Do you have meat free days?

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This is basically for the carnivores here. Do you have meat free days during the week? The 'Meatless Mondays' campaign aimed to raise awareness of healthy eating, and the need to reduce our carbon footprint. Going meatless on one day a week helps reduce the risk of cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as conserving water and fossil fuels, and of course, saving you money.

We have one day a week when our main meal consists of home made vegetable soup with crusty bread. We follow this with fresh fruit and yogurt or ice cream, and we actually look forward to our meat free day. Do you have a meat free day? What do you eat on that day?
 
Yeah, I'm having more meat free days during the week now - when I'm over at Night Train's, his folks feed us, and meat features heavily, so I'm getting plenty of it. Having it less at home means I save a bit of money - although I tend to be mean with met anyway, making a little go a long way, bulking pasta sauce up with veg for example. Now, I often just cut the meat bit out altogether. Pasta and curry are my likely dishes.
 
Yeah, I'm having more meat free days during the week now - when I'm over at Night Train's, his folks feed us, and meat features heavily, so I'm getting plenty of it. Having it less at home means I save a bit of money - although I tend to be mean with met anyway, making a little go a long way, bulking pasta sauce up with veg for example. Now, I often just cut the meat bit out altogether. Pasta and curry are my likely dishes.


We have meat free days. TVC makes a mean veg soup, served with fresh crusty bread, who needs meat?
 
Yes, but it's rather by accident than design. Increasingly so too. Mainly because I discovered a batch of mainly veg only slow cooker recipes and although I was sceptical I did try a couple and found to my delight they were fabulous.
I'd always found veggie meals a little bland and tended to leave me feeling like I was still missing something. (probably just happened on the wrong meals)
Anyway the discovery of these slow cooker veg recipes has changed my mind and I'm bit by bit tinkering with them to suit our families taste.
 
Yes, but it's rather by accident than design. Increasingly so too. Mainly because I discovered a batch of mainly veg only slow cooker recipes and although I was sceptical I did try a couple and found to my delight they were fabulous.
I'd always found veggie meals a little bland and tended to leave me feeling like I was still missing something. (probably just happened on the wrong meals)
Anyway the discovery of these slow cooker veg recipes has changed my mind and I'm bit by bit tinkering with them to suit our families taste.
It's strange, because if you cook vegetables for too long - say if you're serving them with Sunday lunch - they taste most unappetising. However, if you cook them in a soup or stew - or in your case a slow cooker recipe - they seem to take on an extra dimension of flavour. Any science geeks got an explanation for that, or will it remain one of life's great mysteries?
 
It's strange, because if you cook vegetables for too long - say if you're serving them with Sunday lunch - they taste most unappetising. However, if you cook them in a soup or stew - or in your case a slow cooker recipe - they seem to take on an extra dimension of flavour. Any science geeks got an explanation for that, or will it remain one of life's great mysteries?

I don't know the science, but the main difference seems to be that one is veg boiled in plain water, and the other is veg simmered in stock and other flavours. Perhaps the boiling temperature leaches out the flavour and nutrition, whereas the lesser temperature of simmering allows flavour to penetrate....
 
I don't know the science, but the main difference seems to be that one is veg boiled in plain water, and the other is veg simmered in stock and other flavours. Perhaps the boiling temperature leaches out the flavour and nutrition, whereas the lesser temperature of simmering allows flavour to penetrate....

Sounds about right :)
 
My two sons are vegetarian so we started meat free monday to ensure we all eat the same atleast once a week.
We usually have pasta or a big soup, sometimes I make a veggie curry or casserole, but pasta is the easiest, quickest option.
 
i do have meat free days. they are everyday. ha. i don't eat any meat and i'd like to become a vegan in time. that means no animal by-products. i hope everyone has at least one meat free day per week if not more. keep educating yourself on the subject.
 
I have a lot of meat free days because I love to eat vegetables. I could go a whole week without meat if I wanted to but I will fix me some chicken or pork depending on what I want at the time. I eat more chicken than anything else if I have to have meat because I am trying to cut down on red meat.
 
We have meat free days on Monday and Friday. On Mondays, we usually have pasta since Monday is hectic for me. On Fridays, we usually cook veggies.
 
This is basically for the carnivores here. Do you have meat free days during the week? The 'Meatless Mondays' campaign aimed to raise awareness of healthy eating, and the need to reduce our carbon footprint. Going meatless on one day a week helps reduce the risk of cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as conserving water and fossil fuels, and of course, saving you money.

We have one day a week when our main meal consists of home made vegetable soup with crusty bread. We follow this with fresh fruit and yogurt or ice cream, and we actually look forward to our meat free day. Do you have a meat free day? What do you eat on that day?

Short answer: no I don't have meatless days, I love meat and I believe all those "disadvantages" are highly exaggerated.

Long answer:
Going meatless on one day of the week will do exactly zero to help you or our carbon footprint in any way. It's a campaign aimed to bring up discussion about these things but actually doing it won't change much. Healthy eating is something that comes from everyday principles, applied to most (if not every) meal that we eat.
Also with regards to carbon footprint, yes eating meat does produce a larger carbon footprint than vegetables. However most of the carbon emissions to do with food come from packaging and transport. So instead of giving up meat we could focus more on these instead, especially since a lot of resources are being wasted on unnecessary packaging and transporting everyday items for great distances.
 
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