 flour (sold by Paysans d’ici); 140g of farine d’épeautre (Triticum Spelta) and 60g of sarrasin (buckwheat) flour.

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MypinchofItaly

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Brendan’s Bread – named after Storm Brendan which has been battering my house for the last two days and which seems to have dropped about half the Atlantic Ocean onto our village.

Four different flours used .. 260g of a multi-cereal flour, containing sunflower and lin seeds (and an unspecified proportion of rye flour); 140g of an organic T-80 flour (sold by Paysans d’ici); 140g of farine d’épeautre (Triticum Spelta) and 60g of sarrasin (buckwheat) flour.

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A bread (looks delicious) named like a storm... haha, brilliant.
 
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