What is the Most Common Mistake You Make.

Shermie

Guru
Joined
21 Aug 2014
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
5,301
Location
Brighton, MA.
When grinding meat, it's always desirable to have everything cold. I like to have the meat partly frozen during the grind, since this results in the best quality product. If the meat is too warm, there'll be "smearing". The image on the left shows what happens when the meat it too warm during the grind:

20110401-burger-lab-grinding-01.jpg


The fat isn't integrated well, and it will separate more easily during cooking, resulting in dry meat without the flavor you expect from properly ground meat (as shown by the image on the right). Cold is the friend of meat grinding.

The reason I freeze every component that contacts the meat is to keep the meat cold. The friction created by grinding warms up the meat somewhat, but not enough to cause smearing, as long as you have a good meat grinder and frozen meat at the start. A room-temperature grinder will warm up the meat faster, so I freeze all the labeled items; the body of the grinder - which doesn't touch the meat, and which contains the drive motor - should never be frozen.

Standalone-Electric-Food-Grinder-Parts1.jpg



Also, when you're slicing raw meat almost paper-thin, such as for pepper steak subs, it is also best to have it partially frozen, so that it doesn't tear. :wink:
 
Last edited:

Yorky

Uncomfortably numb
Joined
3 Oct 2016
Local time
10:16 AM
Messages
11,555
Location
Nakhorn Nowhere, N. E. Thailand.
Website
freebeerforyorky.com
When I used to mince (grind) my own beef I would buy rump in one lump (about 2 - 3 kg) then trim and cube it, pop it in the freezer for about 30 - 40 minutes then through the mincer. Because I had only a small table top mincer and our main supermarket stopped selling beef (for an unknown reason) I started buying beef already minced from my western food supplier.
 

Shermie

Guru
Joined
21 Aug 2014
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
5,301
Location
Brighton, MA.
In the food processor, I give the meat about 8 to 10 short pulses to properly chop the meat.
it gives it uniform texture to make it look as though the butcher did it!! :wink:
 

CraigC

Veteran
Joined
1 Dec 2017
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
4,016
Location
SE Florida
It is imperative when grinding meat and stuffing sausages that everything be cold! Especially when doing 20+ pounds. We do it in batches. I'll clean and put the grinder components back in the freezer between batches.
 

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Recipe Challenge Judge
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
3:16 AM
Messages
38,954
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
Or I have two shopping lists - the second one created because I'd forgotten that I'd already started a list. Then only taking one of the lists shopping, and coming home with only half of what I needed.
I've done the same!

And when I'm 'playing' in the kitchen I often forget to note down quantities of ingredients that I've used - and I end up producing something really worthwhile but with little chance of replicating it.

You may find (as I and some other members here have) that being on the forum encourages you to write quantities down as you go - so you can post the recipes here!. I now do it religiously. A pen and paper is always in the kitchen.... comme ça - which will get typed up later today:

fullsizeoutput_3697.jpeg
 

Yorky

Uncomfortably numb
Joined
3 Oct 2016
Local time
10:16 AM
Messages
11,555
Location
Nakhorn Nowhere, N. E. Thailand.
Website
freebeerforyorky.com
My wife is usually very good with my shopping lists. Occasionally I have to explain some of the English but not often. However, on the list today was "tomatoes (5)". She returned with three. I asked why she'd only bought 3 when I asked for 5 - she answered that there are 3 in the fridge already. I knew that but I wanted 8!

Oh well.
 
Joined
30 Mar 2017
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
4,008
Location
Detroit, USA
Website
absolute0cooking.com
Ha...I just realized the REAL mistake I make the most often:

Over Complicate The Recipe

I didn't even think of it because making a recipe complex is how I instinctively think all recipes are supposed to be. Just add salt and pepper? That's far too simple! No, seriously, there are things where that's all I add (like seasoning steak and burgers). But, just about anything else, I want so many layers of flavor that things do sometimes get muddled. I realize later on that I didn't add to the dish, but actually subtracted by not letting the ingredients shine on their own. And, yes, I'll probably do this again.

I'm thinking of this after making a salsa verde from canned tomatillos and canned corn (with fresh onion, cilantro, and serrano pepper). I saw these at the Kroger bargain bin for 89 cents each. I wanted to see if I could make something that's as good as what I prepare from scratch, but with minimal effort. It was fantastic.

I will probably make my next salsa the way I normally do (using fresh ingredients that I grill first). But, this was a nice surprise, and it required virtually no effort. Something to keep in mind for next time!
 

Wandering Bob

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 Jul 2018
Local time
4:16 AM
Messages
873
Location
France
Ha...I just realized the REAL mistake I make the most often:

Over Complicate The Recipe

I didn't even think of it because making a recipe complex is how I instinctively think all recipes are supposed to be. Just add salt and pepper? That's far too simple! No, seriously, there are things where that's all I add (like seasoning steak and burgers). But, just about anything else, I want so many layers of flavor that things do sometimes get muddled. I realize later on that I didn't add to the dish, but actually subtracted by not letting the ingredients shine on their own. And, yes, I'll probably do this again.

I completely understand what you mean but at the same time I find it hard to term this a 'mistake'. It's what we all do, isn't it? and sure, sometimes it doesn't work - but when it does, and you've created a new dish or flavour combination, then it more than repays the time spent (or wasted) going down a culinary 'dead-end'.

If it's a mistake to 'over complicate' then I'm happy to keep making mistakes !
 
Joined
30 Mar 2017
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
4,008
Location
Detroit, USA
Website
absolute0cooking.com
I completely understand what you mean but at the same time I find it hard to term this a 'mistake'. It's what we all do, isn't it? and sure, sometimes it doesn't work - but when it does, and you've created a new dish or flavour combination, then it more than repays the time spent (or wasted) going down a culinary 'dead-end'.

If it's a mistake to 'over complicate' then I'm happy to keep making mistakes !
The fact that it's so much a part of my normal cooking process is why I didn't think of it originally! :laugh: And, as you say, experimentation can yield unexpected great things. I think part of my reason for posting that is because I want to become more thoughtful with what I do in the kitchen...I think, if I state it publicly, it might remind me to try it the next time I make something! :)
 

oddduck

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 May 2018
Local time
10:16 PM
Messages
536
Location
Usa
Mine is a stupid basic mistake but i do it all the time...i forget to turn on the burner...so i put the pot on the stove to boil water and go do some stuff waiting for the pot to boil and come back when i think it should be at a good hard boil to find a placid pot of water sitting on a cold burner.
 
Top Bottom