Whey

flyinglentris

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Whey comes in a variety of forms, only three of which are really suitable for food preparation - and one of those is more rarely used than the other. Given this, Whey Protein Powders and Whey Isolates are excluded from consideration. Instead, Sweet Whey, Sour Whey (Acid Whey) and Whey Solids are the forms that would be used in food preparation.

Whey is highly nutritious.

Sweet Whey and Whey Solids are more often used. It is a leftover product from Cheese making.

Sour or Acid Whey is a leftover product from making Yogurt. The thing about Sour Whey is that it is hauled off by the truckload to farms to be used as a nutritious fertilizer or discarded. Truth be told, there is too much of it to used as fertilizer as it causes a runoff that gets in streams, brooks, rivers and lakes and causes algal blooms which are detrimental to fish and other life. It has this negative stigma and is therefore rarely used, except commercially in food products. But there is an undercurrent of chefs and cooks who are discovering the potential of Sour Whey as a food ingredient which gives a unique flavor boost to foods.

For the home cook, Whey, especially Sour Whey, is a challenge to use. The home cook often, does not even consider Whey. Both Sweet and Sour forms are often substituted where milk, cream or butter might otherwise be used. But Whey may have unique applicability.

I can think of a few ways I might use Sweet Whey and Whey Solids. I'm sure some Cooking Bites members have probably used the same.

I'd be interested in hearing about or seeing responses on using Whey, especially any ventures regarding the use of Sour Whey.
 
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flyinglentris

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I'm kind of going on a less than usual flavoring adventure here. Whey is just one of several ingredients that I need to put my wits to.

I just made Tuna Salad Sandwiches for lunch today, using Albacore, Onion, Serrano Pepper, Mayonaise, Stone Ground Mustard and a tablespoon of shredded Horseradish. The Horseradish really put a favorable zing on those sandwiches.
 

flyinglentris

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So, what the heck are Whey Solids?

To understand that, it might be best to consider true Ricotta Cheese. Contemporary Supermarket Ricotta Cheese is made from Milk, because too much is required to be supported via mass production from Whey. True Ricotta Cheese is made from the strained tiny portion of solids that remain when Whey liquid is separated from Cheeses or Yogurt, usually Cheeses. These same solids can be dried and distributed as crumbs/powder.

Finding a source of true Ricotta Cheese or Whey Solids can be a task, as they are specialty items. But they are available.
 

Hemulen

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A large Finnish dairy has separated dairy salt from whey and uses it as a healthier salt substitute in e.g. cheeses and butter-margarine bread spreads. Whey is also used in Finnish quarks/curds which resemble the Icelandic Skyr. Quarks are used in e.g. baking and berry/fruit desserts combined with whipped cream. Quarks (which contain a bit of liquid whey on top) are sold both unflavored and seasoned with e.g. vanilla, lemon and strawberry. A typical berry pie consists of a basic crust, berries tossed in potato starch and a can of quark mixed with one or two eggs and sugar. Quark filled wheat buns with raisins and lemon zest are basic bakery goods here as well. Cheeses and cottage cheeses with whey residue are sold widely in Finland.
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Photo source

Whey (liquid filtered/dripped from making common buttermilk cheese, pic below) is used in e.g. bread making, porridges and smoothies.
juu.JPG

Photo source
 
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