I have horse radish.....

rascal

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Growing in my garden, I believe it's a Brit thing, I've had it store bought from a jar but never fresh, or preserved. I'm told to leave some root in the ground to continue growing, then to scrub the ginger type like radish. I'm wanting to know:

A) how to make it
B) how to preserve it so I can use over 12 months???

Ps, the ghee and paneer I asked about weeks ago, I have settled on doing both these, I will post results.

Russ
 

Morning Glory

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Here are a few interesting ideas of how to use it when fresh:
  • Add a few little chunks to vodka (in one week it'll be really punchy).
  • Grate over sliced tomatoes. Season and top with lots of fresh parsley.
  • Grate into your mash potatoes.
  • For a quick horseradish sauce, mix grated horseradish, crème fraiche, lemon zest, a little lemon juice, salt and pepper (great swirled into a beetroot soup).
  • Horseradish butter: Grate, mix with softened butter. Plonk onto greaseproof paper. Roll into a sausage. Freeze till firm. Slice. Serve on top of steak or swirl into a beetroot or parsnip risotto.
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medtran49

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We grate and layer with sliced potatoes in a casserole, pour in some cream, cover, bake at 375 until potatoes are tender, uncover and cook for about 10-15 minutes until potatoes have some browning on them. Sometimes, we'll put thin pork chops in about half way through the layering process.

We also use it to make homemade Worcestershire sauce.

This site tells you how to preserve it Make and Preserve Horseradish.

Take heed of what she says about the smell. Craig grated it on a hand grater the first time we used it and cried at least a cup of tears. We have used either the shredder disk on the food processor or the Kitchen Aid shredder attachment since.

You can probably freeze the root whole (like you can ginger) and grate it while still frozen. That should keep more of the pungency than if you grated it and then froze in portions.
 

rascal

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Grate, pun intended , ideas, I'm going to make the butter one and also froze it in a sausage. Many thanks. Pics when I do. Prolly later today, as I'm outside soon watering crops.

Russ
 

rascal

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Root dug up and cleaned, thumb nail was the best tool. Then shredded with lemon juice and mixed with 1 lb of butter. Rolled and frozen. I kept some for my friend who gave me the root. Kept small amount back to mix with cream etc.

36183


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MrsDangermouse

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We grow horseradish on our allotment - watch out its VERY invasive (even worse than mint!). We grow ours in a plastic dustbin partially sunk into the ground with drainage holes drilled in the bottom, and still the horseradish manages to escape.

Unprepared roots will last a good while in the fridge if wrapped tightly in cling film, but once prepared I've found it quickly loses a lot of its pungency so freezing is probably the best way of keeping it. We usually use the food processor to puree it with a drop of water, then once its reached full pungency add white vinegar to preserve it, then put into jars and freeze. I like the idea of mixing it with butter though - will try that next year :okay:
 

JAS_OH1

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I want it very simple with just the white vinegar and salt. Thank you! I think I might like just making a fresh batch each time hubby wants some. He loves it with prime rib or just about any steak, and than of course it makes a lovely cocktail sauce for shrimp and other seafood. I also like it with sliced roast beef for sandwiches; horseradish with mayo, yum. Oh and hubby mixes his with blue cheese to put atop his filet mignon at the very end of cooking.

If it's that invasive, could I plant part of a root in the ground and it will grow? I don't want it taking over the whole garden, though. Also does it come back each year even in cold climates where it gets below 0 C?
 

rascal

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I want it very simple with just the white vinegar and salt. Thank you! I think I might like just making a fresh batch each time hubby wants some. He loves it with prime rib or just about any steak, and than of course it makes a lovely cocktail sauce for shrimp and other seafood. I also like it with sliced roast beef for sandwiches; horseradish with mayo, yum. Oh and hubby mixes his with blue cheese to put atop his filet mignon at the very end of cooking.

If it's that invasive, could I plant part of a root in the ground and it will grow? I don't want it taking over the whole garden, though. Also does it come back each year even in cold climates where it gets below 0 C?
Mine was planted on the dark side of the house, next to mint. I don't care what grows there. I only dug about 1/4 of it out.
Show us a pic when you do it please.

Russ

Russ
 

MrsDangermouse

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If it's that invasive, could I plant part of a root in the ground and it will grow? I don't want it taking over the whole garden, though. Also does it come back each year even in cold climates where it gets below 0 C?
Yes you could try it - I'd recommend using pieces about 10-15cm long and about 1cm in diameter. It doesn't seem to mind the cold - we don't get very cold winters here, but we do get temperatures below 0 and our horseradish comes back every year. It is likely to spread - the roots grow very long and can travel a long way. If you don't want it to take over (and I wouldn't - I don't think its a particularly pretty plant) you would be better growing it in a large container rather than direct in the ground (we use a 90 litre dustbin that I drilled drainage holes in the bottom of).

What we get in the grocery is much larger than rascal 's and different in color, besides looking like male"crown jewels." So rascal 's is either a different variety or much younger.
Possibly a combination of both.....the horseradish we grow looks very similar to rascal's but we've found the roots are getting thicker each year. Its more difficult to peel the thin roots than the nice fat ones you buy in the shops, but it tastes just the same :okay:
 

rascal

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What we get in the grocery is much larger than rascal 's and different in color, besides looking like male"crown jewels." So rascal 's is either a different variety or much younger. https://www.reddit.com/r/mildlypenis/comments/9k9l1g
I think the difference is the age, mine was dug from a plant that was planted only a year before. So I'm picking if I dig more in December it may be a lot thicker then?? I only dug a side root to try it. It definitely is and tastes hot though.

Russ
 
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