My region: the produce & dishes

morning glory

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Which produce and dishes are a speciality of your region? Please feel free to define 'region' how you wish - but a region rather than your whole country. Do you have regional recipes? Are there some great breweries or wine makers in your area? This is your chance to sing the praises of your part of the world.
 

TastyReuben

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This should be a good topic.

Off the top of my head, the two most unique dishes we have are goetta (which we've discussed on the forum) and Cincinnati-style chili (which we've also touched on).

We do have plenty of quality makers of things, like Graeter's ice cream, Montgomery Inn ribs, things like that.

There are a ton of craft brewers, one of the leading beer cities in the US, which is amazing considering our size.

We also have the largest Oktoberfest outside of Munich, and the only one sanctioned by the city of Munich (which is our sister city).
 

rascal

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Christchurch New Zealand
A native Maori tradition is cooking food in an underground oven in the earth. Called a hangi. Hung ee.
I've adapted a 44 gallon drum and cook food in that. It tastes exactly like the Maori way, just not as much work. I don't think anyone here would have tried let alone heard of it. I can put pics up later if any interest. I normally do one every year or so for my friends and family. It cooks for around 30 people. I normally cook 2 legs of lamb, a roll of beef, and 4 chickens, and a big bag of veges. Feel free to ask if you don't understand. I'm picking this is the odd thing out here.

Russ
 

MrsDangermouse

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Hampshire, UK
I grew up in Stilton and Melton Mowbray pork pie country..... as a child we always got our Stilton direct from the dairy in the next village - it was so much nicer than the cheese you got from the supermarket, even though they were all made in the same place. Must be something to do with the age and transportation. I still smile when I see Stilton from Long Clawson dairy in the supermarket :happy:

I'm not sure if there are any regional specialities where I live now - there's plenty of good food and artisan producers and shops around here, but as far as I'm aware there's nothing with protected designation of origin or protected geographical indication. The only things I can think of that the area is known for are watercress and gin.
 

CraigC

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Winter strawberries are a big thing in south Florida, sweet corn, cane and citrus fruit. Although most avocados are imported from Mexico, there are many varieties grown in Florida. Although most coco plum is used as an ornamental hedge, it can bare fruit. We love our stone crab claws when in season, lobster and other local seafood. Grouper and hogfish are very popular.

Cuban food is very popular as well.
 

TastyReuben

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A popular candy to make at home (or buy) is something called buckeyes - think of a round peanut butter cup. A ball of sweetened peanut butter mostly dipped in chocolate.

They look like buckeyes and Ohio is The Buckeye State, so there are lots of buckeye candies for sale or at family gatherings.
 

morning glory

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The only things I can think of that the area is known for are watercress
It is indeed the most delicious water cress though. I used to live down in Hampshire and indeed I grew up in Portsmouth. I can't recall anything much else as a regional speciality there either although surely there must be something. :scratchhead:
 

cookieee

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We used to be known for our orange groves. Coconuts, lots of shrimp, Mahi Mahi, our Florida lobster, conch fritters, Key Lime Pie, kumquats.

You can have a craving for any nationality food and you will find a restaurant here that serves that.
 
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Karen W

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California. In a nutshell Produce, citrus, walnuts, strawberries, lemons, avocados, raisins, seafood, etc. Mexican, Asian, fusion, healthy lifestyle cuisine, organic. Exception is the In and out Burger. No popular fried foods except fish tacos. Gourmet(?) creative untraditional pizza from chef Wolfgang puck, i.e. smoked salmon, cream cheese & caviar pizza, pizza with an egg in top. Avocado toast. Dates (date shakes) from Indio California. Danish pastry and pancakes (aebelskivers) from Solvang. Wine from Nappa Valley in Northern ca. Fresh Strawberry stuffed donuts became popular from a small donut shop/store. Driving up the coast, when you roll down the car windows you can smell the oranges in the orange groves. Still thinking.

Eta: Farmers' markets are popular here. Farmers sell their locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood and wares/shops. One of the oldest and best, imo, is the Hollywood Farmers market in Los Angeles. There are several restaurants there as well, that serve tasty meals at a good price. Pink's hot dogs has been around for quite a while. Great dogs, with a wide variety of choices for toppings.

Olvera street is popular for it's Mexican food and wares.

Philippe's in downtown Los Angeles is famous for it's French Dip sandwiches.

Canter's in Los Angeles known for Jewish food/deli, and my faves potato knish & the black and white cookie.

As you drive up the coast, further away from Los Angeles, you can see cows (dairy and beef?), and rows and rows of crops. Lettuce perhaps.
 
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CraigC

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We used to be known for our orange groves. Coconuts, lots of shrimp, Mahi Mahi, our Florida lobster, conch fritters, Key Lime Pie, kumquats.

You can have a craving for any nationality food and you will find a restaurant here that serves that.
Maybe before 1977, but after that all queen conch is imported. Harvesting in Florida waters was permanently banned in 1985
 

Karen W

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Then there's the Cobb Salad, invented by the owner of the Brown Derby restaurant, Mr. Cobb. The restaurant was shaped like a man's Derby hat in Hollywood, Ca. Supposedly, he was hungry late at night, and tossed some refrigerator ingredients together.
 

epicuric

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Shropshire, UK
I grew up in Stilton and Melton Mowbray pork pie country..... as a child we always got our Stilton direct from the dairy in the next village - it was so much nicer than the cheese you got from the supermarket, even though they were all made in the same place. Must be something to do with the age and transportation. I still smile when I see Stilton from Long Clawson dairy in the supermarket :happy:

I'm not sure if there are any regional specialities where I live now - there's plenty of good food and artisan producers and shops around here, but as far as I'm aware there's nothing with protected designation of origin or protected geographical indication. The only things I can think of that the area is known for are watercress and gin.
Don't forget venison! Although it's available nationally through supermarkets, it always tastes better in the New Forest. I bought some red wine venison burgers from a farm shop (can't remember its exact location, but not far from Ringwood) last December - amazing flavour! As for the home made venison sausages served at The Fighting Cocks just outside Fordingbridge... wow!
 

caseydog

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In North Texas, it is Beef! Steaks rule, and ribeye steaks are the top of the class. TexMex and Chili are big-time, too. We are slowly adding some good Texas BBQ smokehouses, but the best Texas BBQ is in Central Texas.

Can't forget Chicken Fried Steak, either. A plate of chicken fried steak with mashed potatoes and fried okra, smothered in "white gravy" is one of my favorite "cheat meals." So good... so bad for you.

The Mexican "Supermercados" here generally have excellent produce, but not necessarily good meats. Produce is very important to Mexican immigrant families. BTW, for those of you who do not live in Texas, or even in the USA, Texans have a different relationship with Mexican immigrants than what is seen in the news over the last few years. The Texas economy would collapse without them, and I would lose some very good friends.

CD
 
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