Recipe Macaroni and Cheese My Way

medtran49

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Mac n cheese is really a murican thing, IMO, I would never try this recipe, just too many steps and ingredients. However I would eat it if someone cooked it for me. I make a macaroni dessert, prolly my fave dessert. 5 ingredients.
Not knocking it Craig, just not my cup of tea. :)

Russ
Not really. I'm sure Mac and cheese is an off shoot of kaesespaetzle and spaetzle has been documented to have been around for a very, very long time.
 

morning glory

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Not really. I'm sure Mac and cheese is an off shoot of kaesespaetzle and spaetzle has been documented to have been around for a very, very long time.
I'm not sure it was originally an American thing - it is certainly much more popular there than in the UK. But nevertheless its quite often seen here. I had it as a kid and still make it occasionally. It doesn't come in 'boxes' here though which I know it can do in the US.

Macaroni seemed literally to be the only dried pasta shape available when I was a kid. I'll do a spot of research when I get a moment. Starting with some old cookery books I have...

And yes, @rascal we had it as a sweet milk dessert back in the day. Cooked rather like a rice pudding, in the oven.
 

morning glory

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Macaroni Cheese first recorded recipe:

The first modern recipe for macaroni and cheese was included in Elizabeth Raffald's 1770 (British) book, The Experienced English Housekeeper. Raffald's recipe is for a Béchamel sauce with cheddar cheese—a Mornay sauce in French cooking—which is mixed with macaroni, sprinkled with Parmesan, and baked until bubbly and golden. Another recipe from 1784 stated that the small tubes of macaroni must be boiled, then drained in a sifter before being moved to a frying pan. Heavy cream is then added to the macaroni along with a "knob of butter" rolled in flour, and it must be cooked for five minutes before being transferred to a dish and topped with toasted Parmesan and pepper.The famous British Victorian cookbook Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management included two macaroni and cheese recipes.
 

rascal

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I'm not sure it was originally an American thing - it is certainly much more popular there than in the UK. But nevertheless its quite often seen here. I had it as a kid and still make it occasionally. It doesn't come in 'boxes' here though which I know it can do in the US.

Macaroni seemed literally to be the only dried pasta shape available when I was a kid. I'll do a spot of research when I get a moment. Starting with some old cookery books I have...

And yes, @rascal we had it as a sweet milk dessert back in the day. Cooked rather like a rice pudding, in the oven.
Exactly.

Russ
 
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