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JAS_OH1

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Sorry, of course - I think the origin is Scottish. It also has a slang connotation...
Yeah, I figured it wasn't this:
86London%20UK%20-%20baps-org%20hero.jpg

BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir
Pramukh Swami Road
Neasden, London NW10 8HW UK

I am hoping no one ever refers to any part of my anatomy as "baps", LOL.
 

Morning Glory

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Not that I'm British, but I'd say "bum" would be the closest UK equivalent.

That's just what we usually call it - either that or bottom or 'bot'. Its a term we use quite normally and its not considered at all 'risqué. Also in the medical profession that is sometimes used I think. I've had ambulance medics saying to me 'can you shuffle your bum across onto this stretcher?'
 

The Velvet Curtain

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As you say - not really. TBH I've not really heard the slang version of baps use here either (for another part of the anatomy).
If you were male you would hear the word baps quite often. We tend not to use it in front of women because we find they are generally not impressed. :whistling:
 

SatNavSaysStraightOn

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Gravel I know, but never heard baps before.
I was brought up knowing them as baps yet my husband who was brought up around about an hour's drive away knows them as muffins (a very regional thing to Greater Manchester area). Down the road where one of is brothers lives, they are Barm cakes.
I also know them as stotties (though they tend to be larger) and as buns, cobs & barm cakes as well.
Batch is the only one I haven't came across myself.

Cobs, buns, baps or barm cakes: what do people call bread rolls? | YouGov

When is a bread roll not a bread roll? When you’re in the North East, North West and parts of the Midlands, according to new data from YouGov Profiles.
Bread roll / Roll – name most commonly used by 52% of English people
By far the most commonly used term, and the only one that is well-represented across the whole country. A slim majority of all English people (52%) say this is the name they use most often, with this figure being much higher in the counties that make up the South of England.
Bun – name most commonly used by 10% of English people
Bun is a favoured name in the North East, with the majority of people in the counties of Durham, Tyne and Wear and Northumberland being most likely to use this term. Noticeable minorities in North Yorkshire (in the 30-39% bracket) and Cumbria (in the 20-29% group) also use the term, as well as smaller minorities (in the 10-19% range) in Lincolnshire, Merseyside and East Riding of Yorkshire.
Cob – name most commonly used by 8% of English people
The term cob is particularly popular in some sections of the Midlands, with it being the preferred term among a majority of people in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, as well as smaller minorities in the West Midlands metropolitan county (in the 20-29% bracket), Staffordshire and Worcestershire (in the 10-19% range).
Barm cake / Barm – name most commonly used by 6% of English people
The most commonly used term in Greater Manchester, although because there is such a diversity of names used in Manchester this only amounts to between 30-39% of Mancunians. The name is also relatively popular in Lancashire (in the 30-39% group) and Merseyside (in the 20-29% range), where it ties for first place with bread roll. The term also falls into the 20-29% bracket in Cheshire also it is not the most popular option here.
Bap – name most commonly used by 6% of English people
While not the most popular term in any county, there are nonetheless notable minorities of people (in the 20-29% group) using the name bap in Staffordshire, Cheshire, and Shropshire – where it is the second or joint-second most common term – as well as smaller minorities (in the 10-19% range) in Cornwall, Devon and the West Midlands metropolitan county.
Other names – most commonly used by 12% of English people
Muffin (3%) – a term almost exclusively used in Greater Manchester (in the 20-29% bracket), where it is about as commonly used as bread roll / roll.
Tea cake (4%) – the second most popular term in West Yorkshire (in the 30-39% group), with smaller minorities (10-19%) using the term in Lancashire and Cumbria.
Batch (2%) – the second most popular term in Warwickshire (in the 20-29% range), with a small minority of people in Merseyside (10-19%) also using the term.
Other, other names (3%) – the list used by YouGov was by no means exhaustive and 20-29% of people in East Riding of Yorkshire and South Yorkshire answered “something else” when asked what name they most commonly used. Previous research from other sources indicates that potential candidates here could be “bread cake” and/or “scuffler” among others.
 

JAS_OH1

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Not that I'm British, but I'd say "bum" would be the closest UK equivalent.
Yeah, I have watched enough British television and read enough "English" novels to know about bums. But it just doesn't have quite the same ring to it (in my Murican opinion).
 
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