What your significant other does with food and drink that annoys you?

TastyReuben

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She cuts everything into bite size pieces before eating. Pancakes, French toast, steak, chicken, you name it. The only exceptions are sandwiches and soups/stew.

I'm the opposite. I like big food cut as the meal progresses I guess.
MrsT's grandmother was something of a society gal back in the 1920's or whenever, the kind who went to finishing school, had a coming out party, all that stuff.

She was a stickler for table manners, once cutting me down for using my soup spoon incorrectly (the spoon should be filled by pushing it away from you, not toward you 🤷🏻‍♂️), and she also corrected another nephew-in-law for cutting all of his steak up first, instead of cutting it one piece at a time. She said the only time that was appropriate was when cutting food for a small child. :laugh:

So many rules!
 

Mountain Cat

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I don't currently have a significant other - and when I did there wasn't anything that stood out.

However - housemates:
1) the woman who would come home from classes at 1 am or so , put a chicken in the oven, turn it on BROIL, go take a "nap" and the rest of us would come home at 5 pm-ish to burning chicken in the oven. Wasn't just once. I think I mentioned this before on another thread. At the end of the semester since I was the last one to depart I got stiffed with the bill to replace the range.

2) For a long while, after over-eating peanut butter sandwiches as a child, I could not stand even the stench of the stuff. Housemate in the 90s would eat peanut butter, then take the knife he used to spread it, and toss it into hot water in the sink without cleaning it. Hot water plus the stench magnified, and I wanted to toss my cookies when I came into the kitchen later. He did this more than once, too, even after I begged him not to do so.

3) Double dipping. Dad did that a lot as he got more and more into late stage dementia. I held my peace because he was at a stage where he could no longer help it - so I found myself taking what I thought I might want at a first and final helping from any dish He'd ignore the serving spoon/forks, or else he'd eat directly from them. And as the meal progressed he'd say, "Don't you want more?"

No. Not now.
 

Morning Glory

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She grabbed her half, took two bites, and now it's sitting on her side table, where it'll sit for the rest of the day. She wants only things other people already have. Had I not heated that up at all and just made a peanut butter sandwich, that spaghetti would have sat in there for another week. 🤷🏻‍♂️

How you put up with this I don't know. It must be love! 💘
 

JAS_OH1

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MrsT's grandmother was something of a society gal back in the 1920's or whenever, the kind who went to finishing school, had a coming out party, all that stuff.

She was a stickler for table manners, once cutting me down for using my soup spoon incorrectly (the spoon should be filled by pushing it away from you, not toward you 🤷🏻‍♂️), and she also corrected another nephew-in-law for cutting all of his steak up first, instead of cutting it one piece at a time. She said the only time that was appropriate was when cutting food for a small child. :laugh:

So many rules!
I wonder what she would think of my husband when he picks up his soup bowl at the end and drinks the last of the broth from the bowl :laugh:And I have been eating my soup wrong for decades. Thank goodness I don't order soup when I go out to eat so no one has noticed my barbaric table manners!

I think the reason I never cut my steak up before eating it is not only because it cools faster, but it also dries out faster, plus if one doesn't finish the entire steak, it's better to heat a whole piece of steak rather than multiple small pieces, which again, would dry it out and most certainly overcook the meat upon reheat.
 

caseydog

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Antifreeze is reputed to be quite tasty, very sweet (not kidding), it's why you have to watch your pets around any leaky car radiators.

That's another one you can chalk up to my dog and her nine lives (sorry, cats). She got into some antifreeze and had to go through the very-expensive-and-doesn't-always-work anti-antifreeze treatment (liquid charcoal forced down the gullet to neutralize the poison). She lived to tell the tale, though.

Dogs like all kinds of things people wouldn't eat or drink.

I had the missfortune pf tasting anti-freeze once. Not intentionally -- it involved my dad working on a car. It does have a sweetness to it, but it is, nonetheless, nasty.

CD
 

caseydog

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MrsT's grandmother was something of a society gal back in the 1920's or whenever, the kind who went to finishing school, had a coming out party, all that stuff.

She was a stickler for table manners, once cutting me down for using my soup spoon incorrectly (the spoon should be filled by pushing it away from you, not toward you 🤷🏻‍♂️), and she also corrected another nephew-in-law for cutting all of his steak up first, instead of cutting it one piece at a time. She said the only time that was appropriate was when cutting food for a small child. :laugh:

So many rules!

Yeah, but she was right about those things.

When my dad really started to move up the corporate ladder, I was in college, and we started going to some really high-end restaurants. I took it upon myself to learn what every plate, utensil and glass on the table was for, and how to eat and drink like a proper gentleman.

The soup spoon thing is hard to get used to. It is not a natural movement.

I also leaned how to order wine, with the help of a sommelier, when you really don't know a lot about wine. Once you realize the sommelier is there to help you, not critique you, it is an easy experience.

CD
 

rascal

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Yeah, but she was right about those things.

When my dad really started to move up the corporate ladder, I was in college, and we started going to some really high-end restaurants. I took it upon myself to learn what every plate, utensil and glass on the table was for, and how to eat and drink like a proper gentleman.

The soup spoon thing is hard to get used to. It is not a natural movement.

I also leaned how to order wine, with the help of a sommelier, when you really don't know a lot about wine. Once you realize the sommelier is there to help you, not critique you, it is an easy experience.

CD

First time in Sydney about 87? We went and had dinner up the tower that's turns over the city. My friends boyfriend said I'll order the wine and said to me, your shout. Oh ok? He ordered s bottle of Gewurtztraminer ( still remember it) I had to pay like three times the meal for 1 bottle if wine. Never been caught out again,lol.

Russ
 

caseydog

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First time in Sydney about 87? We went and had dinner up the tower that's turns over the city. My friends boyfriend said I'll order the wine and said to me, your shout. Oh ok? He ordered s bottle of Gewurtztraminer ( still remember it) I had to pay like three times the meal for 1 bottle if wine. Never been caught out again,lol.

Russ

Gewurtztraminer is a dessert wine, or a cheese and fruit plate wine. I like it, but it would be really sweet for a dinner wine.

CD
 

Morning Glory

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