What expats miss abroad

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This article talks about the foods expats miss while abroad, but it doesn't mention any of the things we cram the car or motor home with when we head back from the UK. For us it's Vimto cordial, Oxo cubes, Ovaltine, smoked back bacon, mature Cheddar cheese and Anchor butter. We can get them here - at a price - but we always bring back a good supply with us.

I know there are probably no expats here, but what do you always take with you when you go abroad on holiday? What can't you do without, even for a week or two? (I suspect Arch may say 'noodles') :roflmao:
 
We have no need to go back to the UK (at the moment), no relations to speak of, so people bring us stuff over. Limited only to porridge oats and baked beans (1.40€ a can here)

If there was no one coming over, we wouldn't miss them. Can't say either of us have a must have food, although my wife might have a problem living somewhere where strawberries were unobtainable :cry:
 
For years I had to take Twiglets over to Ireland for a mate - you can't get them over there.
Fortunately he can now get them mail order from Amazon.
I'm not sure what was worse - trimming my luggage to the minimum to fit more Twiglets in, or everyone in my local shop assuming that I love Twiglets, as I was buying 24 bags.
I feckin' HATE Twiglets.
 
This article talks about the foods expats miss while abroad, but it doesn't mention any of the things we cram the car or motor home with when we head back from the UK. For us it's Vimto cordial, Oxo cubes, Ovaltine, smoked back bacon, mature Cheddar cheese and Anchor butter. We can get them here - at a price - but we always bring back a good supply with us.

I know there are probably no expats here, but what do you always take with you when you go abroad on holiday? What can't you do without, even for a week or two? (I suspect Arch may say 'noodles') :roflmao:

:p:

Bizarrely, I can, and have, lived without noodles for weeks when in France.

I think I'd struggle without proper Tea. By which I don't mean fancy tea, just tea made properly with boiling water and milk etc. When cycling in France, it's always been wonderful to arrive at our friends' house, and get a proper cuppa!
 
I think I'd struggle without proper Tea. By which I don't mean fancy tea, just tea made properly with boiling water and milk etc. When cycling in France, it's always been wonderful to arrive at our friends' house, and get a proper cuppa!

I think people who like tea have a definite problem in France, as the French don't have a clue.
We have friends who visit who drink up to 6/7 cups mugs a day and bring their own with them
I don't have a problem though - I don't like tea :)
 
:p:

Bizarrely, I can, and have, lived without noodles for weeks when in France.

I think I'd struggle without proper Tea. By which I don't mean fancy tea, just tea made properly with boiling water and milk etc. When cycling in France, it's always been wonderful to arrive at our friends' house, and get a proper cuppa!

I do think a good brew is a problem, we have travelled a bit and have yet to have a decent cuppa.
 
I do think a good brew is a problem, we have travelled a bit and have yet to have a decent cuppa.

The funny thing is that even in the countries that we associate with tea (China, India etc), they do it differently to us. There is nothing like a British cup of tea, even a badly made one is special when you can't get one at all!
 
Some timw back we watched a programme about Brits who have moved to Australia, 1 couple have started a business importing 'British' food and drink which cannot be bought over in Oz. Great idea, i hope it all works out for them.
 
Some timw back we watched a programme about Brits who have moved to Australia, 1 couple have started a business importing 'British' food and drink which cannot be bought over in Oz. Great idea, i hope it all works out for them.

There is a British shop in a town near to me, I think it's been there for a few years now. Our local supermarkets have foreign food sections which contain a small selection of British food, but it is rather strange - Carrs Water Biscuits, Heinz Baked Beans, Golden Syrup and a few other 'oddities'. I often wonder who suggested what to buy.:)
 
There is a British shop in a town near to me, I think it's been there for a few years now. Our local supermarkets have foreign food sections which contain a small selection of British food, but it is rather strange - Carrs Water Biscuits, Heinz Baked Beans, Golden Syrup and a few other 'oddities'. I often wonder who suggested what to buy.:)

When we got married we were out of England for a month, we married in Fiji then moved on to Sydney then Cairns, a fantastic time and great food. When we got back the first meal we wanted was beef stew and dumplings
 
When we got married we were out of England for a month, we married in Fiji then moved on to Sydney then Cairns, a fantastic time and great food. When we got back the first meal we wanted was beef stew and dumplings

that reminded me - Fray Bentos Steak and Kidney Pies in tins - I didn't still think you copuld buy them :scratchhead:
 
Polos. we missed them something chronic whilst we were out of the UK for 12 months on tour. My mother somewhat infamously brought us 36 packets of them (we had asked for 12) when she came to visit us when we arrived in Nordkapp, Norway. We then had to cycle with them until they were eaten!

On Rhodes, where we had 6 weeks over the Christmas period waiting for the really bad weather in Turkey to clear, we found a supermarket that stocked of all things Waitrose own brand products and that was like heaven to us - we were really missing Waitrose's cheapest tomatoe pesto (think £1.39 a jar). Don't ask. We have no idea.

now, we miss though wonderful olives and oranges along with decent olive oil soap! strange buggers we are!
 
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