How do I know when fish is cooked??

CraigC

Veteran
Joined
1 Dec 2017
Local time
12:10 PM
Messages
4,350
Location
SE Florida
What kind of fish is it? Darker meat fish like tuna are different looking when cooked than the white-meat fish.
 

FowlersFreeTime

Senior Member
Joined
9 Jun 2021
Local time
12:10 PM
Messages
980
Location
Florida
Website
www.fowlersfreetime.com
Yep, as stated above, the type of fish gives you different visual cues as to how "done" it is. Generally, the flesh goes from translucent to opaque regardless of the color of the flesh, but the more experience you get with fish you will see that some are denser than others and can require longer to cook (even if the outer surface looks cooked).

So what type will you be cooking Lady?
 

caseydog

Forum GOD!
Joined
25 Aug 2019
Local time
11:10 AM
Messages
12,525
Location
Dallas, TX
Same advice. Flakey white fish like cod or hallibut is cooked one way, while meaty fish like tuna is cooked much differently.

CD
 

karadekoolaid

Veteran
Joined
4 Aug 2021
Local time
1:10 PM
Messages
2,610
Location
Caracas, Venezuela
Ditto to all the above.
Just as a guideline, however - when I do a salmon steak or a cod loin, it never takes more than 5 minutes. Size of steaks - about 150 - 175 gms each.
Tuna - I like it seared outside and raw inside, about 2 minutes.
But first of all, you´ve got to tell us what you are cooking (or what you cooked!)
 

ElizabethB

Guru
Joined
14 Aug 2017
Local time
11:10 AM
Messages
3,656
Location
Lafayette, LA. US
DITTO to all of the above. The type of fish and the method of cooking are important. Give us more information.
I live in south Louisiana, 35 miles north of the coast "as the crow flies." Fish and seafood in general are a major portion of our diet. When learning to cook my Dad told me that fish (seafood) should be cooked only until it is no longer raw. Oysters are the exception. Oysters should be cooked only long enuogh to scare them.
Give us more information and you will get better advice.
 

CraigC

Veteran
Joined
1 Dec 2017
Local time
12:10 PM
Messages
4,350
Location
SE Florida
DITTO to all of the above. The type of fish and the method of cooking are important. Give us more information.
I live in south Louisiana, 35 miles north of the coast "as the crow flies." Fish and seafood in general are a major portion of our diet. When learning to cook my Dad told me that fish (seafood) should be cooked only until it is no longer raw. Oysters are the exception. Oysters should be cooked only long enuogh to scare them.
Give us more information and you will get better advice.
You actually cook them? :D
 
Joined
15 Mar 2017
Local time
12:10 PM
Messages
1,938
Location
Canada
I don't mind my fish a bit translucent in the thicker parts of the fillet..Better than the thinner parts being over cooked and it continues to cook a bit as you start to eat it.....So, I shoot for 145 for white fish fillets to keep GF happy as she hates underdone fish..I have my handy dandy digital thermometer..I should get a holster for it as I whip it out many times a day..
 

Yorky

Uncomfortably numb
Recipe Challenge Judge
Joined
3 Oct 2016
Local time
12:10 AM
Messages
14,810
Location
Nakhorn Nowhere, N. E. Thailand.
Website
lifeinsurin.com
I've been considering vacuum packing a cod loin (about 250gms) with butter and a little salt/pepper and then cooking by sous vide. The information on the net tells me 55°C for 15 minutes.

Do you reckon this is viable?
 

garlichead

Über Member
Joined
6 May 2021
Local time
12:10 PM
Messages
2,319
Location
Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
I've been considering vacuum packing a cod loin (about 250gms) with butter and a little salt/pepper and then cooking by sous vide. The information on the net tells me 55°C for 15 minutes.

Do you reckon this is viable?
Hard to say really, it depends on the species, thickness and doneness. For cod 55C seems too well cooked for my liking but 15 minutes looks a little light, unless it's a very thin piece. Give it a go and make adjustments for next time.
 

Morning Glory

Obsessive cook
Staff member
Joined
19 Apr 2015
Local time
5:10 PM
Messages
45,110
Location
Maidstone, Kent, UK
I've been considering vacuum packing a cod loin (about 250gms) with butter and a little salt/pepper and then cooking by sous vide. The information on the net tells me 55°C for 15 minutes.

Do you reckon this is viable?

My only intelligence on this is that a lot of chefs advise against fish cooked sous vide. Fresh fish cooks so quickly to tender perfection, that there is no real advantage in using the sous vide method. It can also lead to a rather gummy strange soft texture.
 
Top Bottom