Fritters Day

Morning Glory

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December 2nd is Fritters Day!

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There is some debate within the culinary community as to what kind of fried food can be considered a fritter. Some believe that anything that is battered and fried is a fritter, while others assert that a fritter must have the main ingredient chopped up and fried with the flour batter or dough. This can lead to some confusion over the nomenclature of fried foods - corn dogs are not considered to be fritters, because they are made by battering and frying a whole corn dog. Fried candy bars on the other hand, while being the sweet version of a fried corn dog – a whole candy bar battered and fried, are often called fritters.

Cultures around the world have their own version of the fritter. In the United States, fritters are usually made by mixing vegetables or fruits with a batter of flour and eggs. Popular fritters include corn fritters, apple fritters, and crab cakes. In Japan, tempura is a popular type of fritter and is served with sauces or with other dishes. In many parts of India, and Pakistan, fritters are called pakora and are made by mixing vegetables - usually onions or potatoes - with a batter of chick pea flour and deep frying them.*

What are your favourite kind of fritters? And how do you define a fritter?

*Source: https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/fun/fritters-day
 
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medtran49

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We are having sort of a fritter, arrancini, for dinner tonight. Risotto is made with some chopped prosciutto, which was leftover and a bit dry, onion, garlic, and parm. I'll put some mozzarella cubes in them when I form the balls. Haven't decided yet whether to use panko or bread crumbs for coating.

I like hushpuppies, corn fritters, and apple fritters in particular.
 

Karen W

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I'm fond of Zucchini fritters or pancakes -grated zucchini with a little salt drained and squeezed dry, mixed with eggs, flour, grated Parmesan cheese, bread crumbs and seasoning, & pan-fried. They're great with a squeeze of lemon juice, and sour cream on the side.
 

buckytom

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I vote for fritters being things where the ingredients are chopped into a doughy mix and fried. Just battering and frying something is just that; not technically a fritter.

I don't consider a crabcake a fritter. Well, not if you're doing it right and you're just adding enough binders to hold crabmeat together into a cake.

med brings up an interesting point about arancini, but imo, again, not a fritter. Sounds delicious, nonetheless. :hungry:

Hushpuppies would have to be my favorite fritter. Much like cornbread, (where's Wandering Bob?) they can be either savory or sweet.

I love jalapeno hushpuppies, warm from the fryer, with fresh, cold butter.
 

rascal

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Corn fritters for me, creamed corn an egg chopped onion bacon and flour to bind. Fried and served with Worcester sauce. Trust me, these go together

Russ
 

Herbie

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Potato fritters here. Slide of potato in batter (preferably beer batter). Deep fried. Nice in a sandwich.

Also banana fritters and apple fritters -slices of fruit in thick pancake batter.

Pakoras and tempura I don't think of as fritters.
 

Frizz1974

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Potato fritters here. Slide of potato in batter (preferably beer batter). Deep fried. Nice in a sandwich.

Also banana fritters and apple fritters -slices of fruit in thick pancake batter.

Pakoras and tempura I don't think of as fritters.


In NSW that first item - a slice of potato in beer batter and deep fried is referred to as a scallop.

If you head south into Victoria and ask for scallops you will be given sea scallops.

Chips (fries, but chunkier) & scallops are a common cheap lunch option here. Or were. Hot chips are not super cheap anymore as potatoes have more than doubled in price in the last 10 years here.
 

buckytom

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Looks a lot like a knish. Battered and fried mashed potatoes.
 

buckytom

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Yes, I see. I just meant it's very similar to our knishes. Which, btw, are available on many hot dog, roasted chestnut, and Halal carts all over the NY city this time of year. About a dollar each for a square that's about the size of your palm.

I need to go get one soon.
 

buckytom

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I should also mention that the K in Knish is hard, or obviously prounounced, so it sounds like Kuh- nish.
 
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