Eggs

garlichead

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Eggs have been around awhile and suspect we consumed them long before we were hunter gatherers and were just scavengers those millions of years ago. Health wise they are among the best sources of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants etc. and the biological score of all protein is measured against the protein in eggs where they're given a score of 100 and with a good breakdown of mono, poly and saturated fats and with these 2 nutrients (Protein and fat) being essential for life.

Eggs are one of those rare ingredients that are found in just about every culture and cuisine from savory to sweet. Over the last week at home and work I've used them for poached eggs, fried eggs, home made pasta, kimchi pancake, gnocchi, mayonnaise, rum baba, tiramisu, creme brulee, focaccia and slider buns.

What are your favorite ways using and consuming eggs?
 
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caseydog

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Scrambled in a medium heat pan, with lots of butter, stirring constantly until light and fluffy. Some breakfast meat and potatoes on the side. Hot cup of dark roast coffee, black to drink.

Some other favorites, a ham, cheese and mushroom omelet. Deviled eggs. Spanish tortilla. Eggs Benedict.

CD
 

Yorky

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Duck eggs are our preferred eggs here and they are available either privately or from the open markets. On average they are some 50% larger (and heavier) than standard chicken eggs and the yolk is about 70% of the egg (our chicken eggs are in the region of 50/50). They are also virtually all free range.

Typical difference:

 

karadekoolaid

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Agree with you 100%, garlichead.
Eggs are very nutritious, and really easy to prepare.
When I´ve got a cooking event , I make a 3 egg omelette filled with cheese and tomato, plus YMCA potatoes. Keeps me going till around 4-5 pm.
I love curried eggs, too, and reckon I might have seven or eight different recipes from all across India.
A quick breakfast dish in Venezuela is called "perico" - literally, "parakeet", because of all the colours. Eggs, fried onions, peppers, sweet chiles, coriander leaf, tomato, all stir-fried together.
Then there´s the wonderful way the Spanish stir an egg into a lot a fish/seafood dishes. A handful of whitebait, salt & pepper, and an egg which is barely cooked to keep the dish together.
And there´s nothing more decadent than Eggs Benedict (or with smoked salmon) slathered with hollandaise sauce.
 

garlichead

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Duck eggs are our preferred eggs here and they are available either privately or from the open markets. On average they are some 50% larger (and heavier) than standard chicken eggs and the yolk is about 70% of the egg (our chicken eggs are in the region of 50/50). They are also virtually all free range.

Typical difference:

Didn't know the yolks were bigger as a %. I get duck eggs once in a while from a lady just outside town for personal use, can't use them at the restaurant nor can we use farmers eggs, both of which are against the law, crazy but true.
 

Yorky

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Didn't know the yolks were bigger as a %. I get duck eggs once in a while from a lady just outside town for personal use, can't use them at the restaurant nor can we use farmers eggs, both of which are against the law, crazy but true.

It's difficult to show it in an image but this is an image of a couple of eggs I used some time ago. I find the main advantage of duck eggs when cooking (either poached, boiled, fried or steamed) is that with so little white (percentage wise), the white solidifies much quicker leaving an excellent runny yolk.


It's maybe that Thai ducks are different from Mercan ducks?
 
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garlichead

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It's difficult to show it in an image but this is an image of a couple of eggs I used some time ago. I find the main advantage of duck eggs when cooking (either poached, boiled, fried or steamed) is that with so little white (percentage wise), the white solidifies much quicker leaving an excellent runny yolk.


It maybe that Thai ducks are different from Mercan ducks?
I'll be making pasta for friends this weekend and I only use yolks and hopefully I can get some duck eggs.
 

garlichead

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Mine will certainly include smoked salmon. And possibly prosciutto also. My mouth is already watering and I've only just finished my tea!

I've been making Yorkshire pudding instead of the regular suspects and switched up from poached to soft scrambled with chives added filling the Yorkshires with that, then laying on the smoked salmon, works for me.
 

TastyReuben

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We eat a lot of eggs here, and it’s hard to list all the ways we like them:

Scrambled, either plain or with lots of things mixed in (peppers, onion, diced potato, tomato, celery, cheese, ham).

A scrambled egg sandwich on soft white supermarket bread with a load of mayonnaise and storm of cracked pepper is one of my top three favorite meals.

Omelettes, same thing - everything from just a plain one to loaded full.

Hard-boiled for snacks, on sandwiches, and on salads.

Soft-boiled for breakfast.

Poached, on just about everything. I’d include eggs in purgatory and similar dishes here.

Same with a fried egg - that’ll go on a burger, on a salad, on a crepe (with ham and cheese), or eaten plain with bacon and fried potatoes. If it’s on a sandwich, the yolk is usually cooked through, otherwise it’s runny.

Baked eggs…we love baked eggs, either done in little crocks, or cracked onto a breakfast pizza or over some other baked dish, like a hash brown casserole.

Every recipe in the US is written for grade large eggs, but Kroger have had Vital Farms medium eggs (18-count) marked down to $5 or so lately, so I've been buying those. I usually have between a dozen and two dozen in the fridge. Those are free-range, certified humane, blah blah blah, so that’s a good price for those.

In addition to all that, there’s baking with them, using them as an egg wash on a baked good, in soufflés, waffles, pancakes…I’m in those eggs every day!
 
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